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To amend Chapter 4 Saint Elizabeth’s Hospital §161-230 by transferring §321-329 from Chapter 9 Hospitalization of the Mentally Ill National Returned from Foreign Countries to Article 11 §200-208 of this Chapter, to respect US Customs as the occupants of St. Elizabeth’s Hospital. To abolish psychiatry, civil commitment, psychiatric drugs, and all psychiatric hospitals, other than forensic or veteran’s, and prescribe Amantadine (Symmetrel) for flu and psychiatric drug tics. 25% of the world population, about 1.3 billion students were enrolled in school, in 2004. There are more than 70 million students in the US. About 98,000 elementary and secondary schools have 50 million students in attendance and 3.3 million teachers starting at $30k and earning more than $44k on average. A steadily increasing percentage of children, 3.4%, 1.7 million children were homeschooled in 2012. About 20 million students attend nearly 7,400 institutions of higher education who employed 3.9 million employees, including more than 1.1 million college professors with median earnings around $89k per year. In total, $209 billion in federal aid were made available to education in fiscal year 2017. Adding discretionary and mandatory spending total ED on-budget spending to $88.3 billion in 2015, $78.5 billion in 2016 and $79.5 billion in 2017. ED on-budget spending should grow around 2.5% annually to $82 billion in 2018 and continue to grow to $84 billion in 2019 and $86 billion in 2020. Public school teachers should be enabled to contribute, on an individual and voluntary basis, the 2.4% menopause as disability (mad) tax rate, and legislate 14 weeks of Unemployment Compensation (UC) maternity leave. Despite $11,100 per pupil education spending in excess of $718 billion child poverty is higher in the United States than any other country, gradual growth is lagging in international rank. In 2016 24% of children under the age of 18, around 14 million, were growing up in poverty, the highest rate in any industrialized nation. Of 18-to-64-year olds 20.5 million, 11.1% were poor and of people 65 and older 3.6 million, 10.1% were poor in 2011 The overall poverty rate is said to be more than 15.4%. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) beneficiaries declined from 14.2 million in 1993 to less than 5 million families today. The Education Goals of 2020 enables the WILL (Without Income Limit Law) beginning in 2017: To reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty in schools by 2020 while paying a $100 billion annual maximum allowable deficit (mad), the true federal budget deficit, without new revenues, is about -$71 billion in 2017 before it disappears. If the Social Security Amendments of January 1, 2016 balances the true federal budget - annual agency spending growth will be limited to 3 percent, a 3 percent annual Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) shall be legislated for all social security beneficiaries and minimum wage workers - the nation could afford to end poverty by 2020. School districts shall balance their budget, provide poor and nearly poor families of an estimated 24 million children with food banks, showers, free clothing, laundry and necessities operated by student volunteers. The US shall expand SSI from 1.8 million juveniles and 6.5 million adults in 2015 to pay the families of 14 million children and 30 million adults living below the poverty line in the United States by 2020. Welfare benefits shall not be reduced until >150% of the poverty line.

 

Be the Democratic and Republican (DR) two party system Abolished

 

1st Draft Aug. 2004, 2nd May 2005 3rd 28 Feb. 2007, 4th 31 July 2007, 5th 20 April 2009, 6th 16 March 2011, 7th 7 March 2013, 8th 7 April 2015, 9th 27 March 2016

 

1. The Education Goals of 2020 enable the WILL (Without Income Limit Law) beginning in 2017: To reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty in schools by 2020. If the United States, passes the Social Security Amendments of January 1, 2016, balances the true federal budget - limits annual agency growth to 3 percent, legislates a 3 percent annual Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) for all social security beneficiaries and minimum wage workers and dedicates the growing surplus to the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program - the nation could afford to end poverty by 2020. To encourage school districts to balance their budget, provide poor and nearly poor families of an estimated 24 million children with food banks, showers, free clothing, laundry and necessities operated by student volunteers under 24USC(10) §422(d-1). To expand Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for the Aged, Blind and Disabled under Sec. 1635 of Title XVI of the Social Security Act as codified at 42USC§1383d that currently pays 1.8 million juveniles under Sullivan v. Zebley, 493U.S.521(1990) to pay the families of an estimated 14 million children growing up below the poverty line in the United States. To enable public school teachers, and other state employees, insured for Old Age under Title I the Social Security Act, to contribute, on an individual and voluntary basis, to pay either the current 1.8% or actual 2.4% DI menopause as disability (mad) tax rate, under Sec. 201(b)(1)(S) of Title II of the Social Security Act 42USC(7)II§401 and legislate 3 months of Unemployment Compensation (UC) amending expired Section 305 of Title III of the Social Security Act 42USC§505 for 'Maternity Leave' to fulfill the ILO convention No. 183 (2000) and Holidays with Pay Convention No. 132 (1970. To stabilize federal education department spending at 2.5-3% annual growth from +/-$80 billion FY 2017 and account for the historical tables of White House Office of Management and Budget (WHOMB). To legislate a 3% annual COLA at Sec. 225(i) 42USC425(i) retroactive to January 1, 2016 under Sec. 204(c) 42USC§404(c) and a minimum wage of 'not less than 3% annual growth, rounded to the nearest nickel, from $7.50 an hour in 2016, to $7.75 in 2017, to $8.00 an hour in 2018 etc. under 29USC§206(a)(1). To draft a UNESCO North American Convention on the Recognition of Studies, Certificates, Diplomas and Degrees and other Academic Qualifications in Higher Education, to raise the bar on the US Foreign Service Exam to a Bachelor's degree in international relations, global affairs, geography, economics and foreign language(s), to lower US bar exams and public defender pay, on a brief-by-brief basis, to the Bachelor of law degree and raise the bar for judges to juris doctor, to grant Bachelor of medicine degrees to regulate the online without prescription generic pharmaceutical industry discounted by rxmedsdoctor.net, to try one dose of Amantadine (Symmetrel) for school flu and psychiatric drug tics, to abolish psychiatry, to patiently help improve the writing ability of the extremely rich academic scientists, with deteriorating literacy from freshman to senior year of undergraduate, who become MDs to express Book 8 Drug Regulation (DR) and full-length text-book Medicine HA-5-12-13.  To repeal the word 'enforcement' in federal education statute, offending the Slavery Convention of 1926 in at least two places yesterday (a) 'enforcement of Section 111' at 20USC§112 needs to be repealed under the 21st Amendment (1933) and, (b) the words 'enforcement of' must be repealed from the caption of Part 1200 so that it simply states, Nondiscrimination on the basis of Handicap in programs or activities conducted by the National Council on Disability to comply with the end of Education at 34CFR§1200.170, and (c) General Definitions of the Office of Museum and Library Services at 20USC§9101(1) replaced with (1) No stalking in the library 18USC§2261A(2).

 

OASDI WILL Federal Share Assessment 2016-2020

(in billions of dollars)

 

Year

OASDI Payroll Tax Estimate

Without Income Limit Law

Total New Rev.

SSI and Ad. costs

Net New Rev.

WILL 90% Fed. Share 2017

True Federal On-Budget+/-

WILL Federal Budget Surplus

OMB Deficit

2016

853.0

888.4

35.4

2.2

33.2

22.4

-233

-211

-531

2017

904.9

1,213

307.7

97.7

210

189

-71

139

-458

2018

960.0

1,286

326.4

139.6

187

168

33

201

-413

2019

1,013

1,357

344.4

180.4

164

148

137

185

-503

2020

1,066

1,428

362.3

218.2

144

130

268

398

-550

Source: SSA ’14 Table IV.A3 Pg. 46 Intermediate Projection

 

2. Discrimination is defined as a universal wrong whereby a person is denied equal rights. Inequalities and discrimination may assume various forms, including explicit legal inequalities in status and entitlements, deeply rooted social distinctions and exclusions, and forms of indirect discrimination. The twin principles of equality and non-discrimination require States to take special measures to prohibit discrimination against the poor and disabled and to provide them with equal and effective protection against discrimination. The right to equality and the principle of non-discrimination are among the most fundamental elements of international human rights law. It is the right of people to live in freedom and dignity, free from poverty and despair. Poverty is a cause and a product of human rights violations. People whose rights are denied -- victims of discrimination or persecution, for example -- are more likely to be poor. Deprivation of relief benefits is an easily proved federal civil rights crime for which a fine and up to 12 months in prison, the lightest federal sentence, may be imposed under 18USC§246.  The Disability Trust Fund was established on August 1, 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower and the age requirements abolished in the 1960 Amendments. The 1972 Amendments created Title XVI Supplemental Security Income for the Aged, Blind and Disabled, the program went into effect January 1, 1974 under Sec. 1611 of Title XVI 42USC(7)XVI-A§1382. The Disability Benefits Reform Act of 1984 established the contemporary concept of disability determination that made it easier to claim mental disability. Mental illness is the second leading cause of disability, after stroke paralysis, costing disability insurance more than $24 billion and medical insurance $65 billion in 2007. Sullivan v. Zebley (1990) opened the SSI program to children and by 2015 there were 1.8 million juvenile beneficiaries. The Centers for Medicare, Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance (CMS) administrates Title XVIII Hospital Insurance for the Aged and Disabled 42USC(7)1395d provides Part A Medicare Hospital Insurance for aged and disabled social security beneficiaries and optionally sells part B and D policies for a premium. SSI beneficiaries are automatically eligible for state Medicaid programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act 42 U.S.C. 1396u.  At the end of calendar year 2013, the OASDI program was providing monthly benefits to about 58.0 million people. The OASI Trust Fund was providing benefits to about 47.0 million people and the DI Trust Fund was providing benefits to about 11.0 million people. In 2014 DI Trust Fund had $111.2 billion in total receipts, $105.4 billion net payroll tax contributions, of the $143.4 billion of total disbursements, $140.1 billion was net benefit payments. In January 2015, 8.3 million individuals received federally administered monthly $730 SSI benefits averaging $541 at a total cost of $55.5 billion. Of these, 8.2 million received monthly Federal SSI payments averaging $526, and 1.5 million received monthly State supplementation payments averaging $142. There is furthermore considerable overlap between SSDI and partial SSI payments that makes it difficult to say exactly how many beneficiaries receive money from the OASDI and SSI programs by the Social Security Administration (SSA). It can be estimated that there are a total of between 14 and 18 million individual disability beneficiaries in the United States at a total cost of $195.6 billion. Sec. 201 of Title II of the Social Security Act 42USC(7)II§401 sets forth what is currently a 1.8% taxation of total wages although actual spending has been between 2.3% and 2.4% since 2009 and the Trust fund will become depleted sometime in 2016-17 without new taxation until an increase in the DI tax rate to 2.4% is retroactively accounted for from January 1, 2016 to serve as a baseline and test of mathematical competency for the Old, Age, Survivor, Disability Insurance (OASDI) Without Income Limit Law (WILL) to balance the federal budget and eliminate poverty by 2020.

 

High Projection of SSI with a WILL to Balance the True Federal Budget 2015-20

 

Year

Monthly Benefit

(in dollars)

Average Benefit

Beneficiaries

(in millions)

Annual Benefits

(in billions)

Annual Admin.

(in billions)

Annual SSI Costs

(in billions)

2015

$733

$541

8.3

$53.9

$4.4

58.3

2016

733

541

8.3

54.7

4.5

59.2

2016 Free

755

557

8.3

55.5

4.6

60.1

2016 DI WILL Low

755

557

8.5

56.8

4.6

61.4

2017 Free

777

574

8.4

56.3

4.7

61.0

2017 WILL Intermediate

777

574

19.9

137.3

4.7

142

2017 WILL Low

777

574

13.5

93.0

4.7

97.7

2017 WILL High

777

777

24.9

232

4.7

237

2018 Free

800

591

8.5

60.3

4.9

65.2

2018 WILL Intermediate

800

591

22.4

159.1

4.9

164

2018 WILL Low

800

591

19

134.7

4.9

139.6

2018 WILL High

800

800

37.0

355.1

4.9

360

2019 Free

825

609

8.7

63.6

5.0

68.6

2019 WILL Intermediate

825

609

24.7

181

5.0

186

2019 WILL Low

825

609

24

175.4

5.0

180.4

2019 WILL High

825

825

48.1

476

5.0

481

2020 Free

850

627

8.8

66.2

5.2

71.4

2020 WILL Intermediate

850

627

29.9

225

5.2

230

2020 WILL Low

850

627

29

218.2

5.2

223.4

2020 WILL High

850

850

61.3

625

5.2

630

Source: 2015 Annual Report of the Social Security Program

 

3. Today there 8.3 million SSI benefits and 11 million disability benefits with considerable overlap for a total of between 11 and 19 million individual beneficiaries for accounting in the first Summer Solstice issue.  Around 9 million people received DI benefits that averaged $832.80 a month in 2007. Average inflation-adjusted annual personal income for DI beneficiaries remained roughly constant at $12,855 in 1984 and $12,805 in 1999. Approximately 10.1% of DI beneficiaries worked in 1984, compared with 22.0% in 1999. For DI beneficiaries, the percentage with income below 50% of the poverty threshold jumped from 2.6% in 1984 to 6.0% in 1999. Although the mentally ill were said to have received over $900 a month in disability benefits on average in 2007 a growing of number are going with the mentally retarded and developmentally disabled who collected $640 monthly in 2007 and continue to earn $600-699 a month far long after the 42 month limit in (Revelation 13:10) after which time they are entitled to an automatic raise to $700 a month, rather than inciting economic recession by wrongfully punishing the faultless beneficiaries with three years without Cost-of-living adjustment (COLA). Wrongful overpayment decisions willfully afflicting beneficiaries with $600-$699 a month shall be redressed, without any need to file a claim, by the reinstatement of the original benefit amount and backpay from the Defense of Social Security Caucus of 2011 underpayment Sec. 204(c) of the Social Security Act 42USC§404(c). In the future, social security beneficiaries shall be protected from arbitrary overpayment decisions, taxation, garnishment or government interference of any kind, until their family unit has achieved an income that is 150% of the poverty line for nine months and expected to continue. Historically, society has tended to isolate and segregate individuals with disabilities, and, despite some improvements, such forms of discrimination against individuals with disabilities continues to be a serious and pervasive social problem. Until recently the disabled have had no legal recourse with which to redress such discrimination. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. L. 88-352) as amended by the Civil Rights Act of 1991 (Pub. L. 102-166) all personnel actions affecting employees or applicants for employment with the federal government including those paid from non-appropriated funds shall be made free from any discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has the authority to enforce appropriate remedies, including reinstatement or hiring of employees with or without back pay and shall, target individuals who historically have been victims of employment discrimination and have not been equitably served. Due to the absence of any empirical racial statistics of the beneficiary population, and corroborated observation by an African-American Deputy Commissioner, who disclosed that African Americans have better luck with Survivor Insurance from the Old Age Survivor Insurance (OASI) Trust Fund than DI or SSI, it is hypothesized that there is a pattern of exclusion of black people from the Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs. A racial survey is needed under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Because African-Americans are so poor in psychiatric institutionalization, with average family savings of less than $1,000 not including less than $5,000 home equity, it seems necessary to admit 'extremely poor African-American' as a qualifying diagnosis for disability, prioritizing families with children for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and disabled workers who have contributed for more than 10 quarters with Disability Insurance (DI) at slightly greater than the 13.2% of the US population who are African-American plus the 2.5% of two or more races, 15.7% - at least 20% of new disability benefits should be given to African-Americans.

 

4. Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Pub. L. 93-112) prohibits federal contractors and subcontractors from discriminating against and requires affirmative action for qualified individuals with disabilities in all aspects of employment. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance and in federally conducted programs. Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 (S.939) 42USC(126)§12101 opened the door to a new age for people with disabilities by establishing a comprehensive prohibition of discrimination on the basis of disability. The plan is to reduce barriers to people with disabilities, ensure that all Americans have the opportunity to learn and to develop skills, to engage in productive work, to choose where to live, and to participate in community life. The ADA has helped the federal government to better protect the civil rights of the 43 million Americans suffering from physical and mental disability. Society has historically tended to isolate and segregate individuals with disabilities, and, despite some improvements, such forms of discrimination against individuals with disabilities continue to be a serious and pervasive social problem; discrimination against individuals with disabilities persists in such critical areas as employment, housing, public accommodations, education, transportation, communication, recreation, institutionalization, health services, voting, and access to public services.  The World Programme of Action Concerning Disabled Persons United Nations Decade of Disabled Persons 1983-1992. Among the major outcomes of the Decade of Disabled Persons was the adoption, by the General Assembly, of the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities in 1993. Although not a legally binding instrument, the Standard Rules represent a strong moral and political commitment of Governments to take action to attain equalization of opportunities for persons with disabilities.  Although not a legally binding instrument, the Standard Rules represent a strong moral and political commitment of Governments to take action to attain equalization of opportunities for persons with disabilities. Rule 8. Income maintenance and social security provides, States are responsible for the provision of social security and income maintenance for persons with disabilities. States should ensure the provision of adequate income support to persons with disabilities who, owing to disability or disability-related factors, have temporarily lost or received a reduction in their income or have been denied employment opportunities. States should ensure that the provision of support takes into account the costs frequently incurred by persons with disabilities and their families as a result of the disability. In countries where social security, social insurance or other social welfare schemes exist or are being developed for the general population, States should ensure that such systems do not exclude or discriminate against persons with disabilities. States should also ensure the provision of income support and social security protection to individuals who undertake the care of a person with a disability. Income support should be maintained as long as the disabling conditions remain in a manner that does not discourage persons with disabilities from seeking employment. It should only be reduced or terminated when persons with disabilities achieve adequate and secure income.  States, in countries where social security is to a large extent provided by the private sector, should encourage local communities, welfare organizations and families to develop self-help measures and incentives for employment or employment-related activities for persons with disabilities. In practice the term “incentive” means that the disabled must be protected against premature deprivation or taxation of their benefits before the beneficiary earns a substantial gainful income of more than 150% of the poverty line, for more than nine months, and is expected to continue to do so. To sweeten the deal it has been proposed in the Free DIRT (Disability Insurance Reallocation Tax) Act of January 1, 2016 that the United States legislate a voluntary 1% UN contribution from payroll and corporate income that even low income social security beneficiaries could voluntarily contribute 1% of their income to a world wide social security style welfare program on their 1040 that could ultimately afford to pay benefits to all the poorest people in the world, prioritizing the aged and disabled, and otherwise uninsured victims of catastrophic disaster, who would be unlikely to maintain an adequate standard of living without cash assistance from social security. 

 

100% of the Federal Poverty Level Guidelines 2016

 

Family Size

Annual

Monthly

Weekly

1

$11,880

$990

$228

2

$16,020

$1,335

$308

3

$20,160

$1,680

$388

4

$24,300

$2,025

$467

5

$28,440

$2,370

$547

6

$32,580

$2,715

$627

7

$36,730

$3,061

$706

8

$40,890

$3,408

$786

Each Add'l

$4,160

$347

$80

Source: Mass Legal Services, HHS 2016

 

5. In 2006 there were 4,265,996 births out of nearly 6.6 million pregnancies, a 3 percent increase from the year before, the largest single-year increase since 1989 and the highest total number of births since 1961, near the end of the baby boom. For the first time in 35 years, the U.S. fertility rate has climbed high enough to sustain a stable population, solidifying the nation's unique status among industrialized countries as a growth state, with about 1% annual growth. The 2014 preliminary number of U.S. births was 3,985,924. The general fertility rate was 62.9 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44, up 1% from 2013, and the first increase in the fertility rate since 2007. Rates rose for non-Hispanic white and Asian or Pacific Islander women, but historic lows were observed for Hispanic women and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Teen childbearing in the United States in 2014 fell to another historic low of 24.2 per 1,000 females. Record lows were seen for each race and Hispanic origin group. The cesarean delivery rate declined to 32.2% of births in 2014, down 2% from the 2009 peak of 32.9%. Declines in rates were seen for most race and Hispanic origin groups for 2013–2014. The preterm birth rate fell slightly in 2014 to 9.57% of births, down 8% from the 2007 high. Preterm rates declined among most race and Hispanic origin groups during 2007–2014.  Poverty is particularly high amongst families with children, running around 22 percent of childbirths. Estimating +/-4 million total births a year that would mean that about 1 million SSI benefits would issued and 3 million wealthy workers, with more than $2,000 in assets, would either be entitled to 14 weeks of unpaid leave or 14 weeks of paid leave because they contributed to their state unemployment compensation (UC) fund who agrees to pay for 14 weeks of maternity leave. A million semi-permanent SSI benefits would cost about $8.7 billion, 16% of 2015 expenditures, but with the WILL the SSI program is expected to expand dramatically, these million children born to poor families annually are the primary target for SSI benefits and would be only one third of the new costs predicted. 3 million UC benefits of about $400 a week for 14 weeks would cost an estimated $16.8 billion. The logical first place for state unemployment compensation programs to get this money would be through improved sales of UC to women who want to insure themselves for maternity leave. Secondly, the WILL subsidizes any deficits incurred by the maternity leave program on state unemployment compensation programs. Maternity Leave Section 305 of the Social Security Act 42USC§505 (a) To expedite the reemployment of individuals who have established a benefit year to claim unemployment compensation under the State law the Secretary of Labor shall fulfill the 14 months of paid leave authorized for Maternity Leave by ILO Convention 183 (2000). Employers shall provide at least 3 weeks of paid leave annually to uphold the Holiday with Pay Convention No. 132 (1970). On production of a medical certificate, stating the presumed date of childbirth, a woman shall be entitled to a period of maternity leave of not less than 14 weeks. Cash benefits shall be provided at a level which ensures that the woman can maintain herself and her child in proper conditions of health and with a suitable standard of living.  Where a woman does not meet the conditions to qualify for cash benefits under national laws and regulations or in any other manner consistent with national practice, she shall be entitled to adequate benefits out of social assistance funds, subject to the means test required for eligibility for such assistance, from the Supplemental Security Income Program for the Aged, Blind and Disabled under Sec. 1611 of Title XVI of the Social Security Act 42USC§1382.  Medical benefits shall be provided for the woman and her child. Medical benefits shall include prenatal, childbirth and postnatal care, as well as hospitalization care when necessary.

 

6. When special education was first identified as a national priority an estimated 2% of students in public schools would be classified as learning disabled. Today, well in excess of 5% of students in public schools are in special education classes, and that number seems to increase each year. In 1999-2000, as many as 13 percent of public school children were enrolled in special Education, of which nearly half were considered learning-disabled. Over the past decade, the number of students with disabilities served in regular classrooms has increased. According to a 2003 national survey, prevalence varies widely throughout the states, ranging from a low of 2.96% in Kentucky to a high of 9.46% in Rhode Island. Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Public Law 93-112) was the first legislation it the United States designed to create civil rights for citizens with disabilities, states: No qualified handicapped person shall, on the basis of handicap, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity which receives or benefits from Federal Financial assistance under 29USCV§794(a). Disabilities are defined as impairments that significantly limit one or more major life activities, including walking, seeing, hearing, and learning. In 1990 the Americans with Disabilities Act used the same criteria to describe a disability but applied to both the public and private sectors. The 5,669,057 students ages 6 to 21 who received special education services under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part B, in the fall of 2013 were in the following diagnostic categories: 2,188,413 (or 38.6 percent) in specific learning disability, 1,080,790 (or 19.1 percent) in speech or language impairment, 411,048 (or 7.3 percent) in intellectual disabilities 350,870 (or 6.2 percent) in emotional disturbance, 140,209 (or 2.5 percent) in multiple disabilities, 65,502 (or 1.2 percent) in hearing impairments, 49,909 (or 0.9 percent) in orthopedic impairments, 958,751 (or 16.9 percent) in other health impairments, 24,988 (or 0.4 percent) in visual impairments, 476,058 (or 8.4 percent) in autism, 1,269 (or 0.02 percent) in deaf-blindness, 25,266 (or 0.4 percent) in traumatic brain injury, and 133,698 (or 2.4 percent) in developmental delay. Of the 376,452 students ages 14 to 21 who exited special education services in 2011-2012, 247,596 graduated with a diploma, 53,564 received a certificate, 77,797 dropped out, and 7,058 died/aged out of service.  The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, Public Law No. 101-476) ensures the rights of students with disabilities to a free public education that meets their unique needs. The 1997 amendments to the IDEA require the federal government (1) to provide assistance to states in developing early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families. This assures a free appropriate public education to all children and youth with disabilities. (2) To assure that the rights of children and youth with disabilities form birth to age 21, as well as their families, are protected. (3) To help states and localities provide for early intervention services and the education of all children with disabilities. (4) To assess and assure the effectiveness of efforts to provide early intervention services and educate children with disabilities. The basic IDEA is that an individual education plan (IEP) is created for each special education student. An IEP creates paperwork, that should be used with increasing frequency in the future, for poor children to qualify for disability and be awarded Supplemental Security Income. Individualized education plans (IEP) are created for each special education student. Schools should submit these IEPs to the Social Security Administration (SSA) with increasing frequency in the future, to help poor children to qualify for disability so their families could be paid Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for the Aged, (Young,) Blind and Disabled (Poor) under Sec. 1635 of Title XVI of the Social Security Act as codified at 42USC§1383d.

 

Federal Education Spending 2014-2017

(in thousands of dollars)

 

Program

2015

2016

2017

2016-17

Growth

2016-17 % Growth

ESEA

37,086,454

38,190,710

38,817,005

626,296

1.6%

Post-secondary

26,532,161

26,593,507

26,800,522

207,015

0.8%

Total Discretionary Spending

67,135,576

68,306,763

69,388,269

1,081,506

1.6%

Total Mandatory Spending

20,377,890

10,171,706

10,087,260

-84,446

-0.8%

Total ED Spending

87,513,466

78,478,469

79,475,529

997,060

1.3%

OMB ED on-budget Estimate

103,288,000

68,506,000

73,669,000

5,163,000

7.5%

Source: ED FY 2017 Budget

 

7. 25% of the world population is enrolled in school. In 2004, about 1.3 billion students were enrolled in schools around the world. Of these students, 685 million were in elementary-level programs, 503 million were in secondary programs, and 132 million were in higher education programs. More than 70 million people attend school in the United States. In the United States there are about 98,000 elementary and secondary schools with nearly 50 million students in attendance. About 20 million students attend nearly 7,400 institutions of higher education who employed 3.9 million employees in fall 2011. More than 1.1 million college professors in the are paid anywhere from $50k to $158k per year, but median earnings come to around $89k per year. Public schools employ more than 3.1 million full-time teachers. The pupil per teacher ratio is 16.0. A steadily increasing percentage of children, 3.4%, 1.7 million children were homeschooled in 2012. The average teacher salary for a public school teacher in 2001 was $43.3k, starting at $30k. Although average wages may have increased, an average of $1,040 individual voluntary disability insurance (DI) contributions could be collected at the current 1.8% or 2.4% menopause as disability (mad) tax rate from as many a 3.1 million public school teachers and their employers, who might also be interested in contributing to state unemployment compensation (UC) policies that pay for 3 months of maternity leave. The goal of the Without Income Limit (WILL) is to balance the federal budget and reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty in schools by 2020. The number of children raised in poverty continues to rise. From 2006 to 2011 the percentage of children living below the official poverty line increased from 18% to 22%, and when we include the “near poor”, the percentage has changed from 40% to 45% - almost half – of all children in the United States under the age of 18 and might benefit from a school food bank and other voluntary non-profit services. The statistics are even worse for younger children: 49% of children under 3 years of age and 48% of those between 3 and 5 years of age are currently living in poor or near poor households. Only 10% of children living with both parents were below the poverty line whereas 40% living with only one parent were below the poverty line. Children living only with their mothers were twice as likely to live in poverty as those living only with their fathers. In 2016 an estimated 24% of children under the age of 18, around 14 million children, nearly 1 in 4 US children, were growing up in poverty, the highest rate in any industrialized nation. In Finland, the number is about 2.8%; Norway, 3.4%; Sweden, maybe 4.2%, Switzerland, 6.8%, Netherlands in second place at 9.8%. Of 18-to-64-year olds 20.5 million, 11.1% were poor and of people 65 and older 3.6 million, 10.1% were poor in 2011. The number of TANF beneficiaries has declined dramatically from a high of nearly 14.2 million beneficiaries in 1993 to little less than 5 million families in 2003 after the Personal Responsibility and World Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 deprived families of 10 million relief benefits under 18USC§246. From 1990 to 2000 the high school completion rate declined in all but seven states. Housing instability and homelessness among children and youth continues to rise. Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth are homeless in a given year, and over 50% were not attending school regularly. The McKinney-Vento Homeless assistance act of 1987 was amended in 2001 for Part B to provide education for homeless children and youth. At more than $11,100 per pupil education spending in the United State is higher than in any other country. The federal education department (ED) provides about 12% of nearly $1 trillion in annual education spending. Adding discretionary and mandatory spending brings total ED spending to $88.3 billion in 2015, $78.5 billion in 2016 and $79.5 billion in 2017. There is also another $50 billion or so in student loan repayments recirculated as student loans. OMB estimates education spending of $103.3 billion in 2015, $68.5 billion in 2016 and $73.7 billion in 2017. This is a difference of $15 billion in 2015, - $10 billion in 2016, and $5.8 billion in 2017, a margin of error of 17% in 2015, 12.7% in 2016 and 7.3% in 2017. Federal education spending growth needs to be stabilized at less than 3% a year, aiming for 2.5% like other agencies, and should never be negative. 1973 and 1974 seem to be the only years that positive ED spending growth was reported to be less than 3% by OMB historical tables. ED's staff of 4,169, nearly 45 percent below the 7,528 employees who administered Federal education programs in several different agencies in 1980 when the Department was founded. Real spending growth might be better than 1.3% between 2016 and 2017 to help pay the employer portion of teacher disability contributions and help schools provide poor children with free clothing and food bank with a total of $80 billion in discretionary and so-called mandatory federal spending in 2017 by which time mandatory spending fluctuations should be abolished and total ED spending should grow around 2.5% to $82 billion in 2018 and continue to grow to $84 billion in 2019 and $86 billion in 2020.

 

8. 1.77 million, 3.4% of students were homeschooled in 2012, which is an 18% increase since the last study in 2007. The age range of homeschooled students represented in the NCES study is 5-17 years old. Of these students, 51% are of the female gender, while 49% are male. Ethnicity is reported as 68% White, 15% Hispanic, 8% Black, and 4% Asian or Pacific Islander. Of the home-educated families that completed the survey, 34% were reported to live in a suburban area, 31% in a rural location, 28% in a city setting, and 7% in a town. 20% of these families are considered poor. 11% of parents instructing their children at home didn't complete high school, 20% had completed high school or received a GED, 30% had vocational, technical, or at least some college training, 25% obtained a Bachelor's degree, and 14% went on to graduate or professional school. Curriculum materials are widely available to homeschoolers. Parents can choose to use a boxed curriculum set, online materials, computer software programs, a distance learning school, books from the library, or any combination of the above.  Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states, but because the federal government has no direct authority to regulate education, each state is free to implement its own legal structure for home education.  A projected 3.5 million full-time-equivalent (FTE) elementary and secondary school teachers were engaged in classroom instruction in fall 2013. This number is about 1 percent higher than in fall 2003. The 2013 projected number of FTE teachers includes 3.1 million public school teachers and 0.4 million private school teachers. The number of pupils per FTE teacher—that is, the pupil/teacher ratio—will be 16.0. In 2011–12, some 76 percent of public school teachers were female, 44 percent were under age 40, and 56 percent had a master’s or higher degree. Compared with public school teachers, a lower percentage of private school teachers had a master’s or higher degree (43 percent). This ratio is the same as the 2000 ratio. From 1982 to 2000, the percentage of teachers who had earned a master's degree in their subject area fell from 17 percent to 5 percent. The average salary for public school teachers in 2012–13 was $56,383 in current dollars. The average teacher salary for a public school teacher in 2001 was $43,300, compared to the average full-time worker salary of $40,100. The starting salary for teachers was around $30,000. Nearly 7,400 institutions of higher education, 2,039 of which were public, 1,890 private nonprofit, and 3,469 for-profit, employed 3,920,836 employees in fall 2011 0.7% growth from the previous year, the slowest growth in decades. Close to four-fifths of Professors in the United States have been in the field for more than 10 years. Pay can fall anywhere from $50,000 to $158,000 per year, but median earnings come to around $89,000 per year. The Alliance for Excellent Education reported in 2005 that 50 percent (often higher in urban areas) of new teachers leave the field within their first five years of teaching and should be eligible Unemployment insurance (UC) benefits if they contributed. Of the 3,380,300 full-time and part-time public school teachers who were teaching during the 2007–08 school year, 84.5 percent remained at the same school (“stayers”), 7.6 percent moved to a different school (“movers”), and 8.0 percent left the profession (“leavers”) during the following year. A significant percentage of, mostly female, career public school teachers also quit after their children turn 18 and/or reach menopause. Unfortunately, the State Old Age Assistance Programs under Title I of the Social Security Act that public school teachers contribute to does not include disability insurance and after twenty years of service benefits are now known to be $200 a month. Other people who have been dependent on disability their entire adult life and public school teachers who once sued for early retirement after twenty years of service and received the ideal $1,000 a month are now struggling with $666 for more than 42 months (Revelation 13:10). Teaching primary and secondary education is said to be a great profession for academic underachievers to get decent paying work with a Bachelor's degree. The number of good classroom teachers, and therefore the quality of teaching itself, is reported to be in perilous decline and is expected to continue to worsen. Academically stronger students tend to shun the teaching profession. Undergraduate education majors typically have lower SAT and ACT scores than other students, and those teachers who have the lowest scores are the most likely to remain in the profession. The lower the quality of the undergraduate institution a person attends, the more likely he or she is to wind up in the teaching profession.

 

9. Several state studies have shown that earning a post-conviction Bachelor's degree is a 100 percent effective cure for recidivism. Otherwise 25 percent of people with Associate's degrees and 66 percent of everyone on parole are re-incarcerated within three years of being released from prison. There is in an ED Office of Correctional Education 20USC§3423a. Changes in criminal justice policy, including more punitive sentences for drug crime, rapidly increased the size of the prison population through the 1980’s, particularly for young low-skill male minorities. There were approximately 500,000 people in jails or prisons in 1980 compared to 2.3 million in 2008. The state and federal prison population alone doubled between 1990 and 2000, primarily due to changes in sentencing guidelines. The rise in incarceration rates varied across race and ethnicity. From 1988 to 1994, the number of young black prisoners aged 18 to 25 increased 355 percent, the number of young Hispanics increased 82 percent and the number of young whites increased 67 percent. Over 90 percent of the prison population is men, almost half are black, and the data available to us at this point indicate that 40 percent have not completed high school.  A number laws resulted in a massive reduction in the number of people in public psychiatric hospitals. Labeled “deinstitutionalization” this movement sought both to reduce the hospital census and to provide treatment to people with mental illness in the community. From its high point of approximately 550,000 patients in public psychiatric hospitals in the mid 1950s the census reached 54,826 by the end of 2000. Over the course of 2002 211,199 spent some time institutionalized in a psychiatric hospital.  The rate of psychiatric hospitalization per 100,000 residents went down from 264 in 1950 to 73 in the high 2002 estimate.  Continuing the findings of most major reports on Mental Health in 2000 the National Council on Disability, an independent federal agency charged with making recommendations to the President and Congress, heard strong anti-psychiatry testimony from survivors "describing how people with psychiatric disabilities have been beaten, shocked, isolated, incarcerated, restricted, raped, deprived of food and bathroom privileges, chemically, physically and psychologically abused in institutions." The council concluded that "People with psychiatric disabilities are routinely deprived of their rights in a way no other disability group has been and the manner in which American society treats people with psychiatric disabilities constitutes a national emergency and a national disgrace". people with serious mental illness are dying at age 51, on average, compared with 76 for Americans overall. Their odds of dying from the following causes, compared with the general population. 3.4 times more likely to die of heart disease. 3.4 times more likely to die of diabetes. 3.8 times more likely to die of accidents. 5 times more likely to die of respiratory ailments. 6.6 times more likely to die of pneumonia or influenza. Adults with serious mental illness treated in public systems die about 25 years earlier than Americans overall, a gap that's widened since the early '90s when major mental disorders cut life spans by 10 to 15 years.  The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has undertaken a new critical study of psychiatric drugs. The hypothesis is that prescription psychiatric drugs are all harmful and should not be prescribed for any reason. Antipsychotic and sleep aid drugs are the leading cause of lethal drug overdose reported to the National Poison Control Center. To cure the dangerous autistic neuromuscular extra pyramidal and Tourette’s side-effects of antipsychotic and childhood stimulant medication with FDA approved antiviral flu drug Amantadine (Symmetrel).

 

10. Social Security Amendments of January 1, 2016

 

Retroactively Free DIRT (Disability Insurance Reallocation Tax) and 3% COLA (Cost of Living Adjustment) Act of January 1, 2016

 

To amend the DI tax rate from 1.80% to 2.40% in 2016, 2.30% in 2017 and 2.20% in 2018; from 0.90% to 1.20% in 2016, 1.15% in 2017 and 1.10% in 2018 for employees and from 0.90% to 1.20% in 2016, 1.15% in 2017 and 1.10% in 2018 for employers under Sec. 201(b)(1)(S) of the Social Security Act 42USC(7)II§401.

 

To amend the OASI tax rate from 10.60% to 10.0% in 2016, 10.10% in 2017, and 10.20% in 2018; from 5.30% to 5.00% in 2016, to 5.05% in 2017, to 5.10% in 2018 for employees under 26USC(C)(21)(A)§3101 (a) and from 5.30% to 5.00% in 2016, 5.05% in 2017, and 5.10% in 2018 for employers under 26USC(C)(21)(A)§3111 (a) to avoid depletion of the Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund in 2016 without increasing the overall 12.4% OASDI or 15.3% OASDI and Hospital Insurance (HI) Federal Insurance Contribution Act tax-rate under 26USC(A)(2)§1401.

 

To legislate a 3% annual COLA at Sec. 225(i) 42USC425(i) retroactive to January 1, 2016 under Sec. 204(c) 42USC§404(c) and a minimum wage of 'not less than 3% annual growth, rounded to the nearest nickel, from $7.50 an hour in 2016, to $7.75 in 2017, to $8.00 an hour in 2018 etc. under 29USC§206(a)(1).

 

To legislate a new voluntary 1% United Nations social security tax on personal and corporate income, even poor social security beneficiaries could pay or cease to pay by checking a box and filing a 1040, that would pay cash benefits to the world’s poorest people.

 

To amend Annual Reports Sec. 1161 of Title 11 of the Social Security Act 42USC(7)XI-B§1320c-10 so that the Commissioner of Social Security will sign a combined Federal OASDI Trust Fund and SSI Program Report and the Administrator of CMS would sign a combined Annual Report on the Federal Medicare, Medicaid and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (Medicaid nationalization from 2015?) by June 20th for perennial Summer Solstice issue beginning in 2016.

 

Be it enacted in the House and Senate, Assembled

 

Without Income Limit Law (WILL)

 

To abolish the maximum taxable limit on DI contributions on January 1, 2016 and OASI contributions January 1, 2017 and repeal Adjustment of the contribution and benefit base Section 230 of the Social Security Act 42USC(7)§430.

 

To require the Social Security Administration to pay for SSI Costs beginning January 1, 2017.

 

To share profits in excess of social security program costs with the general fund of the U.S Treasury on a negotiable sliding scale beginning year end 2016 DI 50/50 with the USPS, and OASI in 2017 to eliminate the true federal budget deficit and maximize welfare payments. Even without any new sources of revenues the true federal budget deficit is estimated to be only -$71 billion in 2017 before disappearing and making a surplus in future years, as opposed to the permanently wrong -$453 billion deficit estimate of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Therefore there shall be a maximum allowable deficit (mad) of $100 billion. In 2020, if the United States balances the federal budget, the nation will be able afford to guarantee everyone a poverty line income, without a balanced federal budget the nation will only be able to afford to reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty in schools. OASDI will save to pay for the peak in costs of Baby Boomer generation in 2035 when the overall OASDI tax rate might be raised from 12.4%.

 

Be it enacted in the House and Senate Assembled

 

Maternity Leave Section 305 of the Social Security Act 42USC§505

 

(a) To expedite the reemployment of individuals who have established a benefit year to claim unemployment compensation under the State law the Secretary of Labor shall fulfill the 14 months of paid leave authorized for Maternity Leave by International Labour Organization (ILO) Convention No. 183 (2000).

 

(1) The Family and Medical Leave Act shall be repealed except in that workers's positions who have served their benefit year, shall continue to be entitled to up to twelve weeks of (unpaid) sick leave, 14 weeks of maternity leave and 24 weeks to care for an injured armed service-member.

 

(2) Employers shall provide at least 3 weeks of paid leave annually to uphold the Holiday with Pay ILO Convention No. 132 (1970).

 

(b) On production of a medical certificate, stating the presumed date of childbirth, a woman shall be entitled to a period of maternity leave of not less than 14 weeks. Cash benefits shall be provided at a level which ensures that the woman can maintain herself and her child in proper conditions of health and with a suitable standard of living.

 

(1) Where a woman does not meet the conditions to qualify for cash benefits under national laws and regulations or in any other manner consistent with national practice, she shall be entitled to adequate benefits out of social assistance funds, subject to the means test required for eligibility for such assistance, from the Supplemental Security Income Program for the Aged, Blind and Disabled under Sec. 1611 of Title XVI of the Social Security Act 42USC§1382.

 

(2) Medical benefits shall be provided for the woman and her child. Medical benefits shall include prenatal, childbirth and postnatal care, as well as hospitalization care when necessary.

 

Be it enacted in the House and Senate Assembled

 

Torture 18 U.S. Code § 2340A(a) amended so 'outside the United States' is removed so - Whoever commits or attempts to commit torture shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both, and if death results to any person from conduct prohibited by this subsection, shall be punished by death or imprisoned for any term of years or for life. Exclusive Remedies 18U.S.C§2340B may be replaced with ‘The State shall ensure in its legal system that the victim of an act of torture obtains redress and has an enforceable right to fair and adequate compensation, including the means for as full rehabilitation as possible. In the event of the death of the victim as a result of an act of torture, his dependents shall be entitled to compensation under Art. 14 of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment of 26 June 1987’. To repeal the word 'enforcement' in federal education statute, offending the Slavery Convention of 1926 in at least two places yesterday (a) 'enforcement of Section 111' at 20USC§112 needs to be repealed like Prohibition under the 21st Amendment (1933) and, (b) the words 'enforcement of' must be removed from the caption of Part 1200 so that it states, Nondiscrimination on the basis of Handicap in programs or activities conducted by the National Council on Disability at the end of Education statute 34CFR§1200.170, and (c) General Definitions of the Office of Museum and Library Services at 20USC§9101(1) replaced with (1) No stalking in the library 18USC§2261A(2).

 

Passing these amendments the USA should be qualified to ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006), the International Labor Organization Conventions Holiday with Pay Convention No. 132 (1970) and Maternity Leave Convention 183 (2000), will reduce poverty by half and eliminate child poverty in schools or completely end poverty by 2020. Blessed are the poor (Matthew 5:3)

 

Sanders, Tony J.  Chapter 4: State Mental Institution Library Education (SMILE). 9th Ed. Hospitals& Asylums. 27 March 2016. 240 pgs.  www.title24uscode.org/SMILE.doc

Test Questions www.title24uscode.org/smiletest.doc