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To supplement Chapter 3 National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers §71-§154. The FY 17 surplus was sabotaged by a -5% decline in individual income tax growth from an average annual rate of 8% 1990-2016 to 2.7% FY 17, up to 4.6% FY 18, before the loss of $25 billion in taxes from over-ruled federal government layoffs, reduces revenue growth to 1.7% FY 19. By removing [student loans savings] in brackets from the President's education budget total, FY 17 will be finally enacted. The final enactment of the $14,294 billion debt ceiling, in the final week of FY 18, is that Congress has only $40 billion left to pay $90 billion in arrears for shortfalls from annual 2.5% government and energy, 3% services and food stamp growth since FY 16, thereby recapitalizing lending programs with [31USC§3101]. CR 18 agrees to adjust for CMS and OASI outlay overestimates. FY 18 settles with a 2.1% DI tax rate beginning in 2018 by amendment of Sec. 201(b)(1)(T) of the Social Security Act under 42USC§401(b)(1)(T). Congress must decide if they have already reduced the debt by $2 trillion by deleting six fictitious rows from OMB Historical Table 4.1, before raising the debt ceiling FY 19. The Federal Reserve is advised to lower interest rates to highest rate able to return more than last year to the Treasury. FEMA is advised to solicit matching funds from local government permits, and again from construction loans after a disaster. The final profit of FY 18 pays $1 billion arrears for UNESCO and Palestine-as-International Military Finance-goes under 18USC§2339C, 5USC§3110(b), 2USC§632(b)(8), §633(g) and 28CFR§0.47. Congress must repeal 22USC§7204 because 'economic sanctions' and inability to sell travel documents <$10 are impeachable conduct under Art. 1 Sec. 9 Cl. 1 of, and the XXV Amendment to, the US Constitution. ICE should be abolished under Art. 22 of the Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families (1990). The Authority for Employment of the FBI and DEA Senior Executive Service under 5USC§3151-§3152 must be repealed. CR 18 + 3% annual armed services growth settles Defense arrears with new missile defense system. OCO budget reporting must be repealed from Title 2 Chapter 17A and the due date for the Annual Reports amended from April 1 to the 'summer solstice June 20-21' in Sec. 1161 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§1320c-10. Congress must guarantee FY 19 levels of outlays 2.5% government and energy 3% services and food stamp outlay annual growth from FY 16, and 3.3% food stamp and 4% cash benefit outlay growth for SSI, DI and TANF from the previous year, and 6% OASI outlay growth; debt will not exceed 3% of GDP and 8% average annual payroll and individual income tax revenue growth will sustain an actual surplus. Low income workers and beneficiaries need a 3% COLA every year inflation runs 2.5% - 3%, and the trust fund ratio is >20% to re-interpret Sec. 215(i) of the Social Security Act under 42USC§415(i). Federal minimum wage must be amended from $7.25 an hour to '$7.50 in 2019 and 3% more every year thereafter.' under 29USC§206(a)(1)(D). To end child poverty by 2020 tax loopholes for Title I and the rich in Section 230 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§430 must be repealed. The 12.4% OASDI FICA tax adjusts 2.3% SSI 2.1% DI 8.0% OASI.

 

Be it enacted in the House and Senate Assembled

 

1st ed. 15 Sept. 2004, 2nd 1 June 2005, 3rd 18 June 2006, 4th 17 June 2007. 5th 12 June 2009, 6th 31 July 2010, 7th 17 Aug. 2011, 8th 14 July 2012, 9th 26 July 2015, 10th 7 Sept. 2015, 11th 17 Sept. 2017, 12th 21 Sept. 2018

 

1. Title 24 US Code Chapter 3 National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, in preserved only in Subchapter V Battle Mountain Sanitarium Reserve under 24USC§151-154. The timetable with respect to the congressional budget process for any fiscal year is set forth under 2USC§631. After two years, the President has finally produced OMB Historical Tables in .pdf and Excel, in time for the supplemental budget request deadline of July 16, 2018. The final enactment of the $14,294 billion debt ceiling, in the final week of FY 18, is that Congress has only $40 billion left on the public debt limit, with which to pay $90 billion in arrears for shortfalls from annual 2.5% government and energy, 3% services and food stamp growth since FY 16, thereby recapitalizing lending and infrastructural programs with [31USC§3101].  Congress must hold an emergency session to pay $1 billion - $550 million arrears and $85.7 million current year United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and no less than $364 million FY 18 dues to discrimination against Palestine + FY 19 budget estimate, the better of 3% growth from FY11 or FY 16. Congress owes a total of $30 billion arrears to welfare programs after CR 18 and will owe an addition additional $52.5 billion welfare arrears FY 19, if the President's proposed budget cuts are not again laboriously overturned by final settlement on 2.5% government, 3% services, from FY 16 and 4% growth in cash benefit outlays from previous year under Art. 19 of the UN Charter.  Increasing the debt ceiling [$500 billion] annually, would separate the wheat from the shaft. Global hunger increased in 2016. In 2017, the number of undernourished people is estimated to have reached 821 million – around one person out of every nine in the world. Although stunting is decreasing 151 million children under five have stunted growth, while the lives of over 50 million children in the world continue to be threatened by wasting.  Settlement of 3% growth from FY 16 for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) outlays seems to be to increase 4% annual growth for five years, benefits increase 2.7% with inflation and the population by 1.3%, after a five-year enrollment period, benefits will grow 2.7% and population 0.3% annually, provided inflation remains between 2.5% and 3%, to re-interpret the Thrifty Food Plan.  Interdepartmental cooperation is resolved by fully funding the IRS and international agriculture assistance P.L. 480.  SSA 18 is the only way for Congress to remain under a very low debt ceiling of $14.3 trillion with $40 billion clearance to pay $90 billion arrears before the end of FY 18. Congress must repeal 22USC§7204 that entraps the President and Treasury to be impeached for the conduct of 'economic sanctions', including tariffs in excess of 6%, and inability to sell travel documents for less than $10 under Art. 1 Sec. 9 Cl. 1 of, and the 25th Amendment to, the US Constitution. By 2020 individual income tax and customs duty revenue growth from non-discriminatory travel document sales, energy export tax and normal federal revenue and spending growth, might yield on-budget surplus, especially if consumer economic growth and SSI costs were sustained by taxing the rich the full 12.4% OASDI tax on all their income to create an SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2020 and all poverty by 2030.  Vote to confirm the Message of the Public Trustees and sign the book, by appointing the author with a once-in-a-lifetime promotion from $693 (2018) to $2,000 (2019) a month disability under 24USC§422(d)(1). Procedure to effect compliance under 24CFR§1.8.

 

Actual Debt FY 15 – FY 20

(billions)

 

Year

Actual Surplus or Deficit

Actual Debt

% of GDP

FY 15

-564

-18,120

100.8%

CR 15

-500

-13,117

73%

FY 16

-307

-18,427

99%

CR 16

-307

-13,424

72%

FY 17

-665

-19,092

98%

CR 17

-534

-13,958

72%

HA 17

-382

-13,806

71%

FY 18

-832

-19,924

99%

CR 18

-455

-14,413

72%

SSA 18 pass

-448

-14,254

71%

HA 18

-543

-14,349

71%

FY 19

-984

-19,908

96%

CR 19

-664

-15,077

73%

HA 19

-536

-14,790

71%

SSI 19

-435

-14,689

71%

FY 20

-987

-20,895

97%

HA 20

-525

-15,315

72%

SSI 20

-414

-15,103

70%

Source: President, Congress, Hospitals & Asylums

 

2. The hypothetical FY 17 surplus, that might have been evident with OMB's 12% margin of error by FY 18 – FY 20, was sabotaged by decline in individual income tax growth by -5% from an average annual rate of 8% 1990-2016 to 2.7% FY 17, up to 4.6% FY 18, before the loss of $25 billion in taxes from threatened federal government layoffs, already overruled by the federal Court, is expected to drive revenue growth down to 1.7% FY 19.  OMB has an unreliable method outlay deflators that get the present wrong and are wildly inaccurate regarding the future with low growth FY 19 followed by high growth FY 20, in line with individual income tax estimates, all of which must be overruled for 3% growth, to create a conservative estimate for revenue reform to improve upon.  BEA Quarterly reports 2.2% 1st quarter, 4.4% 2nd quarter for 3.3% economic growth in 2018 and is projected to average 3% thereafter.  The stock market is booming.  Employment is up, unemployment down.  The federal government needs to stop attempting to cut IRS funding and staffing and collect legal tax revenues.  There is a negative trend in tobacco tax and interest rates are driving down Federal Reserve deposits remitted to the Treasury. Fuel and health insurance excise taxes are booming. The truth drives up the historical outlays for Homeland Security for nearly the same customs revenues. By removing [student loans] in brackets from the concurrent resolution, the FY 17 deficit will be finally enacted. Due to zero on-budget revenue growth FY 17 – FY 19 and low off-budget payroll tax FY 17, it is necessary for the Senate to reject arrears FY 18 and agree only to CR 18 and HA 18 Department of Health and Human Services deficit reduction by advance appropriation and most accurate CMS or Trustee estimate, and adjust for the OASI outlay overestimate with a 2.1% DI tax rate for the intermediate projection, to create an actual off-budget surplus with which to tax the rich fairly for an SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2020 and all poverty by 2030.

 

Actual Receipts, Outlays, Surplus or Deficit FY 16 – FY 20

(billions)

 

Year

Total Receipts

On-budget

Off-budget

Total Outlays

On-budget

Off-budget

Total Surplus or Deficit

% of GDP

FY 16

3,388

2,430

958

-3,695

-2,772

-922

-307

1.6%

FY 17

3,268

2,458

810

-3,982

-3,180

-801

-665

3.4%

CR 17

3,439

2,443

997

-3,973

-3,021

-953

-534

2.7%

HA 17

3,439

2,443

997

-3,821

-2,869

-953

-382

2.0%

FY 18

3,340

2,488

853

-4,173

-3,316

-857

-832

4.1%

CR 18

3,458

2,457

1,001

-3,912

-2,910

-1,003

-455

2.2%

SSA 18

3,458

2,457

1,001

-3,906

-2,910

-996

-448

2.2%

HA 18

3,458

2,457

1,001

-4,001

-3,006

-996

-543

2.7%

FY 19

3,422

2,517

905

-4,407

-3,494

-913

-984

4.7%

CR 19

3,546

2,484

1,066

-4,210

-3,148

-1,062

-664

3.2%

HA 19

3,587

2,509

1,061

-4,124

-3,072

-1,052

-536

2.6%

SSI 19

3,858

2,509

1,349

-4,268

-3,072

-1,197

-435

2.1%

FY 20

3,609

2,668

941

-4,596

-3,623

-973

-987

4.6%

HA 20

3,774

2,653

1,121

-4,299

-3,186

-1,113

-525

2.5%

SSI 20

4,091

2,653

1,434

-4,479

-3,186

-1,293

-414

1.9%

Source: President, Congress, Hospitals & Asylums

 

3. On-budget revenues are estimated to remain at $2.5 trillion FY 16 - FY 19. Aside from a moderate annual decrease in smoking since the unfair tobacco tax act of 2009, the reason for the stagnation in total revenues is a 5% slowing in the growth of individual income tax from an average annual rate of 8% to 3% due to repressive immigration policies, and major decreases in revenues from corporate, estate and gift taxes under the TCJA and a decrease in Federal Reserve Deposits remitted to the Treasury due to interest rate hikes from an all- time low of 0.25% 2009-2016. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, Public Law 115-97, was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Federal Reserve is highly recommended to reduce interest rates to 0.25%-0.5% in order to sustain growth in Federal Reserve Deposit remittances to the Treasury. There is no denying at 9% growth Historical Tables FY 17 overestimated revenues FY 17 however current revenue estimates, do not add up and have never accurately distinguished between on and off-budget payroll taxes and total off-budget revenues, slightly underreporting total and on-budget revenues. OMB must abandon the 1.8% FY 19 growth and 6.1% FY 20 growth method of expressing the range of uncertainty in economic projections and aim to please with fully financing IRS employment to achieve an annual rate revenue growth greater than 3% annually, under the TCJA.  Federal revenues have historically grown at a significantly faster rate than the general economy or federal spending. 8% average individual income tax revenue growth is the only reason that previous budget balancing efforts were even moderately successful at reducing the deficit to within 3% of GDP, with outlays increasing 2.5% for government, 3% for services and in-kind-welfare and 4% for cash welfare. Between 1990 and 2018 revenues grew an average annual rate of 8.0%. If there had not been a decline in revenues a federal budget surplus was predicted as soon as FY 17 and by FY 18 and no later than FY 20 without improved methods of accounting. In the past 10 years between FY 08 and FY 18 revenues grew an average annual rate of 3.2%. Before revenue stagnation began to affect individual income tax receipts in FY 16 and spread to total revenues FY 17 and FY 18, in the five years between the years FY 11 - FY 15 revenues grew an average annual rate of 8.2%. Current tax rates of the TCJA should sustain better than 3% revenue growth, to as high as 8% growth with full employment of the IRS, progressive immigration policy and voluntary 1% UN contribution tax. The payroll tax would increase OASDI revenues 30%; total revenues would increase 7.7% more than 3% to 8%, 10.7% to 15.7%, if the OASDI maximum taxable limit were repealed to tax the rich to end child poverty by 2020 and all poverty by 2030.

 

Composition of Revenues FY 16 - FY 20

(millions)

 

FY 16

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 20

Individual Income Tax

1,546,075

1,587,120

1,660,063

1,687,746

1,790,622

Corporate Income Tax

297,000

297,000

218,000

225,000

265,000

Payroll Tax

Off-budget

836,200

873,600

883,400

941,000

1,002,200

On-budget

304,984

311,168

317,589

332,068

352,569

Subtotal, Payroll Tax

1,147,872

1,190,338

1,209,059

1,284,354

1,369,659

Excise Taxes

95,026

83,823

108,182

108,359

110,526

Other Receipts

Estate and Gift Taxes

21,354

22,768

24,650

16,824

18,042

Customs Duties and Fees

34,838

34,574

40,437

43,852

46,724

Miscellaneous Receipts

Federal Reserve Deposits

91,467

81,287

72,097

55,261

49,267

All Other

40,360

47,665

47,582

50,703

47,178

Total Miscellaneous

131,827

128,952

119,679

105,964

96,445

Total Other

188,019

186,294

184,766

166,640

161,211

Total On-budget Revenues

3,241,185

3,316,134

3,340,712

3,425,373

3,615,868

Total Off-budget payroll tax

-835,400

-873,600

-883,300

-941,000

-988,500

Total On-budget Revenues

2,429,990

2,442,534

2,457,412

2,484,373

2,627,368

Total Off-budget Revenues

957,500

996,600

1,001,100

1,066,300

1,133,200

Total Revenues Revised

3,387,490

3,439,134

3,458,512

3,550,673

3,760,568

Total Off-budget Revenues SSI Tax

1,348,600

1,437,800

Total Revenues SSI Tax

3,832,973

4,065,168

Source: OMB Historical Tables FY 19 Tables 2.1, 2.4 and 2.5; 2018 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old Age Survivor Insurance Trust Fund and Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund; Manfreda, John J. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau Annual Report Fiscal Year 2017. pgs. 93 & 94; US Customs and Border Protection. 2016 Performance and Accountability Report. CBP Collections by Major Processing Port Locations. pg. 170. Duke, Elaine. Acting Secretary. Department of Homeland Security. FY 2017 Agency Financial Report. pg. 47, Federal Reserve Banks Combined Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 and Independent Auditors’ Report. March 8, 2018

4. Before it is possible to begin adding Outlays by Agency Table 4.1 of the Historical Tables: Other Defense – Civil Programs, Other Independent Agencies (On-budget and Off-budget), Allowances, Off-budget Undistributed Offsetting Receipts, and new Infrastructure Initiative row, need to be prohibited by law. International Assistance Programs, that must be added to State Department outlays to be properly represented. These outlay row are fictitious, agency to a sub-agency or another agency, if they exist at all. In normal years, when Allowances aren't abused, these zero-sum errors incur a 2.5% margin of error in OMB Table 4.1 Outlay by agency table. These rows need to be deleted. Department of State and International Assistance rows need to be added together by the State Department, whereas that is how they are reported, and International Assistance Programs row deleted. Overall Table 4.1 is historically about 12% overestimated and must be subjected to a methodical review of Cabinet agency congressional budget justifications to determine exact outlays pursuant to Art. 1 Sec. 8 Clause 1 of the US Constitution. The President's budget cut proposals have resulted in some significant underestimates for some non-defense programs, most significantly in the case of International Assistance programs unrepresented by either State Department or continuing resolution and also because congressional suffrage of zero pay growth attempts to legitimize no growth. The President's unwarranted budget cuts to provide hyper-inflationary outlays for armed services, rather than to balance the budget, constitutes advocacy of the overthrow of the government by force, resulting in increasing deficits, declining revenues and economic growth slowdown. No President's budget has ever been subjected to such significant reconciliation by Congress. The insufficiency of the continuing resolution process and congressional budget rules, has never been so evident. It is unfortunate that the unpopular Congress has lawlessly voted against a raise in their salaries since 2009. Zero growth sets dangerous precedence for the congressional defense against the President's unprecedented budget cuts. In light of the significant reductions in deficit and debt due to the accounting accuracy of this report, the Treasury must choose between financing either the haphazard Congressional resolutions, with an unlawful zero growth policy, inadequately defending against the President's cruel and unusual budget cuts or arrears for normal growth from FY 16. Either option costs less than current OMB total outlay over-estimates or debt ceiling accommodating the President's tall tales. To exact a budget surplus in the future the President and Congress must agree to a 2.5% government, 3% services and 4% cash benefit growth rule from FY 16 while inflation remains 2.5% - 3% to help new workers, raises and promotions sustain 8% individual income tax growth with only 3% economic growth.

 

Government Outlays by Agency Ledger FY 16 – FY 20

(billions)

 

FY 16

CR 17

FY 17

CR 18

FY 18

FY 19 President's Budget

FY 19

FY 20

Total On-budget Outlays

2,772.3

3,020.7

2,868.5

2,909.8

3,006.2

3,148.2

3,071.5

3,186.2

Legislative Branch

4.4

4.7

4.7

4.8

4.8

4.9

4.9

5.0

Judicial Branch

6.8

6.9

6.9

7.0

7.0

7.2

7.2

7.4

Department of Agriculture

134

138

138

142

142

140

145

147

Department of Commerce

9.2

9.3

9.3

9.2

9.2

9.8

9.8

17.6

Department of Defense – Military Programs

565

606

606

612

612

686

627

643

Department of Education

74.0

73.9

73.9

73.9

76.1

67.6

78.2

80.5

Department of Energy

29

30.1

30.1

30.0

30.9

30.6

31.6

32.4

Department of Heath and Human Services

1,002

1,117

1,055

1,156

1,111

1,216

1,142

1,182

Department of Homeland Security

66.3

68.4

68.1

70.7

69.9

74.4

71.8

73.7

Department of Housing and Urban Development

49

56.4

49

46.3

46.3

40.6

43.4

45.5

Department of the Interior

13.4

13.3

13.3

11.7

11.7

11.7

11.7

11.7

Department of Justice

28.9

28.5

28.5

28.4

28.4

28.3

28.3

29.1

Department of Labor

46.5

41.1

41.1

39.6

41.9

37

42.6

43.4

Department of State and International Assistance

55.5

55.9

55.2

40.1

57.4

40.9

58.4

59.7

Department of Transportation

75.1

98.1

77

76.6

79

76.5

80.9

83

Department of the Treasury

540

618

549

484

601

652

598

627

Department of Veteran's Affairs

163.3

176.7

178.7

182.2

184

195.2

195.2

200

Corps of Engineers – Civil Works

4.7

4.6

4.6

4.7

4.7

4.8

4.8

4.9

Environmental Protection Agency

8.1

8.3

8.1

8.0

8.5

6.2

8.7

8.9

Executive Office of the President

0.753

0.761

0.761

0.755

0.755

0.417

0.417

0.427

General Services Administration

0.631

0.253

0.253

0.243

0.243

0.522

0.255

0.261

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

19.3

19.7

19.7

19.5

20.1

19.9

20.7

21.1

National Science Foundation

7.5

7.5

7.7

7.4

7.9

7.5

8.1

8.3

Office of Personnel Management

49.2

50.9

53.6

53.8

53.8

55.2

55.6

58.7

Small Business Administration

0.820

0.832

0.832

0.881

0.881

0.629

0.772

0.791

Social Security Administration (on-budget)

58.9

58.5

61.2

60.0

63.7

62.3

66.2

68.8

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

-240

-273

-272

-260

-267

-328

-270

-274

Total On-budget Outlays

2,772.3

3,020.7

2,868.5

2,909.8

3,006.2

3,148.2

3,071.5

3,186.2

Total Off-budget Outlays (Trustees)

922.3

952.5

952.5

1,003

995.9

1,061.5

1,052.2

1,113.1

Total Outlays

3,694.6

3,973.2

3,821

3,912.8

4,002.1

4,209.7

4,123.7

4,299.3

SSI Tax On-Budget

3,071.5

3,186.2

SSI Tax Off-budget Outlays

1,196.7

1,292.6

SSI Tax Total Outlays

4,123.7

4,299.3

Source: HA. OMB Table 4.1 Outlays by Agency FY 19; 2018 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old Age Survivor Insurance Trust Fund and Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund, 2018 & 2019 working Baby Boomer overestimates redressed 4% FY 18, 4.5% FY 19 and 4.5% FY20 with 3% COLA beginning FY 19

 

5. Undistributed offsetting receipts are agency revenues remaining from the previous year that are used to pay for the following year budget to reduce outlays by the General Fund. Only five agency budget justifications produce reliable undistributed offsetting receipts, the Departments of Defense, Education, Health and Human Services, Interior and Corp of Engineers – Civil Programs. Because there is a final rule for estimating undistributed offsetting receipts, embedded in the most recent agency congressional budget justifications over-ruling the President's budget, OMB on budget estimates are overruled and off-budget undistributed offsetting receipts row deleted. The Department of Agriculture will have the last $1 billion of their rescission of outlays for phenomenal growth in unbracketed loan and utility program levels spent by FY 20. USDA must however discover and return undistributed funds from their SNAP overestimates in the FNS and USDA budget, to get to the root of their duty to pay for 3% annual SNAP growth. Elementary and Secondary Education and Medicaid declare Advance Appropriations in their budget tables, with explanation that these savings are used to pay for the difference between the school year and the fiscal year and to pay for the beginning of the next year medical claims. The federal government needs to pay all the outlays, but the deficit is reduced by the amount of the undistributed offsetting receipts, because the Treasury does not actually have to pay these claims during the fiscal year. The Corp of Engineers – Civil Programs budget vacillates between the sound financial strategy of openly declaring precisely $1 billion in undistributed offsetting receipts and total incompetence, but having once made the declaration, predictably produces $1 billion undistributed offsetting receipts annually as the cornerstone of their federal outlay total. The Departments of Defense and Interior budgets are impaired by the failure to openly declare undistributed offsetting receipts in their budget overview. The Defense Department produces undistributed offsetting receipts with the difference between the levy for total war and the outlays of the three military departments – Air Force, Army and Navy. The Department of Interior turns a tidy profit with $11.7 billion in federal outlays, every year during this Administration and must pay 2.5% growth for public land agencies and 3% growth for Indian Affairs.

 

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts FY 16 – FY 20

(millions)

 

FY 16

CR 17

FY 17

CR 18

FY 18

FY 19 President's Budget

FY 19

FY 20

Total Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (on-budget)

240,442

272,984

271,984

271,562

271,462

347,129

288,751

296,172

Department of Agriculture

14,123

9,666

9,666

2,569

9,004

1,152

1,152

1,000

Department of Defense – Military Programs

93,783

119,691

119,691

106,202

106,202

165,234

106,329

106,383

Department of Education

22,000

22,444

22,444

22,597

22,597

22,597

24,024

24,624

Department of Health and Human Services

106,336

116,583

115,583

125,220

125,220

134,848

134,848

138,893

Department of the Interior

3,200

3,600

3,600

2,800

2,700

3,500

2,600

2,400

Corps of Engineers – Civil Works

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

240,442

272,984

271,984

260,388

266,723

328,331

269,953

274,300

OMB est. Total

241,362

236,880

236,880

245,800

245,800

247,892

247,892

238,596

On-budget

133,851

132,869

132,869

143,776

143,776

147,334

147,334

139,501

Source: USDA FY 17 – FY 19; DOD FY 17 – FY 19; Interior FY 17 – FY 19; Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services FY 19; Army Corp of Engineers FY 18.

 

6. There are two reliable ways to sustain economic growth in a liberal market economy. First, by subsidizing the poor with welfare programs to generate consumer economic growth with a minimum of inflation. Second, by reduction of force, to liberate the economy from armed invasion, as in the Application of the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism and of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (Ukraine v. Russian Federation) No. 2017/11 9 March 2017. The Authority for Employment of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Senior Executive Service under 5USC§3151-3152 must be repealed. The current corruption of the FBI that most warrants disability retirement is drug enforcement under 28CFR§0.85 and Iron Curtain politicization under §0.87. Budget requests for the DEA are cut back every year because they constitute murder for hire between the fentanyl adulteration and drug robbery and are the quintessential federal program that needs to be abolished to legalize marijuana. The Forest Service, Stafford Subsidized Student Loan and ICE are new to the list of federal agencies that are substantially justified. These days, everyone knows it is economically and theologically necessary for the federal government to legalize marijuana and reduce the use of force by abolishing the FBI, DEA and Interagency Drug and Crime Task Force under Art. 1 and Forest Service under Art. 5 of the Slavery Convention of 1927. ICE needs to be abolished under Art. 22 of the Convention on the Protection of Right of All Migrant Workers and their Families (1990). The FDA Center for Tobacco Products and proposed National Institute for Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research need to be terminated under the Nuremberg Code. It is furthermore of vital importance, to reduce the risk of rampage shootings, that [Stafford Direct Student Loans] report their savings, revenues and program level in brackets, Stafford Subsidized Student Loans must be abolished, and under no circumstance should student loan collections be solicited. Excessive compensation of university presidents must be invested in student loans with at least 20% grant component to begin to redress hyperinflation in tuition. The primary concern is that the lethal fentanyl tampering of prescription opiates by the DEA since 2001 has spread to heroin since 2014 and is covered up in federal court by drug robberies with particularly unconstitutional mandatory minimum sentences for the victims in flagrant violation of Blakely v. Washington (2004), 18USC§1512 and Sec. 301 of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act under 21USC§331. Maximize revenues by minimizing murder under 18USC§1111. Disability retirement must fully defend these federal agencies against corruption under 5CFR§351.803, 5USC§3504 and 5USC§8337.

 

Prohibition of Terrorism Finance FY 17 – FY 20

(millions)

 

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 19

FY 20

Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, transfer to Interior

6,076

6,006

5,172

5,000

5,000

Federal Direct Student Loans Program Account Savings, Department of Education

[45,539]

[13,261]

[5,625]

0

0

General fund receipts (mostly student loans)

[-19,493]

[-27,229]

[-14,1901]

0

0

Net, Department of Education

[26,045]

[-13,968]

[-8,566]

0

0

ICE Immigration and Customs Enforcement abolish, Department of Homeland Security

6,230

6,386

7,942

6,546

6,709

DEA Drug Enforcement Administration, abolish

2,091

2,087

2,188

2,139

2,193

FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation abolish

8,996

8,933

8,776

8,776

8,500

Interagency Drug and Crime Task Force abolish

517

514

522

522

535

Subtotal, Department of Justice

11,604

11,534

11,486

11,437

11,228

Foreign Military Finance, abolish

6,312

5,121

5,346

5,000

4,500

Foreign Military Education, abolish

110

100

95

95

90

International Narcotic Control and Law Enforcement, abolish

1,256

892

880

880

850

Subtotal, Department of State

7,678

6,113

6,321

5,975

5,440

National Institute for Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research, NIH, abolish

0

0

95

97

100

Center for Tobacco Products, FDA, abolish

596

600

662

679

696

Subtotal, Department of Health and Human Services

596

600

757

776

796

Total Outlays abolish

26,198

24,723

26,506

24,734

24,173

Source: Congressional Budget Justifications FY 19

 

7. Civil action for damages has been instituted to redress Public and Indian Discrimination (PAID) under 24CFR§1.8 (d, c) and 28CFR§0.47 under Art. 19 of the U Charter.  1. $550 million arrears and $85.7 million current year are due to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and another $500 million to ensure Contributions to International Organizations, including the United Nations, the international government itself, grow 2.5% annually, $1.2 billion FY 19 under Art. 19 of the U.N. Charter. After reviewing only Human Services Related Welfare Programs, CR 18 owes an estimated total of $27 billion arrears FY 18 in an emergency budget supplemental to prevent any continuation of the President's budget cuts and adopt 2.5% growth for government 3% growth for services, food stamps, in-kind welfare and 4% growth for TANF and SSI cash benefits. $11.4 billion of FY 18 arrears are in international assistance, $2.5 billion ACF, $2.2 billion Education, $2.9 billion Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, $67 million Indian Affairs, $43 million Indian Housing, $564 million International Contributions including $550 million for UNESCO, $1 billion for USCIS, State and ACF refugee assistance, $1.5 billion for rental assistance and $4.5 billion unemployment compensation. The United States owes welfare programs an estimated $27.1 billion arrears FY18 after CR 18 and an addition additional $52.5 billion welfare arrears FY 19 if the President's budget cuts are not laboriously overturned. Energy Department cuts must be redressed at 2.5% growth from FY 16. Refinancing the deficit and debt to pay 2.5% government, 3% services and 4% cash benefits arrears from FY 16 settled at the end of FY 18 is the first way for normalized budget levels from FY 16 to reduce the deficit in the beginning of FY 19 under Art. 19 of the UN Charter.

 

Welfare and Energy Arrears FY 18 – FY 19

(millions)

 

FY 17

FY 18

FY 18

FY 18 Arrears

FY 19

FY 19

FY 19 Arrears

FY 20

Administration for Children and Families

54,852

54,359

56,510

2,151

47,528

58,336

10,808

60,099

Education

78,623

78,788

80,981

2,193

72,742

83,197

10,455

85,693

Food Stamp

68,015

67,178

70,056

2,878

69,159

72,158

2,999

74,322

Indian Affairs

2,973

2,974

3,041

67

2,521

3,114

593

3,157

 

International Assistance, State and USDA

29,768

19,513

30,874

11,361

20,269

32,097

11,828

33,056

International Contributions

1,401

1,458

2,022

564

995

1,584

589

1,605

Refugee Assistance, State, Customs and ACF

9,573

8,528

9,594

1,066

9,594

10,320

726

10,628

Rental Assistance

39,513

39,251

40,698

1,447

36,926

40,919

3,993

43,175

Supplemental Security Income

58,536

59,978

60,877

899

58,866

63,313

4,447

65,846

UC Benefits

33,800

30,300

34,800

4,500

29,700

35,800

6,100

36,900

Energy Department

30,086

30,025

30,873

848

30,611

31,631

1,020

32,423

Source: Congressional Budget Justifications FY 19

8. The only exceptions to the FY 16 base year for calculating arrears are the better of FY 11 or FY 16 for UNESCO dues to discrimination against Palestine and FY 14 for SNAP.  Congress has a duty to authorize $1 billion to be paid to UNESCO and the Palestine UNRWA school year at the end of FY 18 + FY 19 program levels estimated at 3% annual growth from the better of FY 11 or FY 16, to be paid in full, forever Palestine. Having initially failed to defend international assistance in CR 18, Congress must adopt a Palestine-as-International Military Finance for Israeli Defense Force massacres of Palestinians and 75 political prisoners sentenced to death in Egypt - goes prohibited for terrorism finance under 18USC§2339C, 2USC§632(b)(8), §633(g) for Congress to pay UNESCO and Palestine $1 billion before the end of FY 18. The UN Relief and Works Agency has served Palestinian refugees since the creation of Israel in 1948. The U.S. has long been the organization's largest donor, but the decision to cut the $600 million budget $300 million leaves a funding gap in UNRWA of more than $273 million for the remainder of the year.  The $1 billion FY 18 year-end settlement leaves Palestine with $364 million + 3% annual growth from the better of FY 11 or FY 16.  The settlement for 4 years of totalitarian famine of SNAP benefit that should grow 3% annually is 5 years of 4% growth in benefit amount to afford 2.7% average consumer price index inflation and 1.3% population growth.  0.3% population growth from 3% annual growth might not be enough and the right rate of food stamp outlay growth might be 3.3% annually to afford 0.6% population growth.  International agricultural assistance must be stabilized from 3% annual growth from FY 16 to shore up interdepartmental cooperation and stop totalitarian pressures on the State Department.  The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World: Building Climate Resiliency for Food Security (2018) by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reports after a prolonged decline, the most recent estimates showed global hunger increased in 2016. In 2017, the number of undernourished people is estimated to have reached 821 million – around one person out of every nine in the world. Although stunting is decreasing 151 million children under five have stunted growth, while the lives of over 50 million children in the world continue to be threatened by wasting. Undernourishment and severe food insecurity appear to be increasing in almost all sub-regions of Africa, as well as in South America, whereas the undernourishment situation is stable in most regions of Asia. The right way to cook stir-fry in a wok with oil, is to serve it on plain rice left-over in a pot with a lid, to prevent morning mush. The Treasury has a duty to pay compensation for the evidence miscarriage of justice detaining a shipment of economic aid for North Korea although economic sanctions may target only military concerns regarding terrorism under 18USC§2339C. In 1996 Soviet agricultural assistance was terminated and 6 million North Koreans starved to death in a totalitarian famine. Congress must repeal 22USC§7204 that entraps the President and Treasury to be impeached for 'economic sanctions' against trade, agriculture and medicine, in contravention to Common Article 1 of the Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Congress owes USAID the lion’s share the end of FY 18 debt settlement, $11.4 billion FY 18 and 3% annual growth from FY 16 thereafter, beginning FY 19 under Art. 19 of the UN Charter.

 

OASDI Trust Funds 2018

(billions)

 

12.4 Tax

Total Revenues

Tax Revenues

GF Reimbursement

Tax on Benefits

Net interest (3%)

Total

Scheduled Benefits

Administrative Costs

R&R Interchange

Net Increase end of year

Assets at end of Yer

Trust fund Ratio

2018

1,001.1

883.4

0

34.6

83.2

1,002.8

991.8

6.2

4.9

-1.7

2,890.1

288

2.37

172.9

168.8

0

1.5

2.6

149.3

146.3

2.8

.2

23.7

95.2

48

10.03

828.2

714.5

0

33.1

80.6

853.6

845.5

3.3

4.7

-25.4

2,794.9

330

2018

1,001.1

883.4

0

34.6

83.2

995.9

984.9

6.2

4.9

5.2

2,897

290

2.37

172.9

168.8

0

1.5

2.6

149.3

146.3

2.8

0.2

23.6

95.1

48

10.03

828.2

714.5

0

33.1

80.6

846.6

838.6

3.3

4.7

-18.4

2,801.9

333

2018

1,001.2

883.4

0

34.6

83.2

995.9

984.9

6.2

4.9

5.3

2,897.1

290

2.1

153.7

149.6

0

1.5

2.6

149.3

146.3

2.8

0.2

4.4

75.9

48

10.3

847.5

733.8

0

33.1

80.6

846.6

838.6

3.3

4.7

0.9

2,821.2

333

Source: 2017 & 2018 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Federal Disability Insurance Trust Funds

 

9. The 2017 and 2018 Annual Reports agree to overestimate OASI outlay growth. Under the Trustees’ intermediate assumptions, Social Security’s total cost is projected to exceed its total income in 2018 for the first time since 1982, and remain higher throughout the projection period, as the result of this 6% overestimation of OASI outlays in 2018. 2018 OASI outlays should be 5% more than 2017 with a 2.0% COLA in 2018, due to 2.4% OASI population growth and 0.6% increase for full retirement benefits of the Baby Boomer generation. Without an actuarial deficit resulting from perennial current year OASI outlay overestimation of 3% COLA, 2.4% OASI population growth and 0.6% full retirement costs, or negative fluctuations in average annual 6.5% growth in payroll tax to afford 6% OASI outlay growth, there will be no actuarial deficit in 2018, 2021, or ever, because revenue growth should exceed outlays in any actuarial projection of the actual surplus. In actuality, there are years when tax revenues might be less than 6.5% more than the year before, or even negative, and this causes an actuarial deficit or account deficit respective of a negative net increase in assets at year end. As long as there is a combined trust fund surplus it should be possible to distribute the costs amongst the program and avoid any account deficits. Methodology and issues to be voted upon, require that the comparative intermediate projections begin with 2017, 2018 redone twice, to account for the OASI outlay overestimate and optimal OASDI tax rate distribution and year thereafter re-done three times, under current law with 2018 OASI overestimate corrected, at the optimal OASDI tax rates and distributing the tax on the rich to three OASDI and SSI trust funds. 6.5% revenue and 5.9% outlay growth projection for 2019 in the 2018 Annual Report, is far more realistic than 10.5% revenue and 8.0% outlay growth estimated in the 2017 report. All years are redone to reflect average optimistic 6.5% payroll tax, 10% tax on benefits, 3.4% interest revenue DI trust fund, 3.0% interest revenue OASI trust fund, to sustain 6.0% OASI, 4.0% DI outlay, 3.0% Administrative and 2.0% R & R Interchange growth from 2018 revised for 5% rather than 6% OASI outlay growth. DI outlays should grow 4% annually to afford a 3% COLA and 1% population growth. At 6.5% OASI outlay growth is slightly overestimated for 2019, it should be 3.0% population growth + 3.0% COLA equal 6.0% OASI benefit outlay growth, this improves the OASI and combined trust fund ratio by 1%. This 1% seems to discredit the 2.1% DI tax rate and make it seem as if the 2.0% DI tax rate should be adopted to spare the OASI deficit, without necessarily reimbursing the DI trust fund $240 billion to sustain a 3% COLA, 1% population and trust fund growth into a future without poverty by 2030, when the DI tax rate is actually 2.1% for the intermediate projection, do not be fooled.

 

Actual Surplus of the Social Security Administration Trust Funds 2017 – 2022

(billions)

 

12.4 Tax

Total Revenues

Tax Revenues

GF Reimb-ursement

Tax on Benefits

Net interest (3%)

Total

Scheduled Benefits

Adminis-trative Costs

R&R Interchange

Net Increase end of year

Assets at end of Year

Trust fund Ratio

2017

996.6

873.6

37.9

85.1

952.5

941.5

6.5

4.5

44.1

2,891.8

299

2.37

171.0

167.1

2.0

1.9

145.8

142.8

2.8

.2

25.1

71.5

32

10.03

825.6

706.5

35.9

83.2

806.7

798.7

3.7

4.3

19.0

2,820.3

347

2018

1,001.1

883.4

0

34.6

83.2

1,002.8

991.8

6.2

4.9

-1.7

2,890.1

288

2.37

172.9

168.8

0

1.5

2.6

149.3

146.3

2.8

.2

23.7

95.2

48

10.03

828.2

714.5

0

33.1

80.6

853.6

845.5

3.3

4.7

-25.4

2,794.9

330

2018

1,001.1

883.4

0

34.6

83.2

995.9

984.9

6.2

4.9

5.2

2,897

290

2.37

172.9

168.8

0

1.5

2.6

149.3

146.3

2.8

0.2

23.6

95.1

48

10.03

828.2

714.5

0

33.1

80.6

846.6

838.6

3.3

4.7

-18.4

2,801.9

333

2018

1,001.2

883.4

0

34.6

83.2

995.9

984.9

6.2

4.9

5.3

2,897.1

290

2.1

153.7

149.6

0

1.5

2.6

149.3

146.3

2.8

0.2

4.4

75.9

48

10.3

847.5

733.8

0

33.1

80.6

846.6

838.6

3.3

4.7

0.9

2,821.2

333

2019

1,061.3

941.0

0

38.2

82.2

1,061.5

1,050.5

6.1

5.0

-0.2

2,889.9

272

1.8

143.2

138.6

0

1.7

3.0

153.0

150.1

2.8

0.1

-9.8

85.3

62

10.6

918.1

802.4

0

36.5

79.2

908.5

900.3

3.3

4.8

9.7

2,804.6

308

2019

1,066.3

941.0

0

38.2

87.1

1,052.2

1,041.1

6.1

5.0

9.1

2,911.1

275

1.8

143.5

138.6

0

1.7

3.2

155.2

152.2

2.8

0.2

-11.7

83.4

61

10.6

922.8

802.4

0

36.5

83.9

897

888.9

3.3

4.8

25.8

2,827.7

312

2019

1,066.3

941.0

0

38.2

87.1

1,052.2

1,041.1

6.1

5.0

14.1

2,911.2

275

2.1

164.3

159.4

0

1.7

3.2

155.2

152.2

2.8

0.2

9.1

85

49

10.3

902.0

781.6

0

36.5

83.9

897

888.9

3.3

4.8

5

2,826.2

315

2019

1,348.6

1,223.3

0

38.2

87.1

1,196.7

1,041.1

11.7

5.0

151.9

3,049

237

2.1

212.1

207.2

0

1.7

3.2

155.2

152.2

2.9

0.2

56.9

132.8

49

8.0

909.6

789.2

0

36.5

83.9

897

888.9

3.4

4.8

12.6

2,833.8

317

2.3

226.9

226.9

0

0

0

144.5

139.1

5.4

0

82.4

82.4

0

2020

1,112.5

988.5

0

42.2

81.8

1,129.2

1,118.0

6.1

5.1

-16.7

2,873.2

256

1.8

148.1

143.5

0

1.8

2.8

157.2

154.2

2.8

0.2

-9.1

76.2

54

10.6

964.4

845.0

0

40.4

79.0

971.9

963.8

3.2

4.9

-7.6

2,797

289

2020

1,133.2

1,002.2

0

43.4

87.6

1,113.1

1,101.6

6.3

5.2

20.1

2,931.2

262

1.8

151.5

145.5

0

3.2

2.8

161.4

158.3

2.9

0.2

-9.9

73.5

52

10.6

981.7

856.7

0

40.2

84.8

951.7

943.3

3.4

5.0

30

2,857.7

297

2020

1,133.2

1,002.2

0

43.4

87.6

1,113.1

1,101.6

6.3

5.2

20.1

2,931.3

262

2.1

175.7

169.7

0

3.2

2.8

161.4

158.3

2.9

0.2

14.3

99.3

53

10.3

957.5

832.5

0

40.2

84.8

951.7

943.3

3.4

5.0

5.8

2,831.8

297

2020

1,437.8

1,303

0

44.4

90.4

1,292.6

1,275.5

11.9

5.2

145.2

3,194.2

236

2.1

226.7

220.7

0

3.2

2.8

161.4

158.3

2.9

0.2

65.3

198.1

82

8.0

965.6

840.6

0

40.2

84.8

951.7

943.3

3.4

5.0

13.9

2,847.7

298

2.3

245.5

241.7

0

1

2.8

179.5

173.9

5.6

0

66

148.4

46

2021

1,167.0

1,039.7

0

46.4

80.9

1,199.9

1,188.3

6.5

5.1

-32.9

2,840.3

239

1.8

155.4

150.9

0

2.0

2.5

163.0

159.7

3.1

0.2

-7.6

68.7

47

10.6

1,011.6

888.8

0

44.5

78.3

1,036.9

1,028.6

3.4

4.9

-25.3

2,771.7

270

2021

1,203.2

1,067.3

0

47.7

88.2

1,170

1,158.2

6.5

5.3

33.2

2,963.7

251

1.8

160.9

154.9

0

3.5

2.5

161.5

158.3

3.0

0.2

-0.6

72.9

46

10.6

1,042.3

912.4

0

44.2

85.7

1,008.5

999.9

3.5

5.1

33.8

2,890.8

283

2021

1,203.3

1,067.4

0

47.7

88.2

1,170

1,158.2

6.5

5.3

33.3

2,964.6

251

2.1

186.8

180.8

0

3.5

2.5

161.5

158.3

3.0

0.2

25.3

124.6

62

10.3

1,016.5

886.6

0

44.2

85.7

1,008.5

999.9

3.5

5.1

8

2,839.8

281

2021

1,530.6

1,387.6

0

49.7

93.3

1,358.4

1,340.8

12.3

5.3

172.2

3,366.4

235

2.1

241

235.0

0

3.5

2.5

161.5

158.3

3.0

0.2

79.5

277.6

123

8.0

1,025.1

895.2

0

44.2

85.7

1,008.5

999.9

3.5

5.1

16.6

2,864.3

282

2.3

264.5

257.4

0

2

5.1

188.4

182.6

5.8

0

76.1

224.5

79

Source: 2018 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old Age Survivor Insurance Trust Fund and Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund. Tax rate / 12.4 = Proportion x Combined payroll tax = Payroll Tax Revenues

 

10. To prevent the unnecessary OASI deficit, that is driving the Actuary to madly declare a premature combined deficit for the intermediate projections, Congress must not wait for the expiration of the 2.37% DI tax rate in 2019 from the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 to adopt a 2.1% DI tax rate beginning in 2018 for the intermediate projection under Sec. 201(b)(1)(T) of the Social Security Act under 42USC§401(b)(1)(T) FY18. By repealing ‘Adjustment of the contribution and benefit base’ tax loophole for the rich and DI tax exemption of Title I State retirement contributors and replacing it with ‘Supplemental Security Income Trust Fund’ Section 230 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§430 it is estimated that SSI benefits would increase in stages, 228% the first year of the tax, 25% the second, 5% the third, and normal 4% growth the fourth, and thereafter, unless legitimate demands to end poverty by 2030 or actuarial differences or market failure require a change in plans. It is estimated that the number of SSI beneficiaries would increase 225% from 8.1 million in 2018 to 18.5 million in 2019 to 23.1 million in 2020 with an average benefit of $589 a month, $7,069 a year, costing $163.2 billion in 2020, when the table above provides $173.9 billion, enough for 24.6 million average benefits. New monthly benefits must cost less than new monthly revenues to sustain an actual surplus. By 2020 individual income tax and customs duty revenue growth from non-discriminatory travel document sales, energy export tax and normal federal spending growth might yield on-budget surplus, by consciously adopting 2.5% government, 3% services, 3.3% food stamp and 4% cash benefit outlay growth rules on federal outlay growth and consumer economic growth is sustained by taxing the rich the full 12.4% OASDI tax on all their income to create an SSI Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2020 and all poverty by 2030. 

 

Sanders, Tony J. Health and Welfare: Fiscal Year 2020. Book 3. Hospitals & Asylums HA-21-9-18 www.title24uscode.org/ha20.pdf