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Health and Welfare (HaW)

 

A BILL

 

To supplement Chapter 3 National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers §71-§154. To treat the COVID-19 pandemic by passing the included Hydrocortisone, Eucalyptus, Lavender, or Peppermint (HELP) Act before there are any more snot nose child deaths in the 2020-2021 school year. To devaluate the dollar by the $1.5 trillion amount of the Relief Acts, including forgiveness of the up to $10 billion postal service and $250 billion state unemployment compensation loans, plus whatever it takes to reduce the usual deficit to less than 3 percent of GDP, no more than -$596 billion FY 21, less +/- $133 billion foreign currency reserve, as a percent of recovering $19.9 trillion GDP, a $1.6 trillion, 8.2 percent devaluation if the tax measures are passed or $1.8 trillion, 9.0 percent devaluation without taxes FY 21 pursuant to the Marshall Lerner Condition under 19USC§4421 and 22USC§5301 et seq . To limit global -10 percent economic contraction to less than -2 percent, because instead of causing a reduction in prices, such as UN assessment of devaluating nations in 2019, devaluation of the US dollar should uniquely appreciate the size of the dollar backed global economy by the amount the dollar is devaluated, except for real US GDP pursuant to 2020 Revised estimates: effect of changes in rates of exchange and inflation Report of the Secretary-General A/74/585 of 11 December 2019. To continue to devaluate to maintain a deficit less than 3 percent of GDP until the TCJA expires in 2025, when the advantage of taxing is the deficit would certainly be less than 3 percent of GDP. To stop passing relief acts while addicted to speed (ephedrine). To close the loophole on energy export tax by amending 26USC§4612(b) to ‘In addition, there is imposed a flat 5% energy export tax (feet) by the UN Arrears and Certain Iranian Assets Bill of 2020.’ under 26USC§7201. To pay for a third of expiring pandemic compensation beneficiaries without depleting the neglected DI trust fund, it is necessary to close the OASDI tax loophole for the rich and state employees beginning as soon as October 1, 2020 and no later than January 1, 2021 to pay for COVID-19 disabled workers and create an SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2024 and all poverty by 2030 by repealing the Adjustment to Contribution Base at Sec. 230 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§430.  To improve the accounting of outlays, surplus or deficit and debt, the Combined Statement must exclude lending and interagency transfers from agency budget requests in a new and improved outlay overview table, for equal treatment with receipts by source category pursuant to 2USC§661a(5)(A)(C). To sustain 3 percent growth in federal education outlays, exclude privately financed student lending operations from the budget request total and make the education budget rows historically consistent to facilitate auditing FY 22. To sustain 3 percent growth in federal outlays for Housing and Urban Development it is necessary to adopt a method of accounting overview that distinguishes the revenues and outlays of federal and private programs. To sustain 2.5 percent growth in public land agencies and 3 percent growth in Indian affairs outlays without trauma, it is necessary for the Interior Department to quantify and distribute their profit. To end the trade war it is necessary for tariffs to be reduced 0.97 annually from 2016 levels pursuant to the Swiss Formula for Unilateral Tariff Reduction (2007). To change the name of Homeland Security to Customs, make Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) a historically accounted Cabinet agency, transfer the Secret Service to Treasury FY 21 and account for total Customs revenues in the Combined Statement and total outlays in the Budget-in-Brief. To reauthorize the Census Bureau Annual Statistical Abstract.  

 

Be it enacted in the House and Senate Assembled

 

1st ed. 15 Sept. 2004, 2nd 1 June 2005, 3rd 18 June 2006, 4th 17 June 2007. 5th 12 June 2009, 6th 31 July 2010, 7th 17 Aug. 2011, 8th 14 July 2012, 9th 26 July 2015, 10th 7 Sept. 2015, 11th 17 Sept. 2017, 12th 22 Sept. 2018, 13th 12 November 2018, 14th 27 August 2020

 

1. Industrialized nations should be able to limit economic decline to -5 percent from 2019 if a dab of Hydrocortisone, Eucalyptus, Lavender or Peppermint (HELP) to the nose and/or chest is prescribed by public health officials to cure coronavirus and/or mold allergies to prevent escalation of the snot nosed child death in the 2020-2021 school year.  Corticosteroids are the definitive medical treatment for coronavirus.  Essential oils of eucalyptus, lavender or peppermint should be dispensed in bathroom soaps so people can wash their nose, cleansers and humidifiers to provide aromatherapy to entrances, and rooms.  Coronavirus is the only cold with a cure.  Otherwise, the extraordinarily contagious viral rhinitis descends the airways, fills the lungs with fluid and results in death.  Current - dollar GDP decreased 34.3 percent, or $2.15 trillion, in the second quarter of 2020 to a level of $19.41 trillion. In the first quarter, GDP decreased 3.4 percent, or $186.3 billion. After two quarters of decline, economic depression is certain.  The UN is estimating a -10 percent economic contraction in GWP. World Economic Situations and Prospects April 2020 Briefing No. 136 estimated a 1.7 percent best and -0.9 percent worst-case scenarios for global growth in 2020 if restriction on economic activity end by third quarter. It is now the third quarter and although some restrictions have been lifted, masks, sneeze guards and 6 feet social distance are maintained. COVID-19 rages on.  The EU and US declared a -33 percent contraction in the second quarter.  There is no denying economic depression has set in, after six months of recession. Most recent UN estimates pessimistically predict a -10 percent decline in economic activity for the entire 2020 year from 2019 levels.  In April COVID-19 was estimated to slash global economic output by $8.5 trillion over next two years. The report estimated that GDP growth in developed economies was expected to plunge -5.0 percent in 2020 if the pandemic ended in six months. Because the inefficient US relief act printed $1.5 trillion into circulation, 70 percent of the $2.15 trillion adjusted loss, a -5 percent decline in GDP seems fair FY 20. In the US the COVID-19 pandemic exhibits the highest level of unemployment since the Great Depression, four times as many the financial crisis of the Great Recession incurred a -1.7 percent decline in GWP in 2009. For the period of expansion from the second quarter of 2009 through the fourth quarter of 2019, real GDP increased at an annual rate of 2.3 percent. Usual, 3.4 percent GWP growth, less for the US 2.4 percent and EU 2.0 percent, is insufficient to make up for the lost output, expected in 2021.  Because the United Nations operates on a monetary system backed by, and quantified in the US dollar, instead of causing a reduction in prices, such as the UN assessment of devaluating nations in 2019, devaluation of the US dollar should increase the size of the global economy pursuant to the Marshall Lerner Condition 19USC§4421 and 22USC§5301 et seq and 2020 Revised estimates: effect of changes in rates of exchange and inflation Report of the Secretary-General A/74/585 of 11 December 2019.

 

United States Receipts, Outlays, Surplus or Deficit FY 16 – FY 24

(billions)

 

Year

Total Receipts

On-budget

Off-budget

Total Outlays

On-budget

Off-budget

Total Surplus or Deficit

GDP

Deficit % of GDP

FY 16

3,420

2,462

958

3,706

2,784

922

-286

19,001

1.5

FY 17

3,468

2,471

997

3,881

2,928

953

-413

19,419

2.1

FY 18

3,489

2,488

1,001

4,063

3,060

1,003

-574

19,963

2.9

FY 19

3,624

2,562

1,062

4,278

3,219

1,059

-654

20,402

3.2

FY 20

3,379

2,367

1,012

4,463

3,347

1,116

-1,084

19,382

5.6

FY 20 ta

3,379

2,367

1,012

4,525

3,347

1,178

-1,146

19,382

5.9

FY 21

3,582

2,516

1,066

6,100

4,968

1,132

-2,518 /

-1,018 /

 -596

19,866

12.7 / 5.1 / 3.0

FY 21 t

3,901

2,522

1,379

6,261

4,903

1,358

-2,360 / --860 /

 -596

19,866

11.9 / 4.3 / 3.0

FY 22

3,863

2,668

1,195

4,809

3,571

1,238

-946

20,363

4.6

FY 22 t

4,140

2,674

1,466

4,943

3,504

1,439

-903

20,363

4.4

FY 23

3,950

2,828

1,122

4,993

3,684

1,309

-1,043

20,872

5.0

FY 23 t

4,382

2,834

1,548

5,127

3,614

1,513

-745

20,872

3.6

FY 24

4,294

2,997

1,297

5,184

3,798

1,386

-890

21,294

4.2

FY 24 t

4,639

3,003

1,636

5,311

3,725

1,586

-672

21,294

3.1

Source: OMB Historical Table 2.1. 2020 Annual Report of the OASDI Trustees total revenues. FY 2021 Agency Budget Request outlay totals. t – tax.

 

2. Economic depression is certain to have a negative impact on many sources of federal revenues.  It is necessary for Congress to close the tax loopholes in the payroll tax for the rich and state employees and energy export tax, without any reservations or further denial of 2.5 percent annual payroll increase, to pay for COVID-19 disabled workers and small business owners bankrupted by the quarantine, and create a SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2024 and all poverty by 2030.  The usual deficit, not including relief acts, was preliminarily estimated at -$1 trillion FY 20 by OMB has gone up to -$1,084 billion FY 20 due to the pandemic. The good news is that the extended July 15, 2020 tax-day yielded 5 percent growth in individual income tax from April 15, 2019.  Maybe tax-day should be permanently made July 15 and the deadline for the annual social security reports summer solstice June 20-21. Despite record levels of official unemployment running 10 percent to 12 percent, individual income and payroll taxes seem to be limiting potential contraction to +/-5 percent. The $1.5 trillion federal cost of the special issue bonds, including forgiveness of up to $10 billions postal service and $250 billion state unemployment compensation loans have been deferred until fiscal year 21. To conclude the FY 20 overspending crisis painlessly, in harmony with the Euro, without again irresponsibly prolonging the economic depression with the crippling price of public debt to the stock market, the Treasury has no option but devaluate the dollar October 1, 2020, the first day of fiscal year 2021. Devaluation is estimated by the deferred price of the relief acts and deficit in excess of 3 percent of GDP, less +/- $133 billion foreign exchange currency held by the Federal Reserve as a percent of $19.4 trillion GDP.  However, GDP statistics and deficit cannot be better than wild guesstimates until the September Monthly Treasury Statement total is released and distributed by the 2020 Combined Statement and third quarter GDP estimates are released by BEA. Nonetheless, it is proposed that the US devaluate the dollar by the $1.5 trillion amount of the Relief Acts plus whatever it takes to reduce the usual deficit to less than 3 percent of GDP FY 21, no more than -$596 billion FY 21, less +/- $133 foreign currency reserve, a $1.6 trillion, 8.2 percent devaluation if the tax measures are passed or $1.8 trillion, 9.0% percent devaluation without taxes. To protect the stock market and promote the export economy, devaluation may want to be continued to offset deficits in excess of 3 percent of GDP until the tax relief for the rich from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) expires in 2025 or is defeated in the election, and the ability of usual revenue growth to sustain outlay growth is restored.  Although it might be more accurate to express estimates as a range of possibilities it seems important to produce a precise estimate to devaluate by on October 1, 2020.

 

Devaluation Equation FY 21

(billions)

 

Relief

Foreign Reserve

Adjusted Amount

GDP

Devaluation

Relief Acts

1,500

133

1,367

19,866

6.9%

3 % of GDP Deficit with Tax

1,764

133

1,631

19,866

8.2%

3% of GDP Deficit without Tax

1,922

133

1,789

19,866

9.0%

Source: Foreign Exchange Reserve June 2020

 

3. Since taking office, President Trump has unilaterally imposed numerous new tariffs on steel, aluminum, and a variety of goods from China, creating upward pressure on prices in the United States. All these tariffs are unlawful under the Swiss Formula for Unilateral Tariff Reduction (2007) and these safeguards must be limited to not more than four years unless they are substantially justified, which they are not, pursuant to Chapter XII and XIII of the General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs (1994). He has squandered his industrial support on tariffs. Based on 2019 import levels, U.S. and retaliatory tariffs currently impact over $470 billion of imports and exports, and President Trump’s tariffs are increasing annual consumer costs by roughly $57 billion annually. In 2019, the U.S. trade deficit was $616.8 billion according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census. The U.S. Imported $3.1 trillion of goods and services while exporting $2.5 trillion. The deficit is lower than in 2018 when it was $627.7 billion. The deficit is less than the record of $758 billion in 2006. The decrease since then means U.S. exports grew faster than imports, that would be good for U.S. businesses and job growth, if there were not a decline in total trade volume due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. The dollar declined by 40% against the euro from 2001 through 2007. This meant that U.S. goods and services were 40% cheaper for Europeans. That made U.S. companies more competitive, increasing exports. The 2008 recession offset this advantage, causing global trade to decline. U.S. goods exports dropped from $1.3 trillion in 2008 to $1.1 trillion in 2009. Imports fell from $2.1 trillion in 2008 to $1.6 trillion in 2009. Both exports and imports have risen since then. This was despite the continued strength of the dollar since 2009, due to the eurozone crisis weakening of the euro. The dollar briefly weakened in 2017 but strengthened in 2018 through 2020. That's hurt exports. Although not as useful a statistic for determining solvency as the budget deficit or surplus, international trade deficit or surplus is widely respected as an indicator of credit-worthiness and is added to the budget deficit or surplus to produce the current account balance. CBO The Budget and Economic Outlook 2020-2030 released in January 2020, just before the COVID-19 pandemic reduced the total volume of international trade, admits increases in tariffs reduce U.S. economic activity in three ways. First, they make consumer goods and capital goods more expensive, thereby reducing the purchasing power of U.S. consumers and Some of those tariffs apply to imports from nearly all U.S. trading partners, including tariffs on washing machines, solar panels, U.S. imports in 2017. Second, they increase businesses’ uncertainty about future barriers to trade. Such uncertainty leads some U.S. businesses to delay or forgo new investments or make costly adjustments to their supply chains. Third, they prompt retaliatory tariffs by U.S. trading partners, which reduce U.S. exports by making them more expensive for foreign purchasers. All of those effects lower U.S. output. U.S. consumers and businesses replace certain imported goods with goods produced in the United States, which offsets some of that decline. In addition, tariff revenues, by reducing the deficit, increase the resources available for private investment in later years. However, skyrocketing total Customs revenues are widely suspected to be fraudulent and are to be impounded aiming to eliminate language contrary to tariff reductions or total customs revenues.

 

Current Account Balance 2016-2020

(billions)

 

Balance

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Exports

2,209

2,351

2,500

2,500

2,108

Imports

2,712

2,903

3,121

3,100

2,660

Trade Balance

-503

-552

-621

-617

-552

Revenues

3,420

3,468

3,489

3,624

3,379

Expenditures

3,706

3,881

4,063

4,278

4,463

Deficit

-286

-413

-574

-654

-1,084

Current Account Balance

-789

-965

-1,195

-1,271

-1,636

Source: Census Bureau, 2019. Monthly US International Trade in Goods and Services. June 2020 Year-to-date, the goods and services deficit decreased -7.8 percent, from the same period in 2019. Exports decreased -15.7 percent. Imports decreased -14.2 percent.

 

4. In fiscal year 2020 it is estimated that there will be a -5 percent decline in individual income tax receipts, -18 percent decline in corporate income tax, -5 percent decline in (Medicare) on-budget social insurance, -7 percent decline in social security and unemployment contributions, a -50% decline in excise taxes due to the double whammy of -40 percent declines in fuel and airport receipts and reauthorization of the $1 per gallon Blenders Tax Credit (BTC) retroactive to 2018. A six percent decrease in other taxes is anticipated. In fiscal year 2021, and thereafter, provided the dollar is devaluated to prevent excessive withdrawal from the stock market, a six percent increase in all categories of revenues is expected from FY 2020 low. The cost of the BTC is expected to decline from $10 billion to $3 billion in 2021, providing an addition $7 billion to excise tax revenues in 2021. Closing the tax loophole for energy exports is estimated to provide an additional $6 billion in Customs receipts in 2021. It is hoped this credit will be exchanged for the more reasonable price of renewable fuel 24.4 cents per gallon excise tax exemption when it expires in 2022. Declining fuel taxes that are not indexed to increase with inflation, and repressed airport revenues, are expected to cause the Department of Transportation to decouple from the excise taxes, report total revenues and request the federal government to pay reasonable inflation of all costs, just like Customs to eliminate contempt of -3 percent annual Swiss Formula for Unilateral Tariff Reductions (2007).  To create sustainable customs revenue growth and respond to demand from National Geographic and the United Nations, the United States must close the loophole on energy export tax by replacing 26USC§4612(b) – ‘In addition, there is imposed a flat 5% energy export tax (feet) by the UN Arrears and Certain Iranian Assets Bill of 2020.’ under 26USC§7201. To pay for a third of expiring pandemic compensation beneficiaries without depleting the neglected DI trust fund, it is fiscally necessary to close the OASDI tax loophole for the rich and state employees beginning as soon as October 1, 2020 and no later than January 1, 2021 to pay for COVID-19 disabled workers and create an SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2024 and all poverty by 2030 by repealing the Adjustment to Contribution Base at Sec. 230 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§430.  These measures are integral to the proposed Hydrocortisone, Eucalyptus, Lavender or Peppermint (HELP) Act of 2020.

 

Preliminary Pandemic Revised Revenues FY 16 – FY 24

(billions)

 

Fiscal Year

Individual Income Taxes

Corporate Income Taxes

Social Insurance and Retirement Receipts

On-budget

Off-budget

Excise Taxes

Other

Total

On-budget

Off-budget

2016

1,546

300

1,147

312

835

95

212

3,297

2,462

835

2017

1,587

297

1,191

317

874

84

186

3,345

2,471

874

2018

1,684

205

1,209

326

883

108

185

3,391

2,508

883

2019

1,718

230

1,284

343

941

108

163

3,503

2,562

941

2020

1,632

202

1,201

326

875

54

153

3,242

2,367

875

2021

1,730

214

1,274

346

928

64

162

3,444

2,516

928

2021t

1,730

214

1,580

346

1,234

64

168

3,756

2,522

1,234

2022

1,834

227

1,351

367

984

68

172

3,652

2,668

984

2022t

1,834

227

1,675

367

1,308

68

178

3,982

2,674

1,308

2023

1,944

241

1,432

389

1,043

72

182

3,871

2,828

1,043

2023t

1,944

241

1,776

389

1,387

72

188

4,221

2,834

1,387

2024

2,061

255

1,517

412

1,105

76

193

4,102

2,997

1,105

2024t

2,061

255

1,882

412

1,470

76

199

4,473

3,003

1,470

Source: 2020 OMB Revenues Table 2.1, 2.4 and 2.5, t – closure of OASDI and energy export tax loopholes

 

5. Usual federal spending inflation is estimated to grow 2.5 percent for government, 3 percent for services, education, minimum wage, cost-of-living adjustment, 3.3 percent for food stamps, 4 percent for disability and child welfare and 5.5 percent for retirement annually. Any shortfall is due compensation for deprivation of relief under 18USC§246 pursuant to the Application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (The Gambia v. Myanmar) Summary 2020/1 23 January 2020 and Art. 14 of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT)(1987).  The experience of Trump budget cut threats is that compensation for domestic agencies ends up costing more than usual inflation and arrears to the UN are mounting.  The Combined Statement overview of outlays is inadequate and outlays by agency must be entered from agency congressional budget requests and added up. As the result of neglecting to tabulate outlays, as they do for revenues, the Combined Statement totally fails to enable OMB to distinguish between budget authority and interagency transfers that must be excluded from the President's budget to eliminate OMBs 12 percent margin of error overestimating outlays. Government outlays are responsible only for administrative and loan guaranty costs. All other [interagency transfers] and lending costs are [privately financed] and should not have any incidental effects on the tabulation of governmental receipts or outlays under 2USC§661a(5)(A)(C). The new Combined Statement outlay and undistributed offsetting receipt overview table must outlaw fictitious, interagency transfer, lending, etc. unoriginal outlays from the budget request as they do for the revenue by source category. To sustain 3 percent growth in federal education outlays, exclude privately financed student lending operations from the budget request total and make the education budget rows historically consistent to facilitate auditing FY 22. To sustain 3 percent growth in federal outlays for Housing and Urban Development it is necessary to adopt a method of accounting overview that distinguishes the revenues and outlays of federal and private programs. To sustain 2.5 percent growth in public land agencies and 3 percent growth in Indian affairs outlays without trauma, it is necessary for the Interior Department to quantify and distribute their profit.  For their part, the Combined Statement must agree to the definition of undistributed offsetting receipts often called advanced appropriations – unspent funds remaining at the end of year that are used to reduce the deficit and pay the first obligations of the new year – and rename the undistributed offsetting receipt revenue category “earnings on investments”. CBO must cross-examine the outlays by agency and undistributed offsetting receipts table pursuant to the HELP Act.

 

Government Outlays by Agency Ledger FY 16 – FY 24

(billions)

 

FY 16

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 20

FY 21

FY 22

FY 23

FY 24

Total On-budget Outlays

2,784

2,928

3,060

3,219

3,347

4,968 / 4,903

3,571 / 3,504

3,684 / 3,614

3,798 / 3,725

Legislative Branch

4.4

4.7

4.8

4.9

5.0

5.2

5.3

5.5

5.6

Judicial Branch

6.8

6.9

7.0

7.2

7.5

7.8

8.0

8.3

8.5

Department of Agriculture

134

146

146

139

150

146

150

153

157

Department of Commerce

9.2

9.3

9.2

9.8

17.6

9.5

9.7

10.0

10.2

Department of Defense – Military Programs

565

606

671

685

718

705

726

748

770

Department of Education

74.0

73.9

76.5

77.2

80.5

83.2

85.7

88.3

90.9

Department of Energy

29

30.5

30

35.6

38.5

36

37.1

38.2

39.2

Department of Health and Human Services

1,002

1,055

1,063

1,176

1,226

1,301

1,340

1,380

1,422

Department of Homeland Security

50.6

50.6

57

59.1

60.3

61.3

63.1

70.0

70.0

Department of Housing and Urban Development

49

48

47.7

51.6

56.2

62.9

64.8

66.8

70.0

Department of the Interior

13.4

13.6

13.5

15.1

15.3

15.8

16.2

16.6

17.0

Department of Justice

27.5

27.9

27.8

30

32.4

31.7

32.5

33.4

34.2

Department of Labor

46.5

45.4

44.1

40.5

40.4

43.9

45.2

46.6

48.0

Department of State and International Assistance

55.5

55.4

56.4

56.5

55.9

66.6

68.3

70.0

71.7

Department of Transportation

75.1

77.1

87

87.4

87

88.7

91.4

94.1

96.9

Department of the Treasury

540

550.7

602.3

630.5

666.4

2,183

700.0

717.2

735.1

Department of Veteran's Affairs

163.3

183.3

197.4

201.4

220.6

243.3

253

263

274

Corps of Engineers – Civil Works

4.7

4.6

4.7

4.8

4.9

5.0

5.2

5.3

5.5

Environmental Protection Agency

8.1

8.3

8

8.8

9.1

9.4

9.6

9.9

10.1

Executive Office of the President

0.753

0.761

0.755

0.400

0.424

0.413

0.423

0.434

0.445

Federal Emergency Management Administration

15.7

23.6

30.1

21.7

27.3

14.5

14.9

15.4

15.8

General Services Administration and Office of Personnel Management

53.9

63.9

57.3

59.3

59.3

53.9

55.5

57.1

58.9

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

19.3

19.7

19.6

21.5

22.6

25.3

26.1

26.8

27.7

National Science Foundation

7.5

7.5

7.4

8.2

8.3

8.5

8.7

8.9

9.2

Small Business Administration

0.820

0.841

0.890

0.675

0.991

0.748

0.767

0.786

0.806

Social Security Administration (on-budget)

58.9

59.5

59.3

60.6

62.2

64.6 / 0

67.2 / 0

69.9 / 0

72.7 / 0

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

-231

-245

-269

-274

-326

-304

-314

-320

-324

Total On-budget Outlays

2,784

2,928

3,060

3,219

3,347

4,968 / 4,903

3,571 / 3,504

3,684 / 3,614

3,798 / 3,725

Total Off-budget Outlays (Trustees)

922.3

952.5

1,003

1,059

1,116 / 1,194

1,203 / 1,358

1,238 / 1,439

1,309 / 1,513

1,386 / 1,586

Total Outlays

3,881

4,063

4,278

4,463

4,340 / 4,541

6,171 / 6,261

4,809 / 4,943

4,993 / 5,127

5,184 / 5,311

Source: FY 21 Agency Budget Requests, no tax / tax

 

6. A fundamental principle of the FY 21 budget is that persecutions regarding the number of the beast, should not last more than 42 months (Revelation 13:10). Department of Defense spending has been rapidly increasing 4.6 percent annually from $606 billion FY 17 to $718 billion FY 20 before declining to $705 billion FY 21 after which time normal three percent growth is anticipated. The prophecy underlying the COVID-19 pandemic economic depression is mostly that Treasury spending grew slowly from $602 billion FY 18 to $666 FY 20. Having concealed the number of the beast in the addition of discretionary and mandatory funding, they do not perform although the total is what is reported by OMB, Treasury spending was not projected to grow fast enough without justifying a $1.5 trillion Relief Act FY 21 driving up Treasury spending to an estimated $2,183 billion FY 21 with a will to achieve $700 billion in outlays FY 22. There are dozens of number of the beast settlements accelerating growth to make the leap from numeral 6 to 7 in less 42 months, 3 ½ years. The cost is negligible in comparison with the happiness it brings to do this curse justice. The $66.6 billion FY 21 education discretionary budget cut request, from $72.87 billion FY 20 is a crime of genocide that must be highly suspected as being causative of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as representative of nationwide school closures for which education institutions must receive full-funding. The UN is burdened by an obese Secretary-General who has accursed the Peacekeeping with budget cuts from $7.8 billion 2016-2017 to $6.5 billion 2019-2020 and not published a budget for 2020-2021 in time for the June 30 fiscal year. Paying arrears brings State Department spending from $55.9 FY 20 to $66.6 billion FY 21 and with this head start and normal 2.5 percent growth is expected to reach $70 billion FY 23. Appropriation of hyper-inflationary Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) responsibilities to justify growth in excess of 3 percent annually by the US Marshal and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is expressed as a $6 billion budget for ICE aiming to abolish unwarranted deportation agency within 42 months.

 

United Nations Regular and Peacekeeping Assessed Contributions FY 16 – FY 21

(millions)

 

Assessment

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 20

FY 21 proposal

Regular

2,842

2,699

2,699

3,065

3,142

22%

625

594

594

674

691

US Payment

593

610

591

674

474

Arrears

26

10

13

13

230

Peacekeeping

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

Requirement

7,874

6,803

6,690

6,519,

8,661

US Share

28.5738%

28.4691%

28.4344%

27.8912%

27.8908%

Assessment

2,250

1,937

1,902

1,818

2,416

US Payment

2,245

1,382

1,551

1,526

1,076

Arrears

5

560

911

1,203

2,543

Source: State Department, Foreign Operations and Related Programs FY 19 – FY 21 Programme Budget UN General Assembly Document A/72/6/Add 1, A/C.5/71/25; 2020 Revised estimates: effect of changes in rates of exchange and inflation Report of the Secretary-General A/74/585 of 11 December 2019; Approved resources for peacekeeping operations for the period from 1 July to 30 June; A/C.5/70/24 (2016-2017), A/C.5/71/24 (2017-2018), A/C.5/72/25 (2018-2019), A/C.5/73/21 (2019-2020); Scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of United Nations peacekeeping operations A/70/331/Add.1 (2016-2018), A/73/350 Add. 1 (2019-2021). US UN peacekeeping share of 27.88% (2019), 27.8796% (2020-2021) altered by A/73/350 Add. 1 US 27.8912% (2019), 27.8908% (2020-2021) on 3 July 2019.

7. Customs fiscal year budget must report total customs revenues and total customs outlays and the Customs shall deposit all revenues in the Treasury who shall pay all Customs outlays. As of FY 21 the Secret Service is to be transferred back to Treasury. To accurately account for Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) supplementals is necessary that the total Customs budget must be historically subtract the amount of FEMA budget request, to produce total Federal Outlays for Customs. Customs must defend the sources of their skyrocketing revenue and law enforcement outlay declarations. Tariff increases since FY 17 and Customs revenue growth since FY 18 are excessive. Safeguard measure, such as tariff barriers imposed by the Trump Administration, have been outlawed Swiss Formula on Unilateral Tariff Reduction (2007) and must end after four years because they are unjustifiable and incur retaliation under Arts. XII and XIX of the General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs (1994). Title X of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (ICA), that created the House and Senate Budget Committees and the Congressional Budget Office, does not apply to budget authority proposed to be rescinded under 2USC§684(c) because it is determined to be excessive under 31USC§1517(a)(2) and §1514(a)(2).  As an industrialized nation United States tariffs must decrease by 3 percent, 0.97 annually pursuant to the Swiss Formula on Unilateral Tariff Reduction (2007). To make amends for unlawful tariff increases between 2017 and 2020, it is suggested that tariffs be reduced 0.97 annually since 2016. To accurately account for total customs revenues and total customs outlays national accountants shall report total customs revenues and total customs outlays and not attempt to reduce the outlay total with any percentage of customs revenues. All Customs receipts shall be deposited into the Treasury and the Treasury shall pay for all Customs outlays. The USDA FY 21 budget requested delinking Sec. 32 funds with Customs revenues. The Treasury Office of Fiscal Services Combined Statement shall review the disturbing language and Congress amend any statute justifying such unaccountable sharing of Customs receipts with the General Fund.  It is possible that Customs revenues might be significantly higher if cost-sharing were outlawed and because this is the right thing to do, the reason for the increase in Customs revenues may be that have already started reporting total receipts.  The withholding on wages of non-resident aliens under 26USC§1441 must be repealed. Customs may not count the tax withholdings of non-resident aliens on trial or deported as customs revenues. Their social security contributions count towards the full 40 quarters of contributions it takes aliens to qualify for benefits. The March Treasury Statement ruled all taxes assigned to individual income and payroll tax shall be completely immune from customs duties pursuant to Sec. 207 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§407. The increase in fees for visas must be repealed. Immigrants shall be granted a social security number and employment authorization free of charge. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) beneficiaries shall be sold a US Passport, that indicates their citizenship of US or stateless, pursuant to common Arts. 26-29 of the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (1951) and Stateless Persons (1954).

 

Customs Receipts by Source 2019

(millions)

 

Category of Customs Duties

FY 2019

Duties on Imports

50,268

Refunds and Drawbacks, United States Customs Service (indefinite), Treasury

-2,677

Import Duties on Arms and Ammunition

41

30% of Customs Duties, Funds for Strengthening Markets, Income and Supply (Section 32)

21,504

3.08 Percent of Custom duties, Agricultural Disaster Relief Trust Fund, Farms Service Agency, Agriculture

0.028

Transfers from General Fund of Amounts Equal to Certain Customs Duties, Reforestation trust Fund, Forest Service

30

Custom Duties, Aquatic Resources Trust Fund, Sport Fish Restoration

63

Transfers from General Fund of Amounts Equal to Certain Taxes, Harbor Maintenance Trust fund

1,555

Total, Customs Duties

70,784

Immigration, Passport and Consular Fees

664

Breached Bond Penalties, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security

8

Temporary L-1 Visa Fee Increase, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Homeland Security

12

Temporary H-1B Visa Fee Increase, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service, Homeland Security

47

Total Customs Duties and Fees

71,515

Source: 2019 Combined Statement Receipts by Source Categories

 

8. The 2020 Annual Reports of the OASDI Trustees and SSI Program did not take into consideration the low revenues and high costs of the COVID-19 pandemic.  The responsibility to pay COVID-19 pandemic disabled workers and their families looms large.  Due to the dynamic changes to revenues and expenditures as the result of the COVID-19 pandemic, all estimates are extremely hypothetical and certain to be revised in the aftermath.  The UN has estimated a 10% decrease in the economy from the previous year, but it may be worse. 32 million unemployment compensation beneficiaries constitute 18% of the total workforce, significantly more than the 10% to 12% official unemployment rate. The European Union has declared as much as a 30% economic decline for a third the cost of the Relief Acts that have sustained retail sales in the United States, but the payroll tax is certain to be devastated. Due to the severity of the economic collapse -10% decline in payroll taxes from 2019 to 2020.  Treasury Statements are more optimistic and – 7 percent decline has been posited, but as mentioned the final results are not in.  Because the objective is to tax the rich low revenue estimates, don’t hurt. The tax on the rich and state employees, beginning January 1, 2021 can only afford to pay a third, 9 million benefits, the intermediate cost, out of 32 million receiving pandemic compensation from March 1 to July 31 the high cost is not affordable and therefore estimates are not bothered with. There shall be no denying that being out of work due to the COVID-19 pandemic is a disability. Congress must close the tax loophole for SSA to afford to pay as many as a third of pandemic compensation claims and slightly increase total SSI program spending from $62 billion in 2020 to $70 billion in 2021 (Revelation 13:10). It is assumed that the slight OASI overestimate is right for once, the lion's share of the tax will go to the DI Trust Fund to pay for COVID-19 pandemic disabled workers and their families, the remainder, including prospective return to work of disabled workers after the economy has recovered from COVID-19 pandemic, shall go to the new SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2024 with and all poverty by 2030.

 

Social Security Administration Budget Estimates 2020-2021

(billions)

 

Year

Total Revenues

Tax Revenues

GF Reimbursement

Tax on Benefits

Net interest (3%)

Total Costs

Scheduled Benefits

Administrative Costs

R&R Interchange

Net Increase end of year

Assets at end of Year

Trust fund Ratio

2020 SSI

61.3

n/a

61.3

n/a

n/a

61.3

56.9

4.4

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

OASDI

1,111

992.7

0

40.5

77.7

1,111

1,099

6.6

5.3

0.2

2,898

272

1.8

143.9

139.4

0

1.6

2.9

147.9

145.1

2.7

0.1

-4.0

89.1

66

10.6

967.0

853.3

0

38.9

74.8

962.8

953.7

3.9

5.2

4.2

2,809

291

SSA

1,172

992.7

61.3

40.5

77.7

1,172

1,156

11.0

5.3

0.2

2,898

260

2020 SSI Pan.

62.2

n/a

62.2

n/a

n/a

62.2

57.7

4.5

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

OASDI

1,012

893.5

0

40.6

77.6

1,116

1,104

7.0

5.3

-104

2,794

260

1.8 Pan Low.

130.0

125.5

0

1.7

2.8

152.8

149.9

3.0

0.1

-22.8

70.3

61

10.6

881.7

768.0

0

38.9

74.8

962.8

953.7

4.0

5.2

-81.1

2,728

291

SSA

1,074

893.5

62.2

40.6

77.6

1,178

1,161

11.5

5.3

-104

2,794

272

2020 SSI Pan.

62.2

n/a

62.2

n/a

n/a

62.2

57.7

4.5

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

OASDI

1,012

893.5

0

40.6

77.6

1,116

1,104

7.0

5.3

-104

2,794

260

2.06 Pan. Low

152.9

148.4

0

1.7

2.8

152.8

149.9

3.0

0.1

0.1

93.2

61

10.34

858.8

745.1

0

38.9

74.8

962.8

953.7

4.0

5.2

-104

2,701

291

SSA

1,012

893.5

0

40.6

77.6

1,178

1,161

11.5

5.3

-104

2,794

260

2020 SSI Pan.

62.2

n/a

62.2

n/a

n/a

62.2

57.7

4.5

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

OASDI

1,012

893.5

0

40.6

77.6

1,132

1,120

7.0

5.3

-120

2,778

256

1.8 Pan. Int.

130.0

125.5

0

1.7

2.8

168.7

165.8

4.0

0.1

-38.7

54.4

55

10.6

881.7

768.0

0

38.9

74.8

962.8

953.7

4.0

5.2

-81.1

2,728

291

SSA

1,074

893.5

62.2

40.6

77.6

1,194

1,177

11.5

5.3

-120

2,778

256

2020 SSI Pan.

62.2

n/a

62.2

n/a

n/a

62.2

57.7

4.5

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

OASDI

1,012

893.5

0

40.6

77.6

1,132

1,120

7.0

5.3

-120

2,778

256

2.3

170.2

165.7

0

1.7

2.8

168.7

165.8

4.0

0.1

1.5

94.6

55

10.1

841.5

727.8

0

38.9

74.8

962.8

953.7

4.0

5.2

-121

2,684

291

SSA

1,012

893.5

62.2

40.6

77.6

1,194

1,177

11.5

5.3

-120

2,778

256

2021 SSI

61.2

n/a

61.2

n/a

n/a

61.2

56.7

4.5

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

OASDI

1,150

1,031

0

43.9

80.8

1,179

1,167

6.4

5.0

-29

2,869

239

1.8

154.2

149.7

0

1.7

2.8

158.8

155.9

2.8

0.1

-4.6

78.3

52

10.6

995.6

881.4

0

42.2

72.0

1,020

1,011

3.6

4.9

-24.4

2,785

272

SSA

1,211

1,031

61.2

43.9

80.8

1,240

1,224

10.9

5.0

-29

2,869

239

2021 SSI Pan.

64.6

n/a

64.6

n/a

n/a

64.6

60.0

4.6

n/a

n/a