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To supplement Chapter 4 Saint Elizabeth’s Hospital and transfer §321-329 from Chapter 9 Hospitalization of the Mentally Ill National Returned from Foreign Countries to Article 11 §200-208 of this book. To graduate US Customs from the Department of Homeland Security (HS), Military Department (MD) from Department of Defense (DoD) and Public Health Department from Health and Human Services (HHS). To abolish psychiatry, civil commitment, psychiatric drugs, and all psychiatric hospitals, other than forensic or veteran’s, and prescribe Amantadine (Symmetrel) for flu and psychiatric drug tics. To abolish the word 'enforcement' in federal education statute under the Slavery Convention of 1926 (a) 'enforcement of Section 111' at 20USC§112 needs to be repealed under the 21st Amendment (1933) and, (b) the words 'enforcement of' must be removed from the caption of Part 1200 so that it states, Nondiscrimination on the basis of Handicap in programs or activities conducted by the National Council on Disability, at the end of Education statute 34CFR§1200.170, and (c) General Definitions of the Office of Museum and Library Services at 20USC§9101(1) inappropriately applying the piracy (ahoy.one) of pornography to college and public library wifi must be replaced with (1) No stalking in the library 18USC§2261A(2). 25% of the world population, about 1.3 billion students were enrolled in school, in 2004. There are more than 70 million students in the US. About 98,000 elementary and secondary schools have 50 million students in attendance and 3.3 million teachers starting at $30k and earning more than $44k on average. A steadily increasing percentage of children, 3.4%, 1.7 million children were homeschooled in 2012. About 20 million students attend nearly 7,400 institutions of higher education who employed 3.9 million employees, including more than 1.1 million college professors with median earnings of around $89k per year. $209 billion in federal aid are available FY 2017. Total ED on-budget spending spiked at $88.3 billion in 2015, $78.5 billion in 2016 and $79.5 billion in 2017. ED on-budget spending should grow around 2.5% annually to $82 billion in 2018 and continue to grow to $84 billion in 2019 and $86 billion in 2020. Public school teachers should be enabled to contribute, on an individual and voluntary basis, the menopause as disability (mad) tax rate, and contribute to the legislation of 14 weeks of unemployment compensation for maternity leave. Despite $11,100 per pupil education spending >$718 billion is rated the second highest of any nation, child poverty is higher in the United States than any other country, gradual improvement is lagging in international rank. In 2016 24% of children under the age of 18, around 14 million-24 million, were growing up in poverty, the highest rate in any industrialized nation. Of 18-to-64-year olds 20.5 million, 11.1% were poor and of people 65 and older 3.6 million, 10.1% were poor in 2011, although after medical expenses is said to be the same as the overall poverty rate more than 15.4%. Before TANF beneficiaries declined from 14.2 million in 1993 to less than 5 million families today child poverty was estimated to be around the national average. To compensate the US must tax the rich the full 12.4% OASDI tax rate to expand the SSI program from 1.8 million children and 6.5 million adults in 2015 to pay the families of 16-24 million children and 30 million adults living below the poverty line in the United States by 2020.

Be the Democratic and Republican (DR) two party system Abolished

 

1st Ed. Aug. 2004, 2nd May 2005 3rd 28 Feb. 2007, 4th 31 July 2007, 5th 20 April 2009, 6th 16 March 2011, 7th 7 March 2013, 8th 7 April 2015, 9th 27 March 2016, 10th 11 April 2017

 

1. This chapter supplements Title 24 USC Chapter 4 St. Elizabeth’s Hospital §161-230 by replacing the repealed Subchapters I Establishment And Management; Pensions, Moneys, And Appropriations and; Subchapter II Inmates; Burden Of Expenses Thereof; Detention Of Insane; and amending Subchapter III Mental Health System for the District of Columbia. Sections 321-329 of Chapter 9 Hospitalization of the Mentally Ill National Returned from Foreign Countries, are transferred to Article 11 Sections 200-208 of this Chapter to help exchange students make it home safely. The purpose of this supplemental to St. Elizabeth's hospital statute is to host the graduation of US Customs from the Department of Homeland Security (HS) Military Department (MD) from Department of Defense (DoD) and Public Health Department from Health and Human Services (HHS). To expand Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for the Aged, Blind and Disabled under Sec. 1635 of Title XVI of the Social Security Act as codified at 42USC§1383d that currently pays 1.8 million juveniles under Sullivan v. Zebley, 493US521(1990) to pay the families of an estimated 16-24 million children growing up below the poverty line.  To encourage school districts to balance their budget, provide poor and nearly poor families of an estimated 24 million children with food banks, showers, free clothing, laundry and necessities operated by student volunteers under 24USC(10) §422(d-1).  To enable public school teachers, and other state employees, insured for Old Age under Title I the Social Security Act, to contribute, on an individual and voluntary basis, to pay the DI menopause as disability tax rate, at the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 rate of 2.37% (2016-18) or actual rate of 2.4% (2017) and 2.2% (2018) under Sec. 201(b)(1)(S) of Title II of the Social Security Act 42USC(7)II§40. To legislate 14 weeks of Unemployment Compensation (UC) for 'Maternity Leave' amending expired Section 305 of Title III of the Social Security Act 42USC§505 to fulfill the ILO Maternity Protection Convention 183 (2000).  To stabilize federal education department spending at 2.5-3% annual growth from $80 billion FY 2017, a good year, until 2020 when education spending would be considered stabilized and would receive 3% in-kind welfare spending growth as a rule.  To draft a UNESCO North American Convention on the Recognition of Studies, Certificates, Diplomas and Degrees and other Academic Qualifications in Higher Education, (a) to raise the bar on the US Foreign Service Exam to a Bachelor's degree in international relations, global affairs, geography, economics and foreign language(s), (b) to lower US bar exams and public defender pay, on a brief-by-brief basis, to the Bachelor of law degree and raise the bar for judges to juris doctor.  Schools can close temporarily or permanently. Reasons for temporary school closure are severe weather, utility outage, pandemic, fire, or terrorist congresses.

 

2. Among children not yet in school, the proportion in parental care only declines with age, with 30 percent of children less than a year old cared for solely by a parent, and 22 percent of children at ages three to four. Care at home by a relative or non-relative shows a similar pattern, with 30 and 20 percent of children under a year old receiving at-home care by a relative or non-relative, respectively; among children ages three to four, these figures are 22 and 11 percent, respectively. Use of center-based programs increases as children get older, with 15 percent of those under one year, 26 percent of those one to two years, and 30 percent of those three to four years in this type of care, in 2011.  Among children ages birth through four whose mother is employed, black children are least likely to be in parental care, at 17 percent, while Hispanic children are most likely, at 29 percent. Black children are most likely to be in center-based care, at 31 percent, while Hispanic children are least likely, at 14 percent. Both black and Hispanic children are more likely to be cared for by a relative in the home, at 35 and 36 percent, respectively, than are their white and Asian peers (at 24 and 25 percent, respectively). However, white and Asian children are more likely to be cared for in a home by a non-relative (at 16 and 15 percent, respectively), compared with 11 percent of Hispanic children, and 8 percent of black children. Poor and low-income children, ages birth to four, who have employed mothers are less likely to be in a center-based program than are children in families with incomes at least twice the federal poverty level (19 and 22 percent, respectively, versus 29 percent, in 2011). Children whose mothers have less education are less likely to be in non-parental care during their mother’s working hours. Fifty-eight percent of children whose mothers lack a high school diploma, compared with 70 percent of those whose mothers have a college degree or more, use non-parental care as their primary form of childcare. Young children experience various types of early care and education environments the year before they enter kindergarten. Some children attend center-based arrangements such as preschools, childcare centers, or Head Start programs, while others are cared for in relatives’ or nonrelatives’ homes or are normally cared for only by their parents. The overall percentage of children ages 4 and 5 years old who attended center-based care as their primary early care and education (ECE) arrangement before kindergarten entry was higher in 2012 than in 1995 (58 vs. 55 percent), while the percentage of children who primarily received home-based nonrelative care as their primary ECE arrangement was lower in 2012 than in 1995 (7 vs. 11 percent). The overall percentages of children receiving home-based relative care as their primary ECE arrangement (13 percent) and those with no ECE arrangement on a regular basis (19 percent) in 2012 were not measurably different from the percentages in 1995.

 

3. 25% of the world population, about 1.3 billion students were enrolled in school, in 2004. There are more than 70 million students in the US. About 98,000 elementary and secondary schools have 50 million students in attendance and 3.3 million teachers starting at $30k and earning more than $44k on average. A steadily increasing percentage of children, 3.4%, 1.7 million children were homeschooled in 2012. About 20 million students attend nearly 7,400 institutions of higher education who employed 3.9 million employees, including more than 1.1 million college professors with median earnings of around $89k per year. $209 billion in federal aid are available FY 2017. Total ED on-budget spending spiked at $88.3 billion in 2015, $78.5 billion in 2016 and $79.5 billion in 2017. ED on-budget spending should grow around 2.5% annually to $82 billion in 2018 and continue to grow to $84 billion in 2019 and $86 billion in 2020. Public school teachers should be enabled to contribute, on an individual and voluntary basis, the menopause as disability (mad) tax rate, and contribute to the legislation of 14 weeks of unemployment compensation for maternity leave. At $11,100 per pupil spending the United States has the highest level of education spending in the world. Over the past 30 years, average per-pupil expenditures for public elementary and secondary schools have nearly doubled, rising from $3,367 in 1970 to $6,584 in 2000 to over $11,100 today. The average private school tuition nationwide, according to a 1996 Cato Institute study, was $3,116, with 67 percent of all private elementary and secondary schools charging $2,500 or less. Total K-12 federal, state, and local spending for Education, both public and private, climbed to over $420 billion for the 2000-2001 school year.  More than 70 million people attend school in the United States. In the United States there are about 90,000 elementary and secondary schools with nearly 50 million students in attendance. About 20 million students attend nearly 7,400 institutions of higher education who employed 3.9 million employees in fall 2011. More than 1.1 million college professors in the are paid anywhere from $50k to $158k per year, but median earnings come to around $89k per year. Public schools employ more than 3.1 million full-time teachers. The pupil per teacher ratio is 16.1. A steadily increasing percentage of children, 3.4%, 1.7 million children were homeschooled in 2012.  Graduation rates are at an all-time high—82 percent. African-Americans dropout rates cut by 45 percent. Latino dropout rates cut in half, from 28 to 14 percent. 11.2% of the US population drops out of high school. Of those dropouts, 10.5% are white, 11.3% are black and 29.5% are Hispanic. In 1978 whites still made up 80 percent of America's population, including almost three-fourths of those under 18. But minorities now constitute more than 36 percent of the total population and are on track to become a majority of the youth population before 2020. Federal figures show that nonwhites comprised 47 percent of the 2011 class entering higher education, up from one-third in 1996. From 1994 to 2006 African-American and Hispanic students increased from one-fifth to one-third of the enrollment at community colleges, and from one-sixth to two-fifths at the four-year schools rated least selective. Yet in the upper-rung universities considered very or most competitive, the combined black/Hispanic share remained stuck at only about 12 percent.  Overall Grade Point Averages (GPAs) increased from 2.68 in 1990 to 3.00 in 2009 but did not increase from 2005 to 2009. Among the individual core academic courses, the only significant increase in graduates’ GPAs from 2005 to 2009 was in English, which increased from an average of 2.82 in 2005 to 2.85 in 2009. On average, graduates earned lower GPAs in mathematics and science than in English and social studies. In 2009, female graduates had a GPA of 3.10 compared to 2.90 for male graduates.

 

OMB Estimated Federal Education Spending Growth 1962-2020

(millions)

 

Year

1962

1963

1964

OMB Estimate

816

985

973

% Annual Growth

17.2%

-1.2%

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1,152

2,416

3,596

4,072

3,990

4,594

5,099

15.5%

52.3%

32.8%

11.9%

-2%

13.1%

9.8%

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

5,537

5,709

5,747

7,331

7,897

8,717

9,828

7.9%

3%

0.7%

21.6%

7.2%

9.4%

11.3%

1979

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

12,167

14,612

16,973

14,707

14,433

15,424

16,596

19.2%

16.7%

13.9%

-15.4%

-1.9%

6.4%

7.1%

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

17,577

16,670

18,145

21,468

22,972

25,196

25,832

5.6%

-5.4%

8.1%

15.5%

6.5%

8.8%

2.5%

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

30,109

24,557

31,205

29,727

30,009

31,294

31,285

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

33,476

35,523

46,373

57,145

62,780

72.858

93,368

6.5%

5.8%

23.4%

18.9%

9%

13.8%

22%

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

66,372

65,963

53,389

93,743

65,484

57,249

40,910

-40.7%

-0.6%

-23.6%

43.1%

-43.2%

-14.4%

-39.9%

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

59,610

103,288

68,506

73,669

80,852

88,426

94,971

31.4%

42.3%

-50.8%

7%

8.9%

8.6%

6.9%

Source: OMB Table 4.1 (2015)

 

4. ED and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) need to stabilize federal education spending growth at 3% annually to be competent and, more than most agencies, ED must reconcile ED budget and OMB ED on-budget spending estimates to reduce historical deficits and national debt under Art. 2(2) of the United States Constitution. Federal education spending growth needs to be stabilized at less than 3% a year, aiming for 2.5% - 3% like other agencies, 3% growth seems right for in-kind welfare, and should never be negative. Since the 1980s inflation in consumer prices has averaged less than 3%, 2.7% in the intermediate term. Minimum wage workers, federal employees, agencies, social security beneficiaries, teachers, everyone, need to legislate a 3% annual raise, to prevent attrition. ED is probably the worst offender, of any agency, when it comes to the reporting of irregular budget fluctuations by OMB. Federal education spending growth must be regulated at 2.5-3% annually to establish administrative control and should stabilize at 3% by 2020 because everyone knows that ED spending is a form of in-kind welfare. The federal Education Department (ED) provides about 12% of nearly $1 trillion in annual education spending. Adding discretionary and mandatory spending brings total ED spending to $88.3 billion in 2015, $78.5 billion in 2016 and $79.5 billion in 2017. There is also another $50 billion or so in student loan repayments recirculated as student loans. OMB estimates education spending of $103.3 billion in 2015, $68.5 billion in 2016 and $73.7 billion in 2017. This is a difference of $15 billion in 2015, - $10 billion in 2016, and $5.8 billion in 2017, a margin of error of 17% in 2015, 12.7% in 2016 and 7.3% in 2017. Federal education spending growth needs to be stabilized at less than 3% a year, aiming for 2.5% like other agencies, and should never be negative. 1973 and 1974 seem to be the only years that positive ED spending growth was reported to be less than 3% by OMB historical tables. ED's staff of 4,169, nearly 45 percent below the 7,528 employees who administered Federal education programs in several different agencies in 1980 when the Department was founded. Real spending growth might be better than 1.3% between 2016 and 2017 to help pay the employer portion of teacher disability contributions and help schools provide poor children with free clothing and food bank with a total of $80 billion in discretionary and so-called mandatory federal spending in 2017 by which time mandatory spending fluctuations should be abolished and total ED spending should grow around 2.5% to $82 billion in 2018 and continue to grow to $84 billion in 2019 and $86 billion in 2020.

 

Federal Education Spending 2014-2017

(in thousands of dollars)

 

Program

2015

2016

2015-16 Growth

2017

2016-17 Growth

2018 2.5% Growth

Elementary and Secondary Education

37,086,454

38,190,710

3.00%

38,817,005

1.6%

39,770,000

Post-secondary

26,532,161

26,593,507

0.40%

26,800,522

0.8%

27,470,535

Total Discretionary Spending

67,135,576

68,306,763

1.80%

69,388,269

1.6%

71,122,976

Total Mandatory Spending

20,377,890

10,171,706

-50.00%

10,087,260

-0.8%

10,339,442

Total ED Spending

87,513,466

78,478,469

-10.20%

79,475,529

1.3%

81,462,417

OMB ED on-budget Estimate

103,288,000

68,506,000

-33.7%

73,669,000

7.5%

75,510,725

Source: ED FY 2017 Budget

 

5. Approximately $249 billion in total funds from Federal, State, institutional, and private sources were used to help finance postsecondary expenses for AY 2014-2015. The Federal Government provided about 68 percent of all these funds, while State, institutional, and private sources (i.e., non-Federal) provided about 32 percent. For every dollar devoted to instruction, the amount spent on higher education administration has increased over the years from 19 cents in 1929 to 33 cents in 1959-60 to almost 50 cents by the end of the century. University presidents often command multi-million salaries the school can ill-afford resulting in tuition hikes, faculty cuts and ultimately cheaper, more academically motivated Presidents. From 1982-84 to 2010, college tuition and fees (unadjusted for inflation) rose by 439 percent, health-care costs increased by 251 percent, median faculty incomes grew by 147 percent, and the consumer price index climbed by 106 percent. Between 1978 and 2008 middle-income families saw their income grow only 15 percent, while families in the top 20 percent saw their incomes rise by 52 percent and families in the top 5 percent enjoyed a 78 percent increase. The amount that colleges charge varies widely from an average of only $2,960 at public community colleges in 2011-12 to $28,500 at private four-year colleges.  Professional schools cost even more $100,000 for law school and $150,000 medical school.  Most of the Department’s 100-plus programs are funded through discretionary appropriation acts enacted each fiscal year. However, there are many education programs—some of them large—that are funded directly through their authorizing statutes. For many budgeting purposes, these programs are classified as mandatory. The Direct Loan program is the largest mandatory program in the Department. The Direct Loan program will make an estimated $96.9 billion in loans to postsecondary students and their families in fiscal year 2016. However, the appropriation for these loans is not $96.9 billion. Instead, under the Credit Reform Act, the appropriation is the amount necessary to subsidize the loan volume for the life of the cohort of loans made in the fiscal year, and the subsidy costs are discounted using a net present value calculation. When there are no positive subsidies, the appropriation would be zero. In 2016, these subsidy costs include the Government’s cost of obtaining $96.9 billion, the cost to defray the in-school interest for needy undergraduates, an allowance for defaults, and other factors. These are offset by collections of fees, interest, and principal repayments. In some years, after reflecting the time value of money, or the “re-estimate” of prior year loans required by the Credit Reform Act, the estimated receipts exceed the cost of the subsidizing the loans. When added together with other mandatory programs, the negative appropriations from the estimated receipts for student loans produce Department totals that appear to understate the annual appropriations for discretionary and mandatory programs. Other mandatory programs include Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants, a portion of Pell Grants, and a variety of smaller programs and activities. The mandatory funding for Pell Grants comes from several laws, including SAFRA, the Budget Control Act of 2011, and appropriation acts. Some of the mandatory Pell Grant funding is specified in these laws, and some fluctuates based on inflation and program participation. The 21st amendment (1933) requires better repeal to stop perpetuating the construction of the 18th amendment (1919), such as notation in brackets so that [both amendments] are completely repealed. Pediatrics brings the 21 year-age for alcohol and marijuana purchases into question because the driving age is 16 and so many teenagers die in automobile accidents and children cannot afford to either be deprived of anymore of their rights or die a wrongful death. Although marijuana is safer than alcohol, it causes diverticulitis when eaten, and young children have needed to be hospitalized. Cigarettes are so addictive that only young teenagers are foolish enough to start using them. Teenagers should probably be learning to drink alcohol and smoke marijuana responsibly at 16, before purchasing cigarettes and pornography at 18 and owning an automobile or firearm at 21. Although rapid growth may stop by 16 or 17 neuron and body growth may continue as long as 19 year of age. Growth is thought to dangerously impair a teenagers' ability to learn to drive a car safely until age 20. 'Enforcement' offends the 'forced labor' provisions of the Slavery Convention of 1926 and needs to be repealed throughout education statute (a) 'enforcement of Section 111' at 20USC§112 needs to be repealed under the 21st Amendment (1933) and, (b) the words 'enforcement of' must be repealed from the caption of Part 1200 so that it simply states, Nondiscrimination on the basis of Handicap in programs or activities conducted by the National Council on Disability to comply with the end of Education at 34CFR§1200.170, and (c) General Definitions of the Office of Museum and Library Services at 20USC§9101(1) pertaining to pornography replaced with (1) No stalking in the library 18USC§2261A.

 

6. Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for children and adolescents. In 2014, 35 percent of deaths among adolescents ages 15–19 and 30 percent of deaths among children ages 1–14 were due to unintentional injuries. For both age groups, motor-vehicle-related (MVR) injury deaths are the leading type of unintentional injury death. Compared with younger children, adolescents have much higher death rates overall and from injuries, and are much more likely to die from injuries sustained in motor vehicle traffic crashes. In 2014, the reported MVR deaths rates for American Indian or Alaska Native children under age 20 were more than double the rates for White, non-Hispanic; Black, non-Hispanic; Asian or Pacific Islander, non-Hispanic; and Hispanic children under age 20. In 2014, the MVR death rate for children ages „ 1–14 was 2.2 deaths per 100,000 population, representing 1,234 deaths. MVR death rates for Black, non-Hispanic (2.8); White, non- Hispanic (2.0); and Hispanic (2.2) children ranged from 2 to 3 deaths per 100,000 population. Among adolescents, the MVR death rate in 2014 was 11.9 deaths per 100,000 population, a total of 2,515 deaths. The MVR death rate for White, non-Hispanic (13.0) adolescents was higher than the rates for Black, non-Hispanic (11.4) and Hispanic (10.6) adolescents. Between 1999 and 2014, the total MVR death rate for adolescents ages 15–19 declined from 26 deaths per 100,000 population to 12 deaths per 100,000 population. Throughout 1999 to 2014, White, non- Hispanic adolescents had a higher MVR death rate than Black, non-Hispanic and Hispanic adolescents. This disparity in death rates declined from an 11 point difference in 1999 to about a 2 point difference in 2014. The 21st amendment (1933) requires better repeal to stop perpetuating the construction of the 18th amendment (1919), such as notation in brackets so that [both amendments] are completely repealed. Pediatrics brings the 21 year age for alcohol and marijuana purchases into question because the driving age is 16 and so many teenagers die in automobile accidents and children cannot afford to either be deprived of anymore of their rights or die a wrongful death. Although marijuana is safer than alcohol, it causes diverticulitis when eaten, and young children have needed to be hospitalized. Cigarettes are so addictive that only young teenagers are foolish enough to start using them. Teenagers should probably be learning to drink alcohol and smoke marijuana responsibly at 16, before purchasing cigarettes and pornography at 18 and owning an automobile or firearm at 21. Although rapid growth may stop by 16 or 17 neuron and body growth may continue until 19 year of age. Growth is thought to dangerously impair a teenagers' ability to learn to drive a car safely until age 20.

 

7. In 2015, 1.2 million people in the U.S. died prematurely or before the age of 75 from causes considered preventable. This is an increase of nearly 40,000 from the previous year. Eight-five percent of the increase in people who died prematurely in 2015 were 15 to 44 years old. Accidental drug overdose, homicides and motor vehicle crashes appear to be huge factors in these deaths. The report found that 6,787 people ages 15 to 24 died from motor vehicle accidents, 4,140 were firearm homicide victims and 3,727 died from drug overdoses. Accidental drug overdoses are increasing at a much more significant rate than other causes of premature death. Opioid overdoses in particular have increased in recent years. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that 33,000 people died because of opioid overdose in 2015 and that 91 people in the U.S. die every day from such drugs. The numbers are startling -- in 2015, 52,404 people died from drug overdoses according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sixty-three percent of those deaths involved an opioid. Furthermore, since 1999, the number of overdoses from prescription opioids like oxycodone and hydrocodone, as well as illicit drugs like heroin, have quadrupled. In fact, heroin now accounts for one in four overdose deaths in the United States. Since 2001, the number of people who have used heroin has increased almost five-fold, and the number of people who abuse heroin has approximately tripled. The greatest increases in use occurred among white males. While heroin use between whites and non-whites was fairly similar in the 2001-2002 results, at 0.34% and 0.32% respectively, by 2012-2013 the percentage of whites who had used heroin jumped to 1.90%. Just 1.05% of non-whites in 2012-2013 used heroin. Heroin use also increased significantly among those with a high school education or less, as well as those who lived at less than 100% of the federal poverty line. Methadone and buprenorphine have proven effectiveness data, they not only reduce the chances of dying from an opioid overdose by 50%. Approximately one-third of all white heroin users reported using prescription drugs for non-medical purposes in 2001-2002. By 2013 more than half of all white heroin users started by initially using prescription drugs. For non-whites, the number of people who started by using prescription drugs before heroin actually dropped in the same time frame. Only one in 10 of those with a substance use disorder receive any treatment.

 

8. Rescue breathing needs to be re-integrated into the training for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification for the treatment of respiratory depression caused by opiate overdose until emergency responders arrive to inject the patient with Narcan (Naloxone). The American Heart Association calls for uninterrupted chest compressions of 100 to 120 a minute until paramedics arrive. The Harm Reduction Coalition states: For a person whose breathing is severely impaired, rescue breathing or chest compressions is one of the most important steps in preventing an overdose death. When someone has extremely shallow and intermittent breathing (around one breath every 5-10 seconds) or has stopped breathing and is unresponsive, rescue breathing should be done as soon as possible because it is the quickest way to get oxygen into someone who has stopped breathing. Place the person on their back. Tilt their chin up to open the airway. Check to see if there is anything in their mouth blocking their airway, such as gum, toothpick, undissolved pills, syringe cap, cheeked Fentanyl patch (these things have ALL been found in the mouths of overdosing people!). If so, remove it. Plug their nose with one hand, and give 2 even, regular-sized breaths. Blow enough air into their lungs to make their chest rise. If you don’t see their chest rise out of the corner of your eye, tilt the head back more and make sure you’re plugging their nose. Breathe again. Give one breath every 5 seconds. The Red Cross CPR steps: 1. Push hard, push fast. Place your hands, one on top of the other, in the middle of the chest. Use your body weight to help you administer compressions that are at least 2 inches deep and delivered at a rate of at least 100 compressions per minute. 2. Deliver rescue breaths. With the person's head tilted back slightly and the chin lifted, pinch the nose shut and place your mouth over the person's mouth to make a complete seal. Blow into the person's mouth to make the chest rise. Deliver two rescue breaths, then continue compressions. 3. Continue CPR steps. Keep performing cycles of chest compressions and breathing until the person exhibits signs of life, such as breathing, an AED becomes available, or EMS or a trained medical responder arrives on scene. CPR with Chest Compression Alone or with Rescue Breathing performs either chest compressions alone, providing 50 consecutive compressions (one cycle), or chest compressions plus rescue breathing, with 2 initial rescue breaths followed by 15 chest compressions and subsequent cycles continuing the pattern in a ratio of 2 to 15. If correctly applied according to the cause of arrest, CPR would theoretically result in 156 survivors with a favorable neurologic outcome per 1000 patients, as compared with 144 per 1000 if chest compression alone were used for all patients or 115 per 1000 if chest compression plus rescue breathing were used for all patients.

 

9. The United States Coast Guard Climate Control Program is divided into two regions – the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Hurricane Defense and the West and Gulf Coast Rainmaking Technology Fund. Chico Sky Watch A Geo-Engineering & Aerosol Spraying Awareness and Action Group lists a number of weather modification patents since US Patent No. 3,429,507 Rainmaker was filed on July 26, 1966. Other weather modification patents must be scrutinized for benevolence. Method and System For Hurricane Control Patent Publication No. 2002 0008155 January 24, 2002. Oceanic Layers Modification Methods, Apparatus, Systems and Applications US Patent No. 20080175728 A1 on July 24, 2008. Furthermore, in 2012 A.S. Trust & Holdings was awarded a U.S. patent for the formula of a blend of pure hydrocarbons that has been designated R441A by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). R441A has been certified by independent testing laboratory Intertek as having a very low Global Warming Potential (GWP) as well as a zero Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP). To use the latest in hydrocarbon fueled oceanic heating and cooling pumps to protect the Coastal states against harmful weather conditions such as drought, forest fire and hurricane the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) must not only monitor the artificial changes to sea surface temperatures caused mostly by subversive arrays of hydrocarbon heating and cooling pumps but regulate the deployment of oceanic heating and cooling pumps. Legitimate use of Rainmaking Technology would be limited to making clouds with a mobile array of maybe 100 hydrocarbon heating and cooling pumps in the coastal waters, to be seeded to extinguishing wildfires. To make clouds a line of submersible oceanic heating and cooling pumps, would be supplemented by contrail producing jet planes flying parallel to the Coast and another line of heating pumps would be placed out to sea to blow the clouds in the direction of the forest fire to be extinguished. The Atlantic and Gulf Coasts and the Caribbean islands requires a much larger array of cooling pumps to be deployed so that they can be remotely turned on to reduce sea surface temperature below 80 degrees Fahrenheit, to dissipate hurricanes. The NOAA SST Anomaly Chart for March 30, 2017 reveals that the cooling from the breaking off of a large piece of Antarctic ice is dissipating in the Northern Pacific and Atlantic. The artificial warming in the Pacific has gone south to Hawaii and Columbia in the Pacific so the Santa Anna winds are often replaced by a strange southerly. The Atlantic exhibits heating from the Coast Guard's new harbor at St. Elizabeth's Hospital on the Potomac dangerously blowing wind toward Canada and the hurricane prone Caribbean, causing unseasonably warm temperature in the Midwest and drought and forest fires in the Great Plains and record heat on the Gulf Coast.

 

10. Several state studies have shown that earning a post-conviction Bachelor's degree is a 100 percent effective cure for recidivism. Otherwise 25 percent of people with Associate's degrees and 66 percent of everyone on parole are re-incarcerated within three years of being released from prison. There is in an ED Office of Correctional Education 20USC§3423a. Changes in criminal justice policy, including more punitive sentences for drug crime, rapidly increased the size of the prison population through the 1980’s, particularly for young low-skill male minorities. There were approximately 500,000 people in jails or prisons in 1980 compared to 2.3 million in 2008. The state and federal prison population alone doubled between 1990 and 2000, primarily due to changes in sentencing guidelines. The rise in incarceration rates varied across race and ethnicity. From 1988 to 1994, the number of young black prisoners aged 18 to 25 increased 355 percent, the number of young Hispanics increased 82 percent and the number of young whites increased 67 percent. Over 90 percent of the prison population is men, almost half are black, and the data available to us at this point indicate that 40 percent have not completed high school.  A number laws resulted in a massive reduction in the number of people in public psychiatric hospitals. Labeled “deinstitutionalization” this movement sought both to reduce the hospital census and to provide treatment to people with mental illness in the community. From its high point of approximately 550,000 patients in public psychiatric hospitals in the mid 1950s the census reached 54,826 by the end of 2000. Over the course of 2002 211,199 spent some time institutionalized in a psychiatric hospital.  The rate of psychiatric hospitalization per 100,000 residents went down from 264 in 1950 to 73 in the high 2002 estimate.  Continuing the findings of most major reports on Mental Health in 2000 the National Council on Disability, an independent federal agency charged with making recommendations to the President and Congress, heard strong anti-psychiatry testimony from survivors "describing how people with psychiatric disabilities have been beaten, shocked, isolated, incarcerated, restricted, raped, deprived of food and bathroom privileges, chemically, physically and psychologically abused in institutions." The council concluded that "People with psychiatric disabilities are routinely deprived of their rights in a way no other disability group has been and the manner in which American society treats people with psychiatric disabilities constitutes a national emergency and a national disgrace". people with serious mental illness are dying at age 51, on average, compared with 76 for Americans overall. Their odds of dying from the following causes, compared with the general population. 3.4 times more likely to die of heart disease. 3.4 times more likely to die of diabetes. 3.8 times more likely to die of accidents. 5 times more likely to die of respiratory ailments. 6.6 times more likely to die of pneumonia or influenza. Adults with serious mental illness treated in public systems die about 25 years earlier than Americans overall, a gap that's widened since the early '90s when major mental disorders cut life spans by 10 to 15 years.  The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has undertaken a new critical study of psychiatric drugs. The hypothesis is that prescription psychiatric drugs are all harmful and should not be prescribed for any reason. Antipsychotic and sleep aid drugs are the leading cause of lethal drug overdose reported to the National Poison Control Center. To cure the dangerous autistic neuromuscular extra pyramidal and Tourette’s side-effects of antipsychotic and childhood stimulant medication with FDA approved antiviral flu drug Amantadine (Symmetrel).

 

Sanders, Tony J.  Chapter 4: State Mental Institution Library Education (SMILE). 10th Ed. Hospitals & Asylums. HA-11-4-17. 302 pgs. PDF ; Word