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December 2011

 

By Anthony J. Sanders

sanderstony@live.com

 

Happy New Year!!!  My sister had a baby girl New Year’s morning around 9am.  I am going to the hospital to check on them.  The magic candle I was given at the baby shower to light when my sister went into labor seems to have worked.  I lit it at the candlelight vigil for “Gone”.  It was the only candle on the Plaza at the press prescribed time of 8pm.  But this did not make it any less spiritual.  We saw a bag filled with candles in front of the Chamber of Commerce that evening.  “Gone” is gone.  He had been wearing a Santa suit the days before Christmas.  The cause of death was ruled to be that he choked on a 4 ounce piece of steak.  Eat vegan, dance to live music and don’t forget to kiss at midnight on the New Year.   

 

TARP Winter Shelter Close-out HA-31-12-11

 

A 97 page grant proposal: To grant $1 per capita for emergency homeless shelters. To raise $50,000 in federal housing grants and tax credits for three edifices as proof of administration of $50 billion TARP distressed homeowner funds, only 5 percent administered as of September 2011, close TARP December 31, 2011, and certify the return of no less than $275 billion TARP repayments and future repayments to the “General Fund”.  To redress TARP anti-trust with a $1.4 trillion transfer of State assets from TARP multinationals to local community banks and corporations.  To pay >$50 billion annual SSI expenditure with the OASDI Trust Fund and not the General Fund from October 1, 2011.  Be the Democratic-Republican (DR) two party system dissolved, Referred to the Ashland Foundation for Creative Change, Center for Community Change and to change.org for the signing of the 17th draft Bicentennial Revolution of the Constitution of Hospitals & Asylums Non-Governmental Economy (CHANGE)

 

New Year’s Eve Candlelight Vigil at Ashland Plaza for “Gone” Shane Jolly who died there on Christmas Eve  HA-24-12-11

 

Shane Jolly, a homeless man, known as Gone by his friends, died at the Ashland Plaza at 8:30 pm on Christmas Eve.  At the Peace Church breakfast we decided to host a candlelight vigil at the Plaza on New Year's Eve.  The police man at the David Grubbs memorial on the bike path, removing the journal I had not yet inscribed a Psalm of David in, said "the medical examiner determined the cause of death to be choking on meat or his own vomit".  Autopsies are only performed in 5% of deaths in the United States. Gone had been heard a month before saying that he was "going to die" and he may have had a pre-existing medical condition for which we do demand an autopsy.  The City of Ashland must pay for the autopsy and funeral arrangements as compensation for the false arrest and spate of $1,000 tickets the days right before Gone died.  I want to know why the homeless are reputed to have shorter life expectancies than other people although the home is so much more homicidal than camping in my own experience.  We ask that the Ashland Daily Tidings make public the findings on Shane Jolly’s death certificate, request that an autopsy be performed and communicate with the family and funeral directors regarding the body and effects of the deceased. Majik WiZz says, “earlier the day Gone died at my feet he told me that he had just been given two $1,000 tickets over the past few days”. Stashe, the homeless firefighter who performed the Heimlich maneuver says, “Gone died after I had restored breathing because the ambulance put him on the stretcher on his back and he continued choking which probably caused his passing”. The last time I talked with Gone he was walking past the Food Co-op, it was snowing and he was carrying a big backpack, he was finally wearing pants and looked pretty warm with a few pairs of socks in his flip flops.  Now his soul has gone to play shofar in the House of the Lord where he is believed by Christians to be Angel. 

 

Ashland Oregon Community Shelter and Camping Declaration HA-24-12-11

 

In the entire Rogue Valley with a population of 203,206 the Medford Gospel Mission is the most reliable emergency shelter but it does not serve individuals more than 10 days a month.  In the city of Ashland with a population of 20,078 there is only a Cold Weather shelter at the First Presbyterian Church on Sundays in the winter and when it is predicted to get below 20º F.  Working under the Peace Church 501(c)(3) umbrella Aaron Fletcher has written a working title Community Shelters, that 18 people signed, and Alan Sandler has offered to pay the deposit and three months’ rent for a winter homeless shelter. The City of Ashland needs to come up with a 20 year commitment to sustain a winter homeless shelters and camping at the swimming hole in Lithia Park to help qualify the Rogue Valley for an estimated $20,000 annually in grants and tax-credits for 75% of the costs of acquiring new homeless shelters under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act.  The Ashland Daily Tidings building, across Siskiyou Blvd. from the First Presbyterian Church, is newly vacant.  Would a winter homeless shelter and an emergency declaration “summer camp by the swimming hole” not leave enough time for the grass roots to grow?  In a survey of 224 cities, the National Conference of Mayors found: (1) Only 21% prohibit begging citywide, and 43% in particular public places; (2) 16% prohibit “loitering” citywide, 39% prohibit loitering in particular public areas, and 27% prohibit sitting/lying in certain public places; (3) Only 16% had citywide prohibitions on camping, and 28% on camping in particular public places. A city that does not provide adequate shelters for the destitute cannot constitutionally enforce against them a law prohibiting sitting, lying or sleeping in public places under Jones v. City of Los Angeles, (9th Cir. 2006).  HUD reported that on any given night an estimated 754,000 persons will experience homelessness and between 330,000 and 415,000 will stay at a homeless shelter or transitional housing throughout the U.S. depending upon the season.  Over a five-year period, about 2-3 percent of the U.S. population (5-8 million people) will experience at least one night of homelessness.  A much smaller group, perhaps as many as 500,000 people, have greater difficulty ending their homelessness.  In 1996, an estimated 637,000 adults were homeless in a given week. In the same year, an estimated 2.1 million adults were homeless over the course of a year. Between 1996 and 2005 the number of emergency shelter declined from 9,600 to 6,200 a loss of 3,400 mostly due to conversion to group home.   Maybe we can Occupy as many as 10,000 new traditional and non-traditional homeless shelter grants in the USA this winter 2012.