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Message of the Public Trustees HA-22-9-18

 

To prevent the unnecessary OASI deficit, that is driving the Actuary to madly declare a premature combined deficit for the intermediate projections, Congress must not wait for the expiration of the 2.37% DI tax rate in 2019 from the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 to adopt a 2.1% DI tax rate beginning in 2018 for the intermediate projection under Sec. 201(b)(1)(T) of the Social Security Act under 42USC§401(b)(1)(T) FY18. By repealing ‘Adjustment of the contribution and benefit base’ tax loophole for the rich and DI tax exemption of Title I State retirement contributors and replacing it with ‘Supplemental Security Income Trust Fund’ Section 230 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§430 it is estimated that SSI benefits would increase in stages, 228% the first year of the tax, 25% the second, 5% the third, and normal 4% growth the fourth, and thereafter, unless legitimate demands to end poverty by 2030 or actuarial differences or market failure require a change in plans. It is estimated that the number of SSI beneficiaries would increase 225% from 8.1 million in 2018 to 18.5 million in 2019 to 23.1 million in 2020 with an average benefit of $589 a month, $7,069 a year, costing $163.2 billion in 2020, when the table above provides $173.9 billion, enough for 24.6 million average benefits. New monthly benefits must cost less than new monthly revenues to sustain an actual surplus. The 12.4% OASDI FICA tax adjusts 2.3% SSI 2.1% DI 8.0% OASI.  By 2020 individual income tax and customs duty revenue growth from non-discriminatory travel document sales, energy export tax, might yield on-budget surplus, especially if consumer economic growth were sustained by taxing the rich the full 12.4% OASDI tax on all their income to create an SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2020 and all poverty by 2030. Please vote to confirm this Message of the Public Trustees and sign the Annual Report with a once-in-a-lifetime promotion from $693 (2018) to $2,000 (2019) a month disability under 24CFR§1.8 and 24USC§422(d)(1).

 

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HA has been published equinox and solstice since 2001 and monthly since the website was created in December 2004.

 

Vol. 2 Is. 1, Vol. 2 Is. 4, Vol. 3 Is. 1, Vol. 3 Is. 2, Vol. 3 Is. 3, Vol. 3 Is. 4, Vol. 4 Is. 1, Vol. 4 Is. 2, Vol. 4 Is. 3, Vol. 4 Is. 4, Vol. 5 Is. 1, Vol. 5 Is. 2, Vol. 5 Is. 3, Vol. 5 Is. 4, Vol. 6 Is. 1, , Vol. 6 Is. 2, Vol. 6 Is. 3, Vol. 6 Is. 4, Vol. 7 Is. 1, Vol. 7 Is. 2, Vol. 7 Is. 3, Vol. 7 Is. 4, Vol. 8 Is 1, Vol. 8 Is. 2, Vol. 8 Is. 3, Vol. 8 Is. 4, Vol. 9 Is. 1, Vol. 9 Is. 2, Vol. 9 Is. 3, Vol. 9 Is 4, Vol. 10 Is. 1, Vol. 10 Is. 3, Vol. 10, Is. 4, Vol. 11 Is. 1, Vol. 11 No. 2, Vol. 11 No. 3, Vol. 11 No. 4, Vol 12 No. 1, Vol 12 No. 2, Vol. 12 No. 3, Vol. 12 No. 4, Vol. 13 No. 1, Vol. 13, No. 2, Vol. 13, No. 3, Vol. 13 No. 4, Vol. 14 No. 1, Vol. 14 No. 2, Vol. 14 No. 3, Vol. 14, No. 4, Vol. 15, No. 1. Vol. 15, No. 2, Vol. 15 No. 3, Vol. 15 No. 4, Vol. 16. No. 1, Vol. 16 No. 2, Vol.16 No. 3, Vol. 16 No. 4, Vol. 17 No.1, Vol. 17 No. 2, Vol. 17 No. 3, Vol. 17 No. 4, Vol. 18 No. 1, Vol. 18 No. 2, Vol. 18 No.3

 

Email:  Anthony J. Sanders at sandersasylum@gmail.com