Hospitals & Asylums    

 

 

Bureau of Economic Analysis Resolution for Fiscal Year HA-1-1-2006

 

By Tony J. Sanders

 

Will FY 2006 be a bull or bear market? Having balanced the budget in 2005 HA resolves to entertain the dispute regarding the overestimated $12.2 trillion US GDP in 2006 by reconciling the advanced economic study of the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) with the $6.4 trillion income estimates of the US Census in 2000 overshadowed by the $9 trillion public debt of the federal government so we can make progress under the 1993 System of National Accounts (SNA) or overthrow the vague regime of UN Statistics regarding the calculation of the GDP in table 2.4 by simplifying the calculation for the Gross domestic product (Per capita income x population) + Government = GDP to harmonize the national economic administration Table with the census:

 

(1) Gross domestic product (GDP) at market prices = Output + taxes, less subsidies on products intermediate consumption.

(2) Gross domestic product (GDP) at market prices = Final consumption expenditure/ actual final consumption + changes in inventories + gross fixed capital formation + acquisitions less disposals of valuables + exports of goods and services - imports of goods and services.

 

The USA must afford their citizens and the world the truth regarding the per capita GDP of $30,000, including the government administration, rather than the $40,000 in the Fact Book. This way the US could afford their 0.7% share of official development assistance by 2015, rationalize subsidies and prohibit predatory lending practices of a nation living way beyond its means.

 

Federal Agency Spending Limits Balancing the Budget and Debate between US GDP and GNI

 

Year

Def

OASI

Rev

Bud

Def

Debt

GDP

GNI

2000

294.495

411.68

2,025

1,788

87

5,628

9,719

6,400

2001

305.500

434.06

1,991

1,860

-33

5,770

10,022

6,666

2002

349.555

440.54

1,853

2,011

-317

6,198

10,339

7,000

2003

388.870

447.81

1,782

2,157

-375

6,780

10,828

6,666

2004

437.116

457.12

1,880

2,292

-412

7,355

11,552

7,500

2005

444.068

479.89

2,052

2,479

-400

8,058

12,227

7,921

2006

410.092

507.09

2,177

2,568

-390

8,448

12,907

8,078

2007

423.192

537.85

2,344

2,656

-312

8,760

13,617

8,500

2008

436.437

568.09

2,507

2,757

-251

9,010

14,349

9,000

2009

460.546

598.95

2,650

2,882

-233

9,343

15,111

9,500

2010

485.112

635.31

2,821

3,028

-207

9,530

15,906

10,000

Pro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

300

385

2,177

2,338

-160

8,218

12,907

8,078

2007

300

400

2,344

2,426

-82

8,300

13,617

8,500

2008

300

420

2,507

2,473

33

8,267

14,349

9,000

2009

300

450

2,650

2,565

84

8,183

15,111

9,500

2010

300

500

2,821

2,708

113

8,070

15,906

10,000

 

 

To balance the federal budget under Congress must adjust the Historic Tables of the OMB to limit:

 

1. Defense spending that has spiraled to an empty $444 and must be restrained to less than $300 billion annually, not more than 30% of the $1 trillion world military. The US military budget is so overdone that it can be limited to only $250 billion without evincing the slightest weakness to the international community.

2. Social Security and Medicare must be limited to cost estimated at only $385 in 2005 although $507 was budgeted. The Social Security Administration should absorb the $201 CMS Health Insurance Fund into the $1,769 and free Medicare from the DHHS and be satisfied with the $1,970 billion this 2006 To grant satisfaction with the approaching $2 trillion savings mark is seems like a good idea if these Social Security Trust Funds would be patient and wait until the federal government is turning a profit in 2008 under this plan or this 2006 with the full Congressional cooperation of all federal agencies in the beginning of FY 2006.

3. To begin addressing the $9,097 public debt honestly the federal government must re-negotiate their GDP for the benefit of creditors.

 

2005 OASDI Trustee Report

 

 

OASI

 

DI

 

HI

 

SMI

Assets (end of 2003)

$1,355.3

 

$175.4

 

$256.0

 

$24.0

Income during 2004

566.3

 

91.4

 

183.9

 

133.8

Outgo during 2004

421.0

 

80.6

 

170.6

 

138.3

  Net increase in assets

145.3

 

10.8

 

13.3

 

-4.5

Assets (end of 2004)

1,500.6

 

186.2

 

269.3

 

19.

 

With profits of $146.1 billion in 2004 and $166 billion projected for 2005 the Social Security Administration (SSA) must be held responsible for limiting the amount of social security payroll taxes they accept, depositing surplus in the general funds of the treasury. Whereas the OASI trust fund tops $1.5 trillion this year it is important that the trust fund be temporarily satisfied until the federal government balances the budget. SSA will need to account for interest revenues and adopts a needs based policy in regards to Old Age Insurance. The $1.5 Trillion in savings represents enough for all the soon to be retired baby boomers to live for two years and the economy is in little danger of instability.

 

 

OASI

 

DI

 

HI

 

SMI

Interest earnings

 

79.0

 

10.0

 

15.0

 

1.5

 

The total SSA budget of $561 billion, in particular, requires limitation to balance the solvent Trust Funds, at cost. In calculating the amount of reduction that OASI and SSA can afford the budget one should estimate a reasonable increase in expenditure over last year, subtract interest earnings yielding the amount of need. Whereas $421 billion was administrated in 2004 it can estimated that OASI will administrate $450 billion in benefits this year. $450 79 = $371 therefore SSA is recommended to limit spending to cost to encourage the national financing of community corrections and poverty elimination programs in the USA.

 

Year

OASI

Fund

DI

Fund

HI

Fund

SMI

Fund

HaW

2004

457.12

1,452

77.625

182.79

159.59

264.9

94.736

17.12

1,081

2005

479.89

1,603

81.472

192.78

161.36

274.2

115.23

18.60

1,271

2006

507.09

1,769

86.104

201.76

172.14

291.7

182.86

41.84

1,286

 

 

In 2004 the European Union, with a GDP of $11.6 Trillion was the largest donor of Official Development Assistance (ODA) with $46.5 billion, 0.4% of the GDP, it is hoped they will pay $59 billion in 2006, 0.53%. The EU is expected to reach 0.7% of their GDP by 2010 so as to make 1% contribution a possibility by 2015 to fulfill the UN Millennium Development Goals and Art. 23 of the Declaration on Social Development and Progress of 11 December 1969 by 2015. The US government currently pays an estimated $19 billion although another $33 billion is attributed to private donors who are not registered with the UN, and are not considered ODA, but should be insofar as they respect human rights and confess to the real GDP in regards to the national share of dues to the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) and the UN under Rule 160 of the Rules of Procedure of the General Assembly of 31 December 1984.

 

Click Continent

Population

GDP in billion

Per capita

2006 ODA

Government

Africa

Sub-Saharan

717,020,013

1,216.764

$1,700

$6,439 (2003) +

$25,000 (2005) = $31,500

African Union

America

885,909,568

$13,324

$15,038

-$35,000

$10,000

Organization of American States

Europe

737,567,222

14,283

$19,379

-$46,499

$13,824

European Union

Middle East & Central Asia

1,783,490,718

$6,672

$3,742

-$359

$16,674

Organization of Islamic Conferences

South East Asia

2,335,877,452

$16,400

$6,474

-$15,773

$25,500

Association of South East Asian States

World

6,446,131,400

$52,900

 

$8,207

-$97,631

$97,499

United Nations

 

Health and Welfare Tables: www.title24uscode.org/stat2005.doc

 

Beginning of 2005 Appropriations Bills www.title24uscode.org/balancedbudget.doc

 

Certificate of Service Title24uscode@aol.com . Done this 3rd Day of January 2006.

 

Sanders, Tony J. Hospitals & Asylums. Bureau of Economic Analysis Resolution. HA-1-1-06 www.title24uscode.org/balancedbudget2006.htm