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To supplement Chapter 3 National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers and the Social Security administration to an estimated 62 million beneficiaries in 2016– 41 million retirees and survivors, with Old Age Survivor Insurance (OASI) and 21 million disabled workers - 14 million with Disability Insurance (DI) and 9 million with Supplemental Security Income (SSI) with some overlap in 2015.  The United States must get the OASDI tax rate right to save the DI trust fund from depletion and avoid deprivation of relief benefits under 18USC§246.  To pay for a 3% COLA (Cost of Living Adjustment) with a Free DIRT (Disability Insurance Reallocation Tax) and 3% COLA (Cost of Living Adjustment) Act of January 1, 2016. To amend the DI tax rate from 1.80% to 2.40% in 2016, 2.30% in 2017 and 2.20% in 2018; from 0.90% to 1.20% in 2016, 1.15% in 2017 and 1.10% in 2018 for employees and from 0.90% to 1.20% in 2016, 1.15% in 2017 and 1.10% in 2018 for employers under Sec. 201(b)(1)(S) of the Social Security Act 42USC§401. To amend the OASI tax rate from 10.60% to 10.0% in 2016, 10.10% in 2017, and 10.20% in 2018; from 5.30% to 5.00% in 2016, to 5.05% in 2017, to 5.10% in 2018 for employees under 26USC§3101 (a) and from 5.30% to 5.00% in 2016, 5.05% in 2017, and 5.10% in 2018 for employers under 26USC§3111 (a) to avoid depletion of the Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund in 2016 without increasing the overall 12.4% OASDI or 15.3% OASDI and Hospital Insurance (HI) Federal Insurance Contribution Act tax-rate under 26USC§1401. To repeal Sec. 215 (i) of the Social Security Act 42USC§415 and legislate a 3% annual COLA. To cite ILO Conventions 132, 156 and 183 in a Maternity Leave Act in amendment of Sec. 305 of the Social Security Act 42USC§505. To replace welfare Administrative Law Judges (ALJs) with licensed social workers and non-social worker representatives under Sec. 206 of the Social Security Act 42USC§406.  To limit the term of the Commissioner from 6 to 2 years, by amendment of Sec. 702 of the Social Security Act 42USC(7)VII§902(a)(3).  To automatically increase monthly benefits to $700 after 42 months $600-$699 (Revelation 13:10) and redress wrongful overpayment decisions since the Defense of Social Security Caucus of 2011 with underpayment Sec. 204 of the Social Security Act 42USC§404. To require the Commissioner of SSA to account for OASDI, SSI and Human Services to end poverty by 2020 and require the Administrator of CMS to account for a 2.5% Medicare, Medicaid and ACA health annuity in summer solstice instructions (ssi) by amending Annual Reports Sec. 1161 of the Social Security Act 42USC§1320c-10. To amend the Amount of Premiums in Sec. 1839 of the Social Security 42USC§1395r for a 2.5% health annuity to lead ACA and other private health insurance corporations to credit customers with the difference with the 20% ACA and 50% Medicare part B premium price inflation 2015-16.  To limit federal health spending to less than $1 trillion until national health expenditures are less than 10% of GDP. To repeal 'medical records and payments' from the Fair Credit Reporting Act 15USC§1681a(x)(1). To require the USDA to sustain 3% annual Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) growth.  To create a UN contribution row on the 1040 tax form with a suggested donation of 1-2% of income.  To pass a Without Income Limit Law (WILL): To abolish the maximum taxable limit on DI contributions on January 1, 2016 and OASI contributions January 1, 2017 by repealing Adjustment of the contribution and benefit base Section 230 of the Social Security Act 42USC§430 to tax the rich and increase OASDI revenues by 130% and SSI spending by 250% to balance the federal budget in 2017 and end poverty by 2020. 

 

Be the Democratic and Republican (DR) two party system Abolished, referred to the Actuary, Commissioner and Trustees (ACT) 

 

1st Ed. 2003, 1st15 September 2004, 2nd 1 June 2005, 3rd 18 June 2006, 4th 17 June 2007. 5th 12 June 2009, 6th 31 July 2010, 7th 17 August 2011, 8th 14 July 2012, 9th 26 July 2015.10th 7 September 2015, 11th 7 February 2016, 12th 24 May 2016

 

Summer Solstice Instructions

 

1.  Chapter 3 National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Title 24 US Code Subchapter V Battle Mountain Sanitarium Reserve, §151-154 to settle bona claims to land; private exchange of lands under §153 and up to $1,000 fine and 12 months in jail for the unlawful intrusion of reserves or violation of rules and regulations under §154 are preserved.  Benefit programs are regulated by the civil rights crime deprivation of relief benefits under 18USC§246. The SSA Actuary, Commissioner and Treasurer (ACT) must compensate all social security beneficiaries for the misdemeanor “no COLA” offense on January 1 and a felony if disability benefits are cut because the Commissioner is unable to uphold the standard of calculus needed to adjust the OASDI tax rates, as has not been done since 2000, causing the Disability Insurance (DI) trust fund to become depleted.  .  OASDI has a 300% trust fund ratio, beneficiaries are due a 3% COLA to foster normal 3% economic growth.  The correct OASDI tax rate, that must be retroactively accounted for, to afford underpayment from January 1, 2016 is – 2.4% DI 10.0% OASI in 2016, 2.3% DI 10.1% OASI in 2017, and 2.2% DI and 10.2% OASI in 2018. The federal government could have a budget surplus with which to end poverty if only the $118,500 (2015) OASDI limit on taxable income were eliminated.  The DI trust fund alone would produce enough surplus to afford the USPS deficit.  However, if the federal budget were accurately accounted for there would be only a -$71 billion deficit in 2016 before it turns into a surplus.  Therefore, it is proposed to pay up to a $100 billion maximum allowable deficit (mad) and reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty, instead of ending poverty by 2020 beginning with a 250% increase in SSI spending in 2017.  The Actuary has been held harmless since the 2015 Annual Reports and both OASDI and CMS Actuaries are as tardy in 2016 as the Commissioner’s May 20th Report on SSI was in 2015. The United States does not boast a single accurate federal spending account valued over $500 billion.  The 2014 OASI table did not declare the 3.4% average interest rate and the low and high projections were jumbled.  Medicare premiums increased 50% between 2015-16 and the ultimate assumptions on all health inflation must be for a 2.5% health annuity, beginning in the sixth month of the year, without any retroactivity for those whose payments were held harmless at the previous year’s rate.  ACA premiums also increased more than 20% 2015-16 and the captive audience is due consumer credit for the difference with a 2.5% health annuity, from the sixth month of the year.  HHS accounting is challenged by a trillion dollar limit on federal health department spending until national health expenditures are less than 10% of GDP by 2030 with a 2.5% health annuity.   The SSA Commissioner and CMS Administrator shall produce summer solstice instructions (ssi) to end poverty by 2020, beginning in 2016.  Otherwise it is to be HA for Commissioner of Social Security and it will take five years to update the new edition supplementing the United States code 2015-2020.  Tony Sanders is 41, ages 40-44 are statistically the lowest rates of disability, the Social Security Amendments of January 1, 2016 may be the only HA legislation to ever pass Congress - to end poverty by 2020.

 

Federal Insurance Contribution Act (FICA) Rates

 

Tax rate for employees and employers, each

Tax rate for self-employed workers

 

Year

OASI

DI

OASDI

HI

Total

OASI

DI

OASDI

HI

Total

 

37-49

1.000

--

1.000

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

 

1950

1.500

--

1.500

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

 

51-53

1.500

--

1.500

--

--

2.250

--

2.250

--

2.250

 

54-56

2.000

--

2.000

--

--

3.000

--

3.000

--

3.000

 

57-58

2.000

0.250

2.250

--

--

3.0000

0.3750

3.375

--

3.375

 

1959

2.250

0.250

2.500

--

--

3.3750

0.3750

3.750

--

3.750

 

60-61

2.750

0.250

3.000

--

--

4.1250

0.3750

4.500

--

4.500

 

1962

2.875

0.250

3.125

--

--

4.3250

0.3750

4.700

--

4.700

 

63-65

3.375

0.250

3.625

--

--

5.0250

0.3750

5.400

--

5.400

 

1966

3.500

0.350

3.850

0.350

4.200

5.2750

0.5250

5.800

0.350

6.150

 

1967

3.550

0.350

3.900

0.500

4.400

5.3750

0.5250

5.900

0.500

6.400

 

1968

3.325

0.475

3.800

0.600

4.400

5.0875

0.7125

5.800

0.600

6.400

 

1969

3.725

0.475

4.200

0.600

4.800

5.5875

0.7125

6.300

0.600

6.900

 

1970

3.650

0.550

4.200

0.600

4.800

5.4750

0.8250

6.300

0.600

6.900

 

71-72

4.050

0.550

4.600

0.600

5.200

6.0750

0.8250

6.900

0.600

7.500

 

1973

4.300

0.550

4.850

1,000

5.850

6.2050

0.7950

7.000

1.000

8.000

 

74-77

4.375

0.575

4.950

0.900

5.850

6.1850

0.8150

7.000

0.900

7.900

 

1978

4.275

0.775

5.050

1.000

6.050

6.0100

1.0900

7.100

1.000

8.100

 

1979

4.330

0.750

5.080

1.050

6.130

6.0100

1.0400

7.050

1.050

8.100

 

1980

4.520

0.560

5.080

1.050

6.130

6.2725

0.7775

7.050

1.050

8.200

 

1981

4.700

0.650

5.350

1.300

6.650

7.0250

0.9750

8.000

1.300

9.300

 

1982

4.575

0.825

5.400

1.300

6.700

6.8125

1.2375

8.050

1.300

9.350

 

1983

4.775

0.625

5.400

1.300

6.700

7.1125

0.9375

8.050

1.300

9.350

 

1984

5.200

0.500

5.700

1.300

7.000

10.400

1.000

11.400

2.600

14.000

 

1985

5.200

0.500

5.700

1.350

7.050

10.400

1.000

11.400

2.700

14.100

 

1986-87

5.200

0.500

5.700

1.450

7.150

10.400

1.000

11.400

2.900

14.300

 

88-89

5.530

0.530

6.060

1.450

7.510

11.060

1.060

12.120

2.900

15.020

 

90-93

5.600

0.600

6.200

1.450

7.650

11.200

1.200

12.400

2.900

15.300

 

94-96

5.260

0.940

6.200

1.450

7.650

10.520

1.880

12.400

2.900

15.300

 

97-99

5.350

0.850

6.200

1.450

7.650

10.700

1.700

12.400

2.900

15.300

 

2000

5.300

0.900

6.200

1.450

7.650

10.600

1.800

12.400

2.900

15.300

 

Fut.

Year

OASI

DI

OASDI

 

HI

 

Total

OASI

DI

OASDI

 

HI

Total

 

2016

5.000

1.200

6.200

1.450

7.650

10.000

2.400

12.400

2.900

15.300

 

2017

5.050

1.150

6.200

1.450

7.650

10.100

2.300

12.400

2.900

15.300

 

2018

5.100

1.100

6.200

1.450

7.650

10.200

2.200

12.400

2.900

15.300

 

Tax rate for employees and employers, each

Tax rate for self-employed workers

Source: 2015 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal OASDI and Federal DI Trust Funds

 

2. Social security is the largest, most important and most loved social program in modern governments.  Social Security administrates monthly benefits to an estimated 62 million people – 41 million retirees and survivors, with Old Age Survivor Insurance (OASI) and 21 million disabled workers - 14 million with  Disability Insurance (DI) and 9 million with Supplemental Security Income (SSI).  The United States must get the OASDI tax rate right to save the DI trust fund from depletion. Since 2000 when the 1.8% rate was legislated the OASDI tax rate has not been changed and it is projected that the DI trust fund is going to be depleted this 2016 although OASI makes enough revenues to pay for DI without an OASI deficit until 2019 if optimally adjusted. In 2008, just before costs first exceeded revenues, it became apparent that the DI trust fund was going to be depleted much sooner than the OASI trust fund and the DI tax rate should have been increased. In 2000 the DI Trust Fund disbursed $60.2 billion, the balance was $55 billion. Since 2009 DI program costs have exceeded combined payroll tax and interest income by -$12.2 in 2009, -$23.6 in 2010 and -$25.8 in 2011. The trust fund ratio began its inexorable decline from a high of 199% in 2008 to 183% in 2009. DI costs continued to rise but revenues declined to a low of $105.5 billion in 2010. Growth was slow and by 2012 DI total revenues were $108.8 but program cost had risen to $138.5 billion and the trust fund had fallen to $132 billion 117% of annual benefit payments. (Tables VI. C5, VI.G2 Disability Benefit Disbursement under the OASDI Program 2013 Annual Report). By 2015 total revenues were projected to increase to $121.2 but the early retirement of the baby boomers had swollen payments to $151 billion and there was only $28.4 billion left, at the end of the year the trust fund ratio was 39% and in 2016 the trust fund is expected to be entirely depleted and would cease functioning, reduced benefits would continue to be paid with tax revenues. (Table IV.A2 Operations of the DI Trust Fund 2014 Annual Report). It is unfair that SSA is considering cutting benefits as low as 80% of current value when the trust fund is depleted sometime in 2016 when all they need to do is adjust the tax rate. In 2016 total revenues are estimated to be $129.3 billion, payroll tax contributions are estimated to be $125..7 billion and total expenses $159.4 billion. To quickly estimate the minimum tax rate that the DI trust fund needs with the ratio 1.8 / 125.7 = x / 159.4 where x yields a DI tax rate of 2.3%. The DI trust fund has however been operating on a deficit since 2009 and is nearly depleted at year end 2015. It is therefore necessary to adjust the OASDI tax rate to an emergency rate of 2.4% to avoid depleting the trust fun. Using the same equation 1.8 / 125.7 = 2.4 / x the 2.4% rate would generate $167.6 billion in revenues, saving $8.2 billion for a trust fund balance of $44.2 billion, including about $1.5 billion in interest income at year end 2016. The United States must legislate the 2.4% DI and 10.0% OASI tax rate immediately. In 2017 the 2.3% tax rate is estimated to bring in $170.5 billion and expenses are estimated at $165.2 billion saving the DI trust fund $5.7 billion, bringing the trust fund balance to $51.6 billion, including about $1.7 billion interest income. In 2018 so many baby boomers are expected to have retired from disability that the actual DI tax rate should be adjusted to 2.2%, to prevent an early deficit in the OASI trust fund, making $185 billion and costing $171.2 billion, saving $13.8 billion. The DI tax rate of 2.2% and OASI tax rate of 10.2% is expected to be the intermediate rate from 2018 to at least 2022, that holds even when the OASI trust fund begins to show a deficit around 2020 to protect the smaller DI trust fund. The OASI trust fund is much larger and can better afford to lobby SSA to eliminate the maximum taxable limit on income and tax the richest to increase OASDI tax revenues by 130%, increase welfare spending and balance the federal budget, the year the new tax goes into effect. H.R. 1314, the "Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015," introduced on September 27, 2015 Section 833 concedes to a 2.37% DI tax rate but 2016-2018 but has not amended the law in time. The 2.4% DI and 10.0% OASI OASDI tax rate estimates for 2016 must be legislated right away by unanimous roll-call vote of the Social Security Amendments of January 1, 2016.

 

OASDI Trust Funds: Current, Free DIRT and WILL 2015-2022

 

OASI

DI

OASDI

Year

Total Rev.

Gross Cost

Gross Increase

Total Rev.

Gross

Cost

Gross Increase

Total Rev.

Gross Cost

Gross Increase

2015

816.8

758.7

58.1

121.2

151.0

-29.8

938.0

909.7

28.3

2016

858.8

807.5

51.3

125.8

155.8

-30.0

984.6

963.3

21.3

DIRT

824.5

807.5

17

161.2

155.8

5.4

985.7

963.3

22.4

WILL

824.5

807.5

17

208.7

161.0

47.7

1,033.2

968.5

64.7

2017

907.4

861.1

46.3

133.6

161.2

-27.6

1,041

1,022

18.7

DIRT

869.7

861.1

8.6

171.3

161.2

10.1

1,041

1,022

18.7

WILL

1,090.8

950.2

140.6

222.4

167.3

55.1

1,313.2

1,117.5

195.7

2018

959.6

920.5

39.1

141.9

167.1

-25.2

1,101.5

1,087.6

13.9

DIRT

926.1

920.5

5.6

174.4

167.1

7.3

1,100.5

1,087.6

12.9

WILL

1,163.2

1,023

140.2

226.9

173.9

53

1,390.1

1,196.9

193.2

2019

1,009.8

985.1

24.7

149.7

173.6

-23.9

1,159.5

1,158.7

0.8

DIRT

973.5

985.1

-11.6

184

173.6

10.4

1,157.5

1,158.7

-1.2

WILL

1,223.9

1,101

122.9

240.2

180.9

59.3

1,464.1

1,281.9

182.2

2020

1,059.6

1,055

4.6

157.6

180.6

-23

1,217.2

1,235.6

-18.4

DIRT

1,020.4

1,055

-34.6

194.1

180.6

13.5

1,214.5

1,235.6

-31.1

WILL

1,284.7

1,184

100.7

254.0

188.2

65.8

1,538.7

1,372.2

166.5

2021

1,109.4

1,123

-13.6

165.5

189.4

-23.9

1,274.9

1,312.4

-37.5

DIRT

1,067.1

1,123

-55.9

204.2

189.4

14.8

1,271.3

1,312.4

-41.1

WILL

1,347.4

1,268

79.4

267.6

197.2

70.4

1,615

1,465.2

149.8

2022

1,158.5

1,197

-38.5

173.5

198.5

-25

1,332

1,395.5

-63.5

DIRT

1.113.1

1,197

-83.9

214.4

198.5

15.9

1,327.5

1,395.5

-68

WILL

1,409.8

1,359

50.8

281.3

206.3

75.0

1,691.1

1,565.3

125.8

Source: 2014 Annual Report of the Trustees Table IV.A1 recalculated at 3.4% interest rate plus DI Table IV.A2

 

3. The WILL would insure everyone in the United States against poverty by 2020.  The goal is to end poverty by 2020.  However, if the federal budget is not balanced the United States will only be able to reduce poverty by half and end child poverty by 2020.  Because the true budget deficit is estimated to be only -$71 in 2017 the WILL would pay up to $100 billion maximum allowable deficit (mad) although the true deficit in. Ending poverty is better than debt relief. Poverty now afflicts more than 46 million people in the United States. The goal of the low and intermediate SSI spending and beneficiary projections for the WILL is to reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty while paying up to $100 billion maximum allowable deficit (mad) although the true deficit in 2017 is estimated to be only $71 billion before it becomes a surplus and the federal government would have enough money to pay SSI benefits to 61.3 million people, more than are currently poor. Poverty relief is better economics than debt relief. Poverty now afflicts more than 46 million people in the United States. To mathematically reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty in schools by 2020 with SSI benefits it would take at least 20 million new SSI benefits, averaging $627 in 2020 for a total new cost $12.5 billion a month, $150 billion in 2020. Two-thirds of 20 million new benefits, 14 million benefits for children and another one-third, 6 million benefits, for adults by 2020 at a regular growth rate of five million new SSI benefits over a four year period 2017-2020 would be 62% annual spending growth, including a 3% COLA could be estimated at 63% in 2017. Administrative growth is hoped to remain stable at 3% annually with the help of school Individual Education Plans (IEPs) for poor students and reliable rates of growth.

 

SSI with a WILL to End Poverty by 2020

 

Year

Monthly Benefit

(in dollars)

Average Benefit

Beneficiaries

(in millions)

Annual Benefits

(in billions)

Annual Admin.

(in billions)

Annual SSI Costs

(in billions)

2015

$733

$541

8.3

$53.9

$4.4

58.3

2016

733

541

8.3

54.7

4.5

59.2

2016 Free

755

557

8.3

55.5

4.6

60.1

2016 DI WILL Low

755

557

8.5

56.8

4.6

61.4

2017 Free

777

574

8.4

56.3

4.7

61.0

2017 WILL Intermediate

777

574

19.9

137.3

4.7

142

2017 WILL Low

777

574

13.5

93.0

4.7

97.7

2017 WILL High

777

777

24.9

232

4.7

237

2018 Free

800

591

8.5

60.3

4.9

65.2

2018 WILL Intermediate

800

591

22.4

159.1

4.9

164

2018 WILL Low

800

591

19

134.7

4.9

139.6

2018 WILL High

800

800

37.0

355.1

4.9

360

2019 Free

825

609

8.7

63.6

5.0

68.6

2019 WILL Intermediate

825

609

24.7

181

5.0

186

2019 WILL Low

825

609

24

175.4

5.0

180.4

2019 WILL High

825

825

48.1

476

5.0

481

2020 Free

850

627

8.8

66.2

5.2

71.4

2020 WILL Intermediate

850

627

29.9

225

5.2

230

2020 WILL Low

850

627

29

218.2

5.2

223.4

2020 WILL High

850

850

61.3

625

5.2

630

Source: 2015 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal OASDI and DI Trust Funds

 

4. National poverty is measured as the number of people who live below the poverty line, below which a person would be expected to suffer from hunger as the result of the market prices of room and board. Unemployment, the number of people actively looking for work, is also a significant indicator of national poverty, however the real employment figures which indicate the percentage of the population that is actually employed is less arbitrary. In 1979, the average central city poverty rate was 15.7%, at its highest point, in 1993, it was 21.5%, by 2001 it was 16.5%, but was still over twice the rate for the suburbs, 8.2%. In 2005 it was estimated that 35-37 million people lived below the poverty line in the USA, 12.6-13.2% of the population, 4.7% were unemployed with a labor force participation rate of 66%. Census data shows that in 2010, 46.2 million Americans lived below the poverty line, and 63 million lived below 130% of the poverty line, SNAP’s gross income limit. Since the economic recession the number of people living below the poverty has increased 13.6%. It is estimated that today 15.3% of the population are poor.  Recently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics in conjunction with the U.S. Census Bureau developed a Supplemental Poverty Measure, which was released in 2011, based on a basket of goods and services, rather than merely food, that showed the incidence of poverty is somewhat higher than the official measure. In 2010, the official incidence of poverty was 15.2 percent, while it was 16 percent using the Supplemental Measure. In 2010, the poverty rate for the elderly was 9 percent officially but 15.9 percent with the new definition. The increase is due primarily to the much higher medical costs borne by older men and women. The poverty rate for working age adults is estimated to have gone down to 10%. The number of children raised in poverty continues to rise. In 2016 an estimated 24% of children under the age of 18, around 14 million children, nearly 1 in 4 US children, were growing up in poverty, the highest rate in the industrialized world. In Finland, the number is about 2.8%; Norway, 3.4%; Sweden, maybe 4.2%, Switzerland, 6.8%, Netherlands in second place at 9.8%. Of 18-to-64-year olds 20.5 million, 11.1% were poor and of people 65 and older 3.6 million, 10.1% were poor in 2011.

 

100% of the Federal Poverty Level Guidelines 2016

 

Family Size

Annual

Monthly

Weekly

1

$11,880

$990

$228

2

$16.020

$1,335

$308

3

$20,160

$1,680

$388

4

$24,300

$2,025

$467

5

$28,440

$2,370

$547

6

$32,580

$2,715

$627

7

$36,730

$3,061

$706

8

$40,890

$3,408

$786

Each additional

$4,160

$347

$80

Source: HHS 2016

5. The poverty line in 2016 was $11,880 for a family of one, $16,020 for a family of two, $20,160 for a family of three and $24,300 for a family of four. For an individual, at $733 a month in 2016 SSI pays $9,276 a year plus automatic eligibility for as much a $200 a month food card, another $2,400 annually, $11,676, still a little below the $11,880 poverty line and quite hungry for the food bank, free clothes, but eligible for free Medicaid. For a couple, at $1,100 a month, $13,200 a year, plus around $2,400 in food stamps, $15,600 a year plus free Medicaid, only $420 less than the poverty line.  At an estimated $1,350 a month for a family of three annual earnings would be $16,200, exactly enough for the poverty for a family of two, but $4,000 less than the $20,160 poverty line. With a full benefit of $733 a month plus the $1,100 for a couple a family of three would receive $1,833 a month, $21,996 a year, $1,836 more than the poverty line on SSI alone.  The poverty line was in 2016 $11,880 for a family of one, $16,020 for a family of two, $20,160 for a family of three and $24,300 for a family of four. For an individual, at $733 a month in 2016 SSI pays $9,276 a year plus automatic eligibility for as much a $200 a month food card, another $2,400 annually, $11,676, still a little below the $11,880 poverty line and quite hungry for the food bank, free clothes, but eligible for free Medicaid. For a couple, at $1,100 a month, $13,200 a year, plus around $2,400 in food stamps, $15,600 a year plus free Medicaid, only $420 less than the poverty line. Because additional family members cost less than individuals only $1,524 per year, $127 a month, paying families of children growing up below the poverty line may not be so very expensive after At an estimated $1,350 a month for a family of three annual earnings would be $16,200, exactly enough for the poverty for a family of two, but $4,000 less than the $20,160 poverty line. With a full benefit of $733 a month plus the $1,100 for a couple a family of three would receive $1,833 a month, $21,996 a year, $1,836 more than the poverty line on SSI alone. SSA program rules must not think to impoverish families making less than 150 percent of the federal poverty line.  Furthermore, disability determination needs to be abolished under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995.

 

6. The reason for the higher levels of child poverty than poverty in other age groups is that the number of TANF beneficiaries has declined dramatically from a high of nearly 14.2 million beneficiaries in 1993 to little less than 5 million families in 2003 after the Personal Responsibility and World Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 deprived families of 10 million relief benefits under 18USC§246. Furthermore minimum wages have stagnated and need to be legislated so that they automatically increase 3% annually so that wages keep up with average inflation of the consumer price index (CPI) and do not result in layoffs after decadent minimum wage hikes. From 2006 to 2011 the percentage of children living below the official poverty line increased from 18% to 22%, and when the “near poor” are included, the percentage has changed from 40% to 45% - almost half – of all children in the Untied States under the age of 18. The statistics are even worse for younger children: 49% of children under 3 years of age and 48% of those between 3 and 5 years of age are currently living in poor or near poor households. Only 10% of children living with both parents were below the poverty line whereas 40% living with only one parent were below the poverty line. Children living only with their mothers were twice as likely to live in poverty as those living only with their fathers. Housing instability and homelessness among children and youth continues to rise. Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth are homeless in a given year, and over 50% were not attending school regularly. The McKinney-Vento Homeless assistance act of 1987 was amended in 2001 for Part B to provide education for homeless children and youth.  In 2004 in the U.S. an estimated 14 million parents had custody of 21.6 million children under 21 years of age while the other parent lived somewhere else.  28% of children live in single parent household as the result of the dramatic increase in divorce rate to 50% of all marriages in the 1990s.  In 1999 there were 2.2 million marriages and 1.1 million divorces.  In 2001, 6.9 million custodial parents were due an average of $5,000.  An aggregate of $34.9 billion of payments were due and about $21.9 billion (62.6%) were received, averaging $3,200 per custodial-parent family, another $900 million were volunteered by parents without current awards or agreements. The prioritize payment of poor children the United States needs uphold the International Labor Organization (ILO) Holidays with Pay Convention (Convention 132) of 1970; Workers with Family Responsibilities (Convention 156) of 1981, and Maternity Protection (Convention 183) of 2000 with a Maternity Leave Act.

 

Human Service Budget Summary FY 2016-17

 

FY 2016

FY 2017

Change

% Change

Administration for Children and Families

Child Support and Family Support

4,304

4,555

69

1.6%

Children's Research and Technical Assistance BA

34.4

107

72.5

211%

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program

3,390

3,769

379

11.2%

Child Care and Development Block Grant

2,761

2,962

200

7.2%

Children's and Family Services Programs BA

11, 234

11,735

501

4.45%

Refugee and Entrant Assistance

1,675

2,185

510

30.5%

Total, ACF Discretionary Programs

19,120

19,952

832

4.4%

Temporary Assistance For Needy Families BA

17,345

20,097

2,752

15.9%

Total Mandatory Program BA

34,277

43.051

8,774

25.6%

Total ACF BA

53

63

10

18%

Administration for Community Living (ACL)

Health and Independence for Older Adults

1,256

1,280

24

1.9%

Caregiver & Family Support Services

176

178

1

0.9%

Vulnerable Adults

50

52

2

4.0%

Disability Programs

385

385

0

0

Consumer Information, Access & Outreach

139

139

--

0

Total, Program Level

2,048

2,076

+28

1.4%

Full-Time Equivalents

206

234

+28

13.6%

Less Funds from Other Sources

-83

-83

--

0

Total ACL Budget Authority 

1,965

1,993

28

1.4%

Total ACF BA

53,397

63,002

9,606

18%

Total Human Services BA

55,362

64.995

9,634

17.4%

Source: Administration for Children and Families All Purpose Table FY 2017 no FTE data, ACL Budget FY 2017

 

7. Child welfare must grow rapidly to eliminate 24% child poverty. Health spending and state subsidies growth however must be limited to 2.5% annually. Because ACF spending is mostly state subsidies, in the future it is hoped that ACF agency spending growth will be limited to 2.5% annually, but it would not be wise for Congress to deny the President's, possibly inept, attention to the nation's undeniable child welfare priority. Will pay for free wifi and electricity in city parks. To maximize utility Congress should request that ACF be an independent agency with SSA so that the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) could change their name to Public Health Department (PHD) and budget for the trillion dollar federal health spending limit until national health expenditure is less than 10% of GDP. The Administration for Children and Families, the ACF administers more than 60 human services programs with a budget of more than $53 billion, making it the second largest agency in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The FY 2017 President’s Budget request for the Administration for Children and Families, including both mandatory (pre-appropriated and entitlement) and discretionary programs, is $63 billion in budget authority – an increase of $9.8 billion from the FY 2016 enacted level, 18.5% growth. This spending growth must not be questioned by Congress.  It is absolutely essential for the United States to support child welfare to make right the loss of 10 million permanent AFDC benefits. Families with an adult who has received federally-funded assistance under TANF for five cumulative years are not typically eligible for more.TANF benefits are too temporary to make lasting reductions in child poverty. There is nothing wrong with dramatically increasing TANF benefits 15.4% this once. The TANF program definitely requires review. The job placement requirement statistics are poor substitute for beneficiary data and are unconstitutional on the basis of involuntary servitude. Welfare dependency is not a crime, deprivation of relief benefits is a crime 18USC§246. Because ACF spending, and most of the new and old TANF, spending seems to be earmarked to support professionals rather than beneficiaries, they are not administratively efficient welfare programs. State Departments of Human Services aren't aware that they receive any assistance from ACF. As a matter of administrative efficiency, since the sabotage of AFDC benefits by the Clinton administration, it seems best to make up for majority of the shortfall in child welfare benefits, with a historic expansion of SSI benefits, prioritizing 14 million child SSI benefits, aiming to reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty in schools, or end poverty by 2020 if there is no continuing maximum allowable deficit (mad). In 2015 about 1.8 million children received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits of $733. Estimating 5 million TANF beneficiaries receiving about $17.2 billion annually that only comes out to about $3,440 per family. Furthermore, these benefits do not last longer than five years. SSI paid $8,796 annually in 2015.  SSI is more administratively efficient and permanent solution than TANF, that only last five years, for reducing child poverty, a condition that is likely to last 18 years if their mother is poor at the time of becoming eligible for maternity leave.

 

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation and Costs

 

(Data as of June 5, 2015)

 

   

   

Average Benefit Per Person 

   

All Other Costs 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year

Average Participation

Total Benefits

Total Costs

 

   

--Thousands--

--Dollars--

     ----------Millions of Dollars----------

 

2013

47,636

133.07

76,066.32

3,866.98

79,933.30

 

2014

46,536

125.35

69,999.81

4,130.17

74,129.98

 

Source: Food and Nutrition Service (FNS)

 

8. The USDA has totally deprived more than a million people of their food stamp benefits and cut nearly everyone’s benefits since October 31, 2013.  There were 47.6 million SNAP beneficiaries at a cost of $79.9 billion in October 2013 and 46.5 million beneficiaries at a cost of $74.1 billion in 2014 a reduction of 1.1 million beneficiaries.  During the Great Recession the number of food stamp beneficiaries rose dramatically from 28.4 million in 2008 to 44.7 million in 2011 at a total cost of $37.6 billion and $75.7 billion respectively, but since October 2013 more than a million beneficiaries have lost their benefits.  The 2008 farm bill (H.R. 2419, the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008) was enacted May 22, 2008 through an override of the President’s veto. The new law increased the commitment to Federal food assistance programs by more than $10 billion over the next 10 years. In efforts to fight stigma, the law changed the name of the Federal program to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP as of Oct. 1, 2008, and changed the name of the Food Stamp Act of 1977 to the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 promising not to cut benefits.  Additional Recovery Act funds were terminated as of October 31, 2013 in accordance with an illegitimate Republican interpretation of section 442 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-296).  The cuts were deep and totalitarian, as has happened so many times before under the Food Stamp Act of 1977, the bureaucracy went agro, SNAP beneficiaries did not get the tenure promised by Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 H.R. 2419, and the longest uninterrupted growth in good stamp from the Farm Bill of 2002 was brought to end.  USDA and FNS must not cut SNAP benefits anymore.  SNAP benefits must grow 3% annually. 

 

 SMI Part B Premium Inflation 1967-2016

 

Year

Monthly Premium

% Change from Prior Year

Year

Monthly Premium

% Change from Prior Year

1967

3.00

100%

1992

31.80

6.4%

1968

4.00

33.3%

1993

36.60

15.1%

1969

4.00

0

1994

41.10

12.3%

1970

4.00

0

1995

46.10

12.2%

1971

5.30

17.5%

1996

42.50

-7.8%

1972

5.60

5.7%

1997

43.80

3.1%

1973

5.80

3.6%

1998

43.80

0

1974

6.30

6.4%

1999

45.50

3.9%

1975

6.70

6.3%

2000

45.50

0

1976

6.70

0

2001

50.00

9.9%

1977

7.20

7.5%

2002

54.00

8%

1978

7.70

6.9%

2003

58.70

8.7%

1979

8.20

6.5%

2004

66.60

13.5%

1980

8.70

6.1%

2005

78.20

17.4%

1981

9.60

10.3%

2006

88.50

13.2%

1982

11.00

14.6%

2007

93.50

5.6%

1983

12.20

10.9%

2008

96.40

3.1%

1984

14.60

19.7%

2009

96.40

0

1985

15.50

6.2%

2010

110.50

14.6%

1986

15.50

0

2011

115.40

4.4%

1987

17.90

15.5%

2012

99.90

-13.4%

1988

24.80

38.6%

2013

104.90

5%

1989

31.90

28.6%

2014

104.90

0

1990

28.60

-10.3%

2015

104.90

0

1991

29.90

4.5%

2016

159.30 or

107.50

51.9% or 2.5%

Source: 2015 Medicare Report Table V.E2 SMI Cost Sharing and Premium Amounts pg. 203 $110.15

 

9. The CMS Actuary writes, Medicare Part B premiums may vary from the standard rate because a hold-harmless provision can lower the premium rate for individuals who have their premiums deducted from their Social Security benefits. On an individual basis, this provision limits the dollar increase in the Part B premium to the dollar increase in the individual’s Social Security benefit, the person affected pays a lower Part B premium, and the net amount of the individual’s Social Security benefit does not decrease despite the greater increase in the premium. Because of the adverse “no COLA” declaration for 2016 there was no increase in costs, however Table VE2 SMI Cost-sharing and Premium Amounts is the cruelest and most unusual cost increase ever. Income thresholds used for determining the income-related monthly adjustment amounts to be paid by beneficiaries, resulting in a greater number of beneficiaries paying the higher amounts. In addition, beginning in 2020, the legislation adjusted the methodology used to index the thresholds, and accordingly more beneficiaries will be subject to the income-related premiums. In 2014 the initial threshold is $85,000 for an individual tax return and $170,000 for a joint return. The thresholds are not indexed to inflation in the years 2011 through 2019 but are indexed thereafter. Individuals exceeding the threshold will pay premiums covering 35, 50, 65, or 80 percent of the average program cost for aged beneficiaries, depending on their income level, compared to the standard premium covering 25 percent. Because Social Security beneficiary Cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) are going to be set at 3% by law, and in fact are only sometimes so generous, and there was a wrongful “no COLA” pronouncement despite 300% OASDI trust fund ratio for 2016, it is necessary that annual Medicare premiums cost increases be less than that, 2.5% projects efficient growth, 2.5% Medicare premium growth from three years at $104.90 in 2015 to $107.50 in 2016, instead of $159.30, would enable the prospective social security beneficiaries of the Free Disability Insurance Reallocation Tax (DIRT) and 3% Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) Act of January 1, 2016, to honor the hold-harmless provision, without years of negative, zero or unsustainably 0.5% growth. The 2.5% health annuity liability law must be applied to the Premiums advertised for the rich, but dishonored completely by Social Security beneficiaries who got “no COLA”, so that CMS is liable to credit the consumer for their overpayment. The monthly difference between $159.30 and $107.50 is $51.80 in consumer credit that would reduce premiums for the so-called rich non-beneficiaries, who agreed to pay, to $55.7 per month that they overpaid. If they chose to discontinue their Medicare Part B policy now they could collect cash but might face reinsurance penalties under current law. The CMS Actuary should now be prepared to harmlessly complete a routine 2016 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Hospital Insurance and Federal Supplemental Medical Insurance Trust Funds in early May, in time to honor the sixth month of the calendar year by accounting for the 2.5% health annuity rule on Medicare premiums with compensation.  

 

Federal Budget by Agency FY 2015 2000-2020 (Millions)

 

 

2000

2015 OMB

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Executive Office of the President

283

 

506

519

532

545

559

573

Legislative Branch

2,871

 

4,694

4,811

4,932

5,055

5,181

5,311

Judicial Branch

4,057

7,584

7,774

7,968

8,167

8,371

8,581

Postal Service

0

0

21,115

21,643

22,184

22,739

23,307

Department of Agriculture

75,071

 

139,727

143,500

147,088

150,765

154,534

158,397

Department of Commerce

7,788

 

9,607

9,020

9,246

9,477

9,714

9,956

Department of Defense 

281,028

584,319

495,000

495,000

495,000

495,000

495,000

Department of Education

33,476

 

76,334

70,315

72,073

73,875

75,722

77,615

Department of Energy

14,971

29,374

28,598

29,312

30,045

30,796

31,566

Department of Health and Human Services

382,311

 

1,010,384

996,000

996,000

996,000

996,000

996,000

Department of Homeland Security

13,159

 

47,456

39,155

40,134

41,137

42,166

43,220

Department of Housing and Urban Development

30,781

 

38,088

39,040

40,016

41,016

42,042

43,093

Department of the Interior

7,998

 

13,702

12,198

12,502

12,815

13,135

13,464

Department of Justice

16,846

 

33,859

22,493 

23,055

23,631

24,222

24,828

Department of Labor

31,873

68,094

54,837

56,208

57,614

59,054

60,530

Department of State

6,687

28,954

14,389

14,749

15,117

15,495

15,883

International Assistance Programs

12,087

 

21,577

37,406

38,342

39,300

40,283

41,290

Department of Transportation

41,555

 

84,252

90,900

93,173

95,502

97,890

100,337

Department of the Treasury

390,524

 

572,593

525,005

538,130

551,583

565,373

579,507

Department of Veterans Affairs

47,044

 

158,039

164,410

168,520

172,733

177,052

181,478

Corps of Engineers--Civil Works

4,229

 

7,745

7,939

8,137

8,341

8,549

8,763

Environmental Protection Agency

7,223

 

8,379

8,087

8,289

8,497

8,709

8,927

General Services Administration

74

 

408

418

429

439

450

462

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

13,428

 

18,076

17,938

18,386

18,846

19,317

19,800

National Science Foundation

3,448

 

8,103

7,436

7,622

7,813

8,008

8,208

Office of Personnel Management

48,655

 

93,362

48,000

48,000

48,000

48,000

48,000

Small Business Administration

-421

 

1,057

500

500

500

500

500

Social Security Administration (On-Budget)

45,121

 

90,398

70,000

0

0

0

0

Other Independent Agencies (On-Budget)

8,803

 

19,413

19,898

20,396

20,906

21,428

21,964

Total on-budget outlays

1,788,950

3,176,084

2,956,701

2,920,382

2,954,903

2,990,289

3,026,560

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

-105,586

 

-136,208

 

-145,297

 

-144,639

 

-145,067

 

-148,630

 

-149,793

 

Total On-budget Receipts

1,544,607

2,612,500

 

2,794,600

 

3,163,600

 

3,348,100

 

3,445,800

 

3,604,700

 

On-budget Surplus/Deficit

86,422

 

-427,326

 

-16,804

 

387,857

 

538,264

 

615,265

 

739,335

 

Source: OMB Table 4.1, Agency FY 2015 Budgets + 2.5% annual growth, surplus dedicated to ending poverty by 2020

 

10. It is estimated OMB could reduce the FY 2015 deficit $293 billion, by $190 billion if OMB accounted more accurately for agency budget requests and by the $103.4 billion that are saved by abolishing the $57.4 billion Other Defense Civil Programs, and $46 billion Allowances rows.  Provided agencies aim for 2% annual spending growth with a 3% limit, with the exception of DoD with a $500 billion spending and Health and Human Services with a $1 trillion limit, balancing the federal budget should become much easier.  The Defense budget for FY 2013 was $495.5 billion FY2013, $496 billion FY 2014 and $495.6 billion FY2015.  Military pay and benefits account for the largest share of the budget, $167.2 billion out of $495.6 billion FY2015.  The OMB estimates are much higher, $608 billion FY2013, $593 billion FY2014 and $584 billion FY2015.  The Department of Defense offers OMB the opportunity to reduce the gross federal debt with three years valued of $295.9 billion including the FY2015 deficit reduction of $88.4 billion.  OMB must account more accurately agency spending in Table 4.1. OMB must commission an annual review of agency budget requests to improve the accuracy and predictability of their accounting under Art. 2(2) of the U.S. Constitution.  There may be considerable retroactive relief due for agency budget officers who prove to OMB that their lower estimates to be more accurate than the figures in the OMB Historical Tables which are used to calculate the Deficit.  Accurate reporting is necessary to establish a baseline for predictable 2.5% annual rates of agency spending growth. The federal government usually runs on a deficit, with some famous exceptions, such as when Andrew Jackson paid off the federal debt in 1835 and more recently when Bill Clinton ran a surplus in 1998-2000, and is currently running the highest deficit in dollar terms in national history, -$1.4 trillion in 2009, and -$1.3 trillion in 2010, 2011 and 2012 and is projected to improve to -$900 million in 2013, down to -$530 billion in 2015 and going down for a short while before the accounting fraud causes the deficit to grow again by 2018. This deficit is the second highest as a percentage of GDP since WWII and the Confederacy during the Civil War.  Currently the federal budget teeters on the brink of the European definition of a solvent 3% deficit at around -$500 billion. Only when the Allowances and Other Defense Civil Programs rows are abolished from OMB Table 4.1 Outlays by Agency will OMB be morally prepared to receive agency estimates. It would take the OMB Director no more than eight hours to abolish the fictitious Allowances and Other Defense Civil Programs rows and correct the book accordingly. Only then could OMB hope to permanently balance the budget aiming for 2.5% on-budget agency spending growth. The dangling debt from the Other Defense Civil Programs and Allowances rows amounts to $360 billion debt reduction from 2009-2014 in both OMB and CBO debt accounts and $103 billion in deficit reduction 2015. OMB would avoid a 100.6% of GDP debt in 2013, 103.2% in 2014, 102.7% in 2015, 100.3% in 2017 before going down to 98.8% in 2018. The revised debt peaks at a maximum of 100.1% billion in both 2014 and 2015 before receding as the result of GDP growth before any other historical debt reduction revisions are made by agencies, so that it as if the debt had never exceeded 100% of GDP.  Another edition of the federal budget will be needed to revise public health and welfare spending estimates, to end poverty by 2020.

 

Sanders, Tony J. Book 3: Health and Welfare (HaW). 12th Ed. Hospitals & Asylums HA-24-5-16. 299 pgs.  www.title24uscode.org/haw.doc 

Test Questions www.title24uscode.org/hawtest.doc