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National Cemetery Organization (NCO)

 

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To Amend Chapter 7 National Cemeteries, repeal Chapter 7a Private and Commercial Cemeteries, free wills and trusts from obligatory registration with the Court, set forth requirements for the Probate Courts to change their name to the Justice of the Peace and improve death and estate statistics.

 

Be the Democratic and Republican (DR) honor party Dissolved, Referred to Arlington National Cemetery

 

1st Draft September 2003, 2nd 12 April 2007, 3rd 15 April 2009

 

1. This Chapter amends Chapter 7 National Cemeteries ß271-296 and repeals Chapter 7a Private and Commercial Cemeteries ß298, It can be estimated that 56,597,030 people died around the world in 2004 an average of 863 deaths per 100,000, 0.86% of the population.The preliminary number of deaths in the United States for 2004 was estimated at 2,398,343, representing a decrease of 49,945 from the 2003 total. The crude death rate was 816.7 per 100,000 population, 3.0 percent less than the rate of 841.9 per 100,000 in 2003. The preliminary infant mortality rate, those children dying in their first year, for 2004 was 6.76 infant deaths per 1,000 live births.The rate was much higher for black infants whose mortality rate was 13.65 per 1,000.More accurate, up to date, death statistics need to be compiled on the Internet at the country, state and national levels to more rapidly and accurately detect and respond to epidemics.

 

Number of deaths and Life Expectancy, by State, 2006

 

State

Deaths

Population in 1,000

Deaths Per 1,000

Life Expectancy at Birth

Life Expectancy at Birth Male

Life Expectancy at Birth Fe-male

United States

2,448,000

301, 621

8.11

77.8

75.2

80.4

Alabama

46,764

4,628

10.1

74.6

71.3

77.5

Alaska

3,486

683

5.1

76.7

74.2

79.1

Arizona

45,215

6,339

7.13

77.5

74.7

80.2

Arkansas

28,324

2,835

9.99

75.1

72.1

77.9

California

237,059††

36.553

6.49

78.3

75.9

80.6

Colorado

30,077

4,862

6.19

78.4

76.1

80.4

Connecticut

28,536

3,502

8.15

78.4

75.7

80.8

Delaware

7,332

865

8.48

76.6

74.0

78.9

District of Columbia

5,217

588

8.87

72.6

68.5

76.1

Florida

167,196

18,251

9.16

77.5

74.6

80.3

Georgia

65,913

9,545

6.91

75.3

72.3

77.8

Hawaii

9,319

1,283

7.26

79.8

77.1

82.5

Idaho

10,967

1,499

7.32

78.0

75.9

80.2

Illinois

100,049

12,853

7.78

76.7

73.9

79.2

Indiana

54,246

6,345

8.55

76.2

73.4

78.6

Iowa

27,304

2,988

9.14

78.5

75.8

80.8

Kansas

24,307

2,776

8.76

77.5

74.9

79.8

Kentucky

39,315

4,241

9.27

75.3

72.3

77.9

Louisiana

38,611

4,293

8.99

74.4

71.2

77.3

Maine

12,398

1,317

9.41

77.6

75.1

80.0

Maryland

43,715

5,618

7.78

76.3

73.6

78.8

Massachusetts

53,109

6,450

8.23

78.4

75.8

80.7

Michigan

86,740

10,072

8.61

76.5

73.9

78.7

Minnesota

37,116

5,198

7.14

79.1

76.5

81.3

Mississippi

28,236

2,919

9.67

73.7

70.4

76.7

Missouri

54,463

5,878

9.27

76.2

73.4

78.7

Montana

8,616

958

8.99

77.3

74.7

80.0

Nebraska

15,280

1,775

8.61

78.3

75.6

80.6

Nevada

19,771

2,565

7.71

75.9

73.4

78.7

New Hampshire

10,178

1,316

7.74

78.5

75.9

80.7

New Jersey

69,172

8,686

7.96

77.5

74.8

79.8

New Mexico

15,261

1,970

7.75

77.3

74.4

80.1

New York

148,378

19,298

7.69

77.9

75.1

80.2

North Carolina

76,093

9,061

8.40

75.8

72.7

78.4

North Dakota

5,648

640

8.83

78.7

75.8

81.7

Ohio

106,772

11,467

9.31

76.4

73.8

78.7

Oklahoma

36,074

3,617

9.97

75.3

72.6

77.6

Oregon

29,186

3,747

7.79

77.9

75.5

80.0

Pennsylvania

124,485

12,433

10.0

76.8

74.0

79.3

Rhode Island

9,751

1,058

9.21

78.2

75.5

80.3

South Carolina

37,763

4,408

8.57

74.9

71.6

77.9

South Dakota

6,821

796

8.57

78.0

75.0

80.9

Tennessee

56,948

6,157

9.25

75.0

71.8

77.7

Texas

158,740

23,904

6.64

76.7

74.1

79.2

Utah

14,142

2,645

5.35

78.7

76.5

80.6

Vermont

4,919

621

7.92

78.2

75.8

80.4

Virginia

57,954

7,712

7.52

76.9

74.3

79.1

Washington

47,043

6,468

7.27

78.2

75.9

80.5

West Virginia

20,912

1,812

11.54

75.0

72.3

77.7

Wisconsin

46,130

5,602

8.24

78.1

75.4

80.5

Wyoming

4,200

523

8.03

77.1

74.9

79.3

Source: National Vital Statistics Reports Births, Marriages, Divorces, and Deaths: Provisional Data for 2007. Volume 56, Number 21. US Census Interim State Population Projections 2005, Resident State Population July 2007

 

2. The preliminary estimate of life expectancy at birth for the total population in 2004 reached a record high of 77.9 years. This represents an increase of 0.4 year relative to 2003.Record-high life expectancies were reached for white males (75.7 years) and black males (69.8 years), as well as for white females (80.8 years) and black females (76.5 years). The gap between male and female life expectancy was 5.2 years in 2004, down from 5.3 years in 2003, and 5.4 years in 2002. The difference between male and female life expectancy at birth has been generally decreasing since its peak of 7.8 years in 1979.By state of residence, Hawaii had the lowest mortality in 2004 with an age-adjusted death rate of 623.6 deaths per 100,000 standard population. Mortality was highest for Mississippi, with an age-adjusted death rate of 998.2 per 100,000 standard population.

 

3. Between 1900 and 2000, life expectancy at birth in the United States increased from 47 to 77 years.Life expectancy for people aged 65 increased more than 6 years during the twentieth century, in 2002 a 65 year old American woman could expect to live almost 20 more years and a man an additional 16.6 years.In 1900, one third of all deaths in the United States were attributed to three major categories of infectious disease: pneumonia and influenza, tuberculosis, and diarrheal diseases and enteritis.Many additional deaths were caused by typhoid, meningococcal meningitis, scarlet fever, whooping cough, diphtheria, dysentery, and measles. Altogether, common infectious diseases accounted for 40% of all deaths in 1900 but they accounted for only 4% of all deaths in 2000. Cardiovascular disease (CVD; heart disease and stroke) accounted for 14% of all deaths in 1900 and for 37% in 2000. Cancer accounted for only 4% of all deaths in 1900 but for 23% in 2000.

 

Leading Causes of Death, 2004

 

1. Heart disease: 654,092

2. Cancer: 550,270

3. Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 150,147

4.Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 123,884

5. Accidents (unintentional injuries): 108,694

6. Diabetes: 72,815

7. Alzheimer's disease: 65,829

8. Influenza/Pneumonia: 61,472

9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis: 42,762

10. Septicemia: 33,464

11. Chronic Liver Disease 27,013

12. Homicide 22,000

13. Parkinsonís 19,544

14. Human Immuno-deficiency virus HIV 13, 063

15. Suicide 10,700

 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2009

 

4. In the US, not dissimilar to the rest of the world, in 2004 there were an estimated 250,000 deaths from what can loosely be construed as medical malpractice and product liability. 12,000 from unnecessary surgery, 7,000 from medication errors in hospitals, 20,000 from other errors in hospitals, 80,000 from infections in hospitals, 100,000 from bedsores, 106,000 from non-error, negative effects of drugs making medical malpractice the third leading cause of death, ten times the homicide rate.Another 2001 study puts the number of death attributed to medical error at 783,936 more than heart disease, 699,697 or cancer 553,251 The Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics said 12,129 state prisoners died between 2001 through 2004. For black inmates, the rate of dying was 57 percent lower than among the overall black population - 206 versus 484. But white and Hispanic prisoners both had death rates slightly above their counterparts in the overall population. The death rate among men was 72 percent higher than among women.

Estimated Annual Mortality and Economic Cost of Medical Intervention

 

Condition

Number of Deaths

Estimated Cost

Complications

Adverse Drug Reactions

106,000

$12 billion

19%

Medical Error

98,000

 

17%

Bedsores

115,000

$55 billion

10%

Nonsocomial Infection

88,000

$5 billion

5-6%

Malnutrition

108,000

 

10%

Iatrogenic Outpatient

199,000

$77 billion

25%

Surgery Related

32,000

$9 billion

30%

Total

783,936

$282 billion

 

Source: Null, Gary PhD; Dean, Carolyn MD; Feldman, Martin MD; Rasio, Deborah MD; Smith, Dorothy MD. Death by Medicine. Life Extension Magazine. 2003

 

5. Of the 2.4 million people who die in the United States annually just over 35,000 will file estate tax returns after the passing of longest surviving spouse.Fewer than half of these, about 15,000, will pay any estate tax whatsoever.Despite the low number of taxpayers estate tax liability will total $23 billion, an average of approximately $1.5 million per taxable return.†† The vast majority of estates in probate are worth less than $15,000.It is difficult to calculate the total national value of the death transfer but it is probably around $100 billion annually.In 2004 only 12 states reported their 2003 probate/estate caseloads to the Department of Justice in at least two of the four categories provided (guardianship, conservatorship/trusteeship, probate/wills/ intestate, and elder abuse). In those states, 66 percent of the cases involved probate/wills/intestate; 21 percent involved guardianship, and 13 percent involved other matters.Probate is generally a long, expensive and torturous process that estate lawyers recommend be avoided by conveying all assets to others upon death through joint tenancy, pay on death accounts and transfer on death securities.The objective of estate planning is to have no possessions when you die.A degree program is called for to supervise the Probate Courts secession of the adjudication of the alleged mentally ill to the licensed social workers of the Mental Health Board of a Social Work Administration and when the Court is slavery free to change the name to Justice of the Peace.

 

6. To process the 0.83% of the population that dies every year 0.05% of the population is employed in the death care industry.This means that there is a ratio of 16.6 dead people to every mortuary professional per year although the labor is actually divided into funeral service, cemetery maintenance and manufacturing meaning the annual caseload tends to be much higher, enough to support a comfortable living for the professional. Per death receipts for funeral services are estimated to total $4,166 for a burial and $1,080 for a cremation.†† The American funeral industry emerged in the aftermath of the Civil War.Before then families would normally bury their own dead.The foundation of the new industry was embalming that permitted family to have a last look at their loved one that was legitimized in the cross country voyage of Abraham Lincolnís body from Washington DC to Springfield, Illinois.

 

7. Since then funeral homes sprung up around the country.As funeral homes multiplied, so did a variety of professional associations organizing funeral directors at the national and state levels, trade publications exclusively catering to an emerging class of authorities of disposal, and educational institutions for the training of funeral directors.Jessica Mitfordís The American Way of Death revolutionized the death care industry in the 1960s. The Federal Trade Commission began its own investigation of the industry in the late 1970s and issued a series of proclamations based on its findings, including the Funeral Trade Rule in 1984. Some of the regulations imposed on funeral directors included providing clients with a detailed price list of all goods and services, informing them that embalming is not required by law, and allowing families to plan alternative funerals that did not follow traditional patterns. Although cremation had made its appearance on the American scene much earlier, it became a viable option in the late 1960s and grew in popularity in subsequent decades.Cremation rates at the turn of the twenty-first century rose to 25 percent.Another significant trend to emerge in the closing decades of the twentieth century was the intrusion of multinational corporations into what has become known as "death care." Inspired in part by the aging of the populous baby-boom generation, big corporations like Service Corporation International and the Loewen Group have been buying up independent, family-owned funeral homes. Even though most funeral homes are independently owned and operated, these corporations will continue to play a major role in U.S. funerals well into the twenty-first century.

 

8. Within the Department of Veteranís Affairs there is established a National Cemetery Administration responsible for the interment of deceased service members and veterans. The largest of the 130 national cemeteries is the Calverton National Cemetery, on Long Island, near Riverhead, N.Y, that conducts more than 7,000 burials each year.Funerals, in the US and Canada, can be divided into three parts, (1)Visitation, where the body is on display at the funeral home for viewing for a night or two before the funeral.The deceased is usually dressed in their best clothes.If the body is disfigured or someone is unwilling to view the body a closed casket. In Jewish funerals the body is never viewed and embalming is forbidden.Guests sign a book held by the descendants and exchange photographs, (2) Funeral Service, a memorial service that is often officiate by a clergy from the bereaved church or religion.Funerals are usually held three to five days after a personís death.The service usually involves prayers, reading from the Bible and words of comfort from the clergy.Family members and friends frequently give a eulogy to detail the happy memories and accomplishments in the life of the deceased. (3) Burial Service, is conducted at the site of the grave, tomb, mausoleum or crematorium at which the body of deceased is buried or cremated.The burial may take place immediately after the funeral whereupon a funeral procession will travel from the memorial service to the burial site or at a time when the burial site is ready.Flowers are often put on the coffin or in the case of the burial of the member of the Armed Forces the Secretary of Veteranís Affairs will provide an American flag to drape over the coffin.

 

Leading Global Causes of Death

 

Rank

0-4 years

5-14 years

15-44 years

15-59 years

60 years

All ages

1

Perinatal conditions

2,155,000

Acute lower

respiratory infections

213,429

HIV/AIDS

1,629,726

Ischaemic heart disease

887,146

Ischaemic heart disease

6,239,562

Ischaemic heart disease

7,375,408

2

Acute lower

respiratory infections

1,850,412

Malaria

209,109

Road traffic injuries

600,312

Cerebrovascular disease

600,854

Cerebrovascular disease

4,247,080

Cerebrovascular disease

5,106,125

3

Diarrhoeal diseases

1,814,158

Road traffic injuries

161,956

Interpersonal violence

509,844

Tuberculosis

407,737

Chronic obstructive

pulmonary disease

1,974,652

Acute lower respiratory

infections

3,452,178

4

Measles

887,671

Drowning

157,573

Self-inflicted injuries

508,621

Trachea/bronchus

/lung cancers

305,982

Acute lower

respiratory infections

1,184,698

HIV/AIDS

2,285,229

5

Malaria

793,368

Diarrhoeal diseases

133,883

Tuberculosis

427,314

Cirrhosis of the liver

264,117

Trachea/bronchus/

lung cancers

889,873

Chronic obstructive

pulmonary disease

2,249,252

6

Congenital

abnormalities

404,849

War injuries

57,285

War injuries

372,935

HIV/AIDS

214,571

Tuberculosis

570,513

Diarrhoeal diseases

2,219,032

7

HIV/AIDS

349,885

Nephritis/nephrosis

44,640

Ischaemic heart disease

244,556

Liver cancers

205,394

Stomach cancers

561,527

Perinatal conditions

2,155,000

8

Pertussis

345,771

Congenital abnormalities

43,056

Cerebrovascular disease

195,983

Stomach cancers

205,212

Diabetes mellitus

426,964

Tuberculosis

1,498,061

9

Tetanus

302,668

Inflammatory cardiac disease

40,802

Cirrhosis of the liver

142,445

Chronic obstructive

pulmonary disease

203,192

Colon/rectum cancer

424,463

Trachea/bronchus/

lung cancers

1,244,407

10

Protein−energy

malnutrition

214,717

HIV/AIDS

39,042

Drowning

141,922

Self-inflicted injuries

178,478

Cirrhosis of the liver

355,615

Road traffic injuries

1,170,694

11

Drowning

125,301

Fires

38,968

Fires

122,666

Road traffic injuries

172,312

Nephritis/nephrosis

307,832

Malaria

1,110,293

12

STDs excluding HIV

118,178

Cerebrovascular disease

38,349

Maternal haemorrhage

116,771

Breast cancers

132,238

Oesophaguscancers

296,550

Self-inflicted injuries

947,697

13

War injuries

103,323

Tuberculosis

38,093

Acute lower respiratory

infections

115,100

Oesophagus cancers

117,352

Liver cancers

295,756

Measles

887,671

14

Road traffic injuries

82,429

Interpersonal violence

34,938

Rheumatic heart disease

104,635

Diabetes mellitus

104,855

Inflammatory cardiac disease

268,545

Stomach cancers

822,069

15

Meningitis

60,198

Leukaemia

34,503

Liver cancers

103,131

Inflamatory cardiac disease

97,511

Self-inflicted injuries

227,724

Cirrhosis of the liver

774,563

 

Sanders, Tony J. Hospitals & Asylums. Chapter 7: National Cemeteries. 3rd Draft. 111 pgs. HA-15-4-09. www.title24uscode.org/NationalCemetery.doc

Test Questions www.title24uscode.org/cemtest.doc