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Customs (CC)

 

To supplement Chapter 5 Columbia Institution for the Deaf §231-250 repealed. To pay arrears of $600 million UNESCO and incidental to the UN Contribution cuts from $1.4 billion FY 17 to $949 million FY 18, of 2.5% annual growth to $1.5 billion in FY 18 and every subsequent year, under Art. 19 of the UN Charter.  To provide 14 weeks of paid Maternity Protection under ILO Convention 183 (2000). To account for $55 billion state department and international assistance congressional budget authority + ~ $33 billion private aid = $55 billion - $88 billion US ODA, 0.28% - 0.46% of GDP > 0.17% OECD estimate FY 18. To commission tax forms to receive voluntary 1-2% of income suggested UN contributions filed quarterly or by April 15. To amend Title 22 Foreign Relations and Intercourse (a-FRaI-d) to Foreign Relations (FR-ee) and Title 6 of the United States Code, Title 6 of the Federal Code of Regulations and the name of the Department of Homeland Security to “Customs”. To change the name of the Court of International Trade of the United States (CoITUS) to Customs Court (CC) and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to Naturalization Service (USNS). To reduce the price of a work visa to a $500 tax withholding under 26USC§1441. To sell state IDs, drivers licenses and passports at equal price to those who are born, naturalized or in some state of naturalization in the United States, and issue special travel documents for stateless persons under common articles 26-29 of the Conventions Relating to the Status of Refugees and Stateless Persons of 1951 and 1954 respectively. To settle claims for compensation with a Palestine Supreme Court relating to Human Rights Council S-21/1 Ensuring respect for international law in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem of July 24, 2014. To abolish all foreign military finance, International Narcotic Control and School of the Americas, and transfer all $6 billion annual treason to fund the UN. To change the name of UN Office of Drugs and Crime (ODC) to Office of Crime (OC). To exempt corticosteroid inhalers from the 2020 ozone export ban under the Montreal Protocol. To sell doxycycline, clindamycin, metronidazole, ampicillin and corticosteroids inhalers in hospitals and by the blind on federal property. To extinguish oceanic heating pumps and forest service fires to reduce arson within special maritime and territorial jurisdiction under 18USC§81 and the Convention on the Prohibition of Military or any other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques (ENMOD) of 1978. To convince Russia and Canada to remove heating pumps polluting the arctic marine environment and weather of the Hudson Bay and Arctic Ocean with new U.S Coast Guard search and rescue ice-breaker under the Polar Code of January 1, 2017. To remove the artificial heating belt in Atlantic and Indian Ocean waters 40°S by magnetic cable and warship or oil tanker to end the drought in East Africa; rain in October. To to protect coral reefs worldwide and the East and Gulf Coasts including the Caribbean against hurricanes by reducing water temperature to <80° F using the Method and System For Hurricane Control US 2002 0008155 of January 24, 2002, US 20080175728 A1 of July 24, 2008 using cooling pumps held by AS Trust & Holding Co. US 20080175728 A1 of July 24, 2008. To place cooling pumps in the West coast to neutralize the dry Santa Anna wind and create clouds to extinguish forest fires in the Northwest with silver iodide missiles pursuant to Rainmaker US Patent 3,429,507 of July 26, 1966. To remove fallen trees from waterways to reduce flood risk. To elect a Secretary and ratify a Statement of the United Nations (SUN).

 

Be it enacted in the House and Senate assembled

 

1st ed. Election Day 4 November 2003, 2nd 20 December 2004. 3rd 20 September 2005, 4th 20 September 2006, 5th 6 August 2007, 6th 31 August 2009, 7th 16 September 2010, 8th 20 September 2011, 9th 20 September 2012, 10th 14 October 2015, 11th 24 July 2016, 12th 30 October 2017

 

1 The Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb was established on February 16, 1857. An Act of Congress, that changed the institution's charter, enabling it to issue college degrees, was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) in 1864 and was codified in Chapter 5 Columbia Institution for the Deaf 24 US Code §231-250. The school for the deaf became the teaching hospital of Howard University Medical School in 1868 when the law was abolished and school renamed Gallaudet University in honor of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (1787-1851), a notable figure in the advancement of deaf education, and is endowed as Education for the Deaf under 20USC§4357. I. King Jordan was elected President of Gallaudet University (1988-2006) amid student protests for a deaf leader in response to the only female President Elizabeth A. Zinser (1988). When the federal government again attempted to appoint a hearing female President another student protest quickly elected deaf male President T. Alan Hurwitz in October 18 2010. The demand for a deaf woman educator to be the next President of Gallaudet University can be heard under the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) of 1979 that states, "the full and complete development of a country, the welfare of the world and the cause of peace require the maximum participation of women on equal terms with men in all fields ". “Recognizing also that discrimination against any person on the basis of disability is a violation of the inherent dignity and worth of the human person” in the first comprehensive human rights treaty of the 21st century, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD) of 2006.  After the 2014 Indian Parliament arbitrarily exiled export pharmacists to rural regions (the gulag) inciting an international conspiracy of misbranded and adulterated pharmaceutical products in Sec. 301 of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act under 21USC§331, Lyme disease was consequentially 20% fatal on one Native American Reservation consequential. Doxycycline is available as doxycycline hyclate from US and Canadian online pharmacies, whose prices are now lower than India. Doxycycline 100 mg, the once a day antibiotic, Clindamycin (Cleocin) for children under 8 and pregnant women, is indicated to treat bubonic plague, Lyme disease, syphilis, acne and hospital acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) + pyromania acquired Streptococcus pyogenes = toxic shock syndrome. Buy American under 24USC§225h - Doxycycline, and clindamycin to treat methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); Metronidazole (Flagyl ER) for gastrointestinal, joint and lower body infections including antibiotic resistant Clostridium difficile, Bactroides fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia lamblia; Ampicillin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Amantadine (Symmetrel) for influenza Type A, Parkinson's and extra-pyramidal side-effect of anti-psychotic drugs. Hospitals worldwide, could sell other drugs, must definitely vend doxycycline, clindamycin, metronidazole, ampicillin and amantadine. Hospitals must solve the common problem of antibiotic resistance, despite the pathological law of perversity that, the least is known about the most common diseases. Corticosteroid inhalers must be uniquely exempted from the Ozone export ban under Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol) to vend worldwide. Vending machines should be placed in hospitals to treat common antibiotic resistant infections for $20 a sealed package. Licensed blind persons shall be authorized to operate vending facilities on any Federal property by the Randolph-Sheppard Vending Stand Act (Pub. L. 74-732) under 34CFR§395.30 et seq. and 20USC§107 et seq.

 

Customs Budget FY15 - FY18

(millions)

 

FY15

FY16

FY17

FY 18 2.5%

FY 18

DHS Outlays

39,775

40,953

40,572

42,400

42,400

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

0

0

-648

DHS FY 18

41,258

41,258

44,063

Total Outlays

39,775

42,457

40,572

41,752

44,064

OMB

42,537

51,769

47,750

42,400

42,400

OMB Customs duties and fees

35,041

36,721

39,537

39,910

39,910

Total Budget Authority

53,507

66,294

66,643

68,290

70,690

Budget Authority by Organization

Office of the Secretary and Undersecretary

773

1,069

1,012

1,037

898

Analysis and Operations

252

265

266

273

252

Office of the Inspector General

142

162

181

186

134

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

12,805

13,254

13,940

14,289

16,388

U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement

6,191

6,154

6,230

6,386

7,942

Transportation and Security Administration

7,377

7,440

7,589

7,779

7,582

U.S. Coast Guard

10,145

10,984

10,322

10,580

10,673

U.S. Secret Service

2,018

2,198

2,156

2,210

2,208

National Protection and Programs Directorate

2,877

3,079

3,045

3,121

3,278

Office of Health Affairs

129

125

0

111

111

Federal Emergency Management Agency

13,054

13,985

14,169

14,523

15,552

FEMA Grant Programs

2,530

2,590

2,371

2,430

0

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service

3,542

3,610

4,018

4,119

4,442

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

258

245

243

249

273

Science and Technology Directorate

1,105

787

759

778

627

Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNTO)

308

347

342

330

330

Congressional Budget Authority

63,506

66,294

66,643

68,290

70,690

Less Mandatory Fees and Trust Funds

12,874

13,084

14,557

14,198

14,198

Gross Discretionary Budget Authority

50,632

53,210

52,246

54,092

56,494

Less Discretionary Offsetting Fees

3,900

4,040

4,966

5,040

5,040

Net Discretionary Budget Authority

46,732

49,170

47,280

49,052

51,545

Less FEMA Disaster Relief – Major Disaster Cap Adjustment

6,438

6,713

6,709

7,300

6,793

Adjusted Net Discretionary Budget Authority

39,775

42,457

40,571

41,752

44,661

Outlays

39,775

40,953

40,572

42,400

42,400

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

0

0

0

-648

0

OMB

42,537

51,769

47,750

44,150

44,150

OMB Estimated Customs duties and fees

35,041

36,721

39,537

39,910

39,910

Source: upper number FY 2015: pgs. 1 & 7 Johnson, Jeh Charles. Department of Homeland Security. Budget-in-brief FY 17 Pgs. 1 & 10; Kelly, John. Department of Homeland Security Budget-in-brief FY 18; Table 2.5 Composition of Other Receipts and Table 4.1 Outlays by Agency OMB Historical Tables FY 17

 

2. On March 1, 2003 the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) inherited the professional workforce, programs and infrastructure of the Coast Guard, Customs Service, Immigration and Naturalization Service, and the Transportation Security Administration, 22 agencies in all. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is the largest arm of Customs after the Coast Guard. In 2010 U.S. Customs, aka Homeland Security, began occupying St. Elizabeth's Hospital under 24USC§225 et seq.  The FY 18 budget is overruled in its entirety by 2.5% growth secured for the historical tables with $648 million un-distributing offsetting receipts at year end with $42.4 billion FY 18. It is outrageous that the undated DHS budget, downloaded in June, would exceed the $42.4 billion the President gave the Department on May 5. Higher scrutiny reveals that excessive 18% outlay growth from $13.9 billion FY 17 to $16.4 billion FY 18 for Customs and Border Protections must be treated as a levy for war against the United States under Art. 3(3) of the US Constitution and 18USC§2381. 2.5% growth from FY 17 levels of spending is $14.3 billion for Customs and Border Protection (CBP) FY 18, 0.9% new hires and 1.6% annual pay raise. Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Program 582 US (2017) held injunctive relief should be no more burdensome to the defendant than necessary to provide complete relief to the plaintiffs in the case, pursuant to Califano v. Yamasaki, 442 U. S. 682, 702 (1979). A court’s role is to provide relief to claimants who have suffered, or will imminently suffer, actual harm in Lewis v. Casey, 518 U. S. 343, 349 (1996). Not to prosecute a person for a no-fault accident in the official course of Lewis v. Clark (2017).  Obstruction of Justice under Rule 96 (Art. 134) of the Manual for Courts-Martial includes wrongfully influencing, intimidating, impeding, or injuring a witness, a person acting on charges under this chapter, an investigating officer, or a party; and by means of bribery, intimidation, misrepresentation, or force or threat of force delaying or preventing communication of information relating to a violation of any criminal statute of the United States to a person authorized by a department, agency, or armed force of the United States to conduct or engage in investigations or prosecutions of such offenses; or endeavoring to do so. e . Maximum punishment. Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 5 years. Furthermore, when he took office, public information regarding improvised explosive devices (IEDs) offended the penalty for explosives under 18USC§844(e) causing destruction of aircraft or aircraft facilities 18USC§32 by downing a brief series of small private planes. There is every reason to impeach under Arts. 2 (4) of the US Constitution and UN Charter. Due to disease or injury, he is believed to be unable to render useful and cost-efficient secret service, is not qualified for reassignment by the President, and therefore entitled to disability retirement under 5USC§8337.  Although the initial impulse was to forgive the oil baron his customs publication terrorists and negotiate with him, despite the Puerto Rican loophole to the otherwise excellent 2017 west-Atlantic oceanic cooling hurricane defense, the translocation of the heating pumps from the Hudson Bay back to the Potomac effluence unlawfully warming an undeclared Northwest Passage, fails to be turned off when not in use, and this means arson within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction under 18USC§81 to the UN headquarters in New York City and Polar Code of January 1, 2017.  Like the former Marine Corp. general Homeland Security Secretary, the oil baron Secretary of State, fulfills all the requirements for impeachment under Art. 2(4) of the US Constitution and UN Charter. Furthermore, for the relief of the White House from supplemental Secret Service budget requests, it seems necessary to explain, when officials quit or are removed from positions of power in the federal government, to prevent bribery, graft and conflict of interest, they are advised that they are not allowed to engage in further federal lobbying activities, such as Chief of Staff, for a period of usually 3 years under 18USC§201 et seq. 

 

 

3. The Department of State is the lead U.S. foreign affairs agency within the Executive Branch and the lead institution for the conduct of American diplomacy. Established by Congress in 1789 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., the Department is the oldest executive agency of the U.S. Government. The State Department and the Foreign Service of the United States that was established under the Act of May 24, 1924 (commonly known as the Rogers Act), the same year the United States Code is believed to have codified Title 22 Foreign Relations and Intercourse (a-FRaI-d) that needs to be amended to Foreign Relations (FR-ee) after the death of the indexer Hon. Edward C. Little on June 24, 1924. Authorization was continued by the Foreign Service Act of 1946. State Department congressional budget authority for ODA is due far more credit than the 0.17% of GDP it has been estimated at by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with only 0.11% of GDP federal outlays for international assistance programs as proof by OMB. Europe based Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation (OECD) has misled the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) to neglect the ODA value of the US Foreign Service totals and the high rates of quasi-private international philanthropy sporadically exhibited by the Arabian emirates and the United States of America. For a number of years UNDP has failed to produce annual statistics that include ODA. The International Court of Justice restored the Historical Tables of OMB to the White House in the spring of 2017. Now that it is fall, and US ODA is accurately balanced, it is time for the Court to call upon the Secretary-General, UNDP and UN Statistical Commission to restore the historical UNDP Human Development tables, with due process of the United States of America and Arabian emirates under Art. 36 (2 & 4) of the Statute of the Court and reconsider ratifiying the civilian democracy created by the Statement of the United Nations (SUN).  The primary finding of this edition of Customs is that total FY 18 State Department, Foreign Operations and Related Programs congressional budget authority + private foreign assistance by internationally recognized US philanthropists = total US ODA. Second, $59.7 billion FY 17 outlays reported in the FY 18 budget request is $3.1 billion more than the $56.6 billion total and $5.4 billion more than the $54.3 billion total error reported in the FY 17 budget request; this unexplained increase may be construed as bribery of witnesses under 18USC§201. Third, the Secretary has not distributed unlawful budget cuts for the United Nations FY 18, and this deprivation of relief benefits under 18USC§246, advocacy to overthrow the government under 18USC§2385 and therefore treason under 18USC§2381 and Art. 3(3) of the US Constitution.  Out of the 24 DAC countries for which private development assistance estimates are available, the United States (US) is the largest source country, contributing US$31 billion – more than the US$27 billion it provided as aid in 2013, spending is estimated to have declined to $30.5 billion FY 16 and to be stagnating at $30 billion FY 17 and FY 18.

 

United States Official Development Assistance Re-estimation FY 15 - FY 18

(millions)

 

FY 15

FY 16

FY 17

FY 17

FY 18

FY 18 2.5%

State Department Outlays

52,124

55,479

 

56,581

59,694

41,135

55,854

State Department Congressional Budget Authority

52,922

56,378

57,493

60,283

42,303

56,698

Private Assistance

31,000

30,500

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

ODA

52,922 – 83,992

56,378 – 86,678

57,493 – 87,493

60,283 - 90,283

42,303 – 72,303

56,698 – 86,698

GDP

18,803,000

18,472,000

19,303,000

19,303,000

19,786,000

19,786,000

ODA % of GDP

0.28% - 0.45%

0.31% - 0.47%

0.30% - 0.45%

0.31% - 0.47%

0.22% - 0.37%

0.29% - 0.44%

Source: Congressional Budget Justification. State Department, Foreign Operations and Related Programs FY 17 & FY18; OMB

 

4. To avoid more poorly interpreted judgments of arrears under the UN Charter, by self-impeaching his FY 18 State Department, Foreign Operations and Related Organizations congressional budget justification, out of deference to the arbitration provided in these untampered accounts, the Secretary of State may instantly agree. (a) To settle perennial 2.5% annual outlay growth to $56.7 billion FY18 from a high of $57.5 billion FY 17 state department and international assistance congressional budget authority. To receive congressional budget authority of $57.5 billion FY 17 and $56.7 billion FY 18 + ~ $33 billion private aid = $57 billion - $90 billion US ODA = 0.28% - 0.46% of GDP > 0.17% OECD estimate FY 18. (b) To print 'Voluntary UN Contribution 1-2% of income suggested donation' on quarterly and April 15 tax forms. (c) To amend Foreign Relations and Intercourse (a-FRaI-d) Title 22 of the U.S. Code to Foreign Relations (FR-ee). To pass judgment the International Court of Justice shall vote: (1) To set FY 18 State Department spending levels at 2.5% growth from a comparison of FY 17 & FY 18 budget justifications, for total congressional budget authority, ranging from a false high of $60.3 billion FY17 to $57.5 billion FY 17 and $56.7 billion FY 18 with due process of certain international security assistance terminations, as undistributed offsetting receipts. (2) To create in the US Treasury a UN Trust Fund for interest income to be derived from the resolution of this dispute and receipt of UN Contributions from other US sources. To dedicate the 'UN Trust Fund to pay cash social security benefits to people world-wide living below the international poverty line ($1.25 a day in 2008) or withdrawal for Sustainable Development Goals of 2030 purposes by UN General Assembly resolution', naming the US. (3) To direct the US Ambassadors to the United Nations to begin to self-determinately account for (a) duplicate annual Contributions to the United Nations and Affiliated Organizations, congressional budget justification table, arbitrarily based upon the calculation of 2.5% annual administrative outlay growth, (b) new UN Trust Fund to earn interest on undistributed US cash payments to the UN and (c) estimate total US ODA = congressional budget authority + private international assistance. To pay UNESCO $47.2 million FY 18 towards $600 million in arrears since payments stopped in 2011. To instruct the US Ambassador to the UN to advocate against the UN Contributions budget cut scheme from $1.4 billion to $948,525 because it is totally unlawful and the distribution is negligently left to the public, who, not to self-incriminate, demand 2.5% annual growth to $1.5 billion in FY 18, to avoid arrears under Art. 19 of the UN Charter.  (4) To adopt the formula for calculating US official development assistance as - total State Department congressional budget authority + private philanthropic assistance = ODA - for the purposes of the non-parentally controlled, unsupervised, encrypted wifi and Apple computers of the UN Statistical Commission and UN Development Program. (5) To impose a (3% = $6 billion in 2015?) up to 6% US-UN tariff on US gas, oil, coal and electricity energy exports to punish the contempts of an oil baron to evade and defeat taxes under 26USC§7201. To keep US coastal areas and weather free of oceanic hydrocarbon heating pumps, whose use is extremely limited to making wind in the direction of oceanic hydrocarbon cooling pumps for hurricane prevention and rainmaking to end drought and forest fires, that must be turned off when not in use fighting arson within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction under 18USC§81. (6) To seize $6 billion in US foreign military finance, international military education, international law enforcement and narcotic control graft, to prohibit all prima facie terrorism finance by the State Department under 18USC§2339C. To distribute the lion's share of reparations for Human Rights Council S-21/1 Ensuring respect for international law in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem of July 24, 2014 to a "Palestine Supreme Court", does it exist in English, Hebrew and/or even Arabic? (6a) To reduce total FY 18 State Department spending, future estimates and ODA by $6 billion. (6b) To appropriate this $6 billion + 2.5% annual growth, for the foundation of the UN Trust Fund. (7) To print 'Voluntary UN Contribution, 1-2% of income suggested donation.' on quarterly and April 15 tax forms. (8) To amend Foreign Relations and Intercourse (a-FRaI-d) Title 22 of the United States Code to Foreign Relations (FR-ee).  The US Ambassador to the UN must redress budget cuts from $1.4 billion to $949 million, that are so unlawful and the distribution is left to the public that, unable to incriminate themselves, instead demand 2.5% annual growth to $1.5 billion in FY 18, to avoid arrears under Art. 19 of the UN Charter. 

 

Contributions to United Nations and Affiliated Agencies FY 15- FY 18

(thousands)

 

FY15

FY 16

FY16

FY 17

FY17

FY18 68%

FY8 2.4%

United Nations Regular Budget

620,379

630,946

630,996

593,191

593,267

403,422

607,505

United Nations War Crimes Tribunal - Yugoslavia

11,077

11,039

11,039

4,130-

4,131

0

0

United Nations War Crimes Tribunal - Rwanda

5,148

5,289

5,289

1,460

1,460

0

0

International Residual Mechanism for the Criminal Tribunals

6,091

2,724

2,724

9,137

7,375

0

0

Food and Agriculture Organizations (FAO)

111,778

108,249

108,452

111,690

109,138

74,214

111,757

International Atomic Energy Agency

102,792

98,068

97,948

101,064

98,087

66,699

100,441

International Civil Aviation Organization

17,532

16,926

17,077

17,089

16,415

11,162

16,809

International Labor Organization

85,724

85,132

85,562

85,551

82,349

55,997

84,325

International Maritime Organization

1,252

1,199

1,068

1,199

990

673

1,014

International Telecommunication Union

10,301

10,076

10,081

10,214

9,854

6,701

10,091

UN Educational, Scientific & Cultural Org (UNESCO)

0

0

0

0

0

47,910

47,910

Universal Postal Union (UPU)

2,323

2,379

2,324

2,366

2,209

1,502

2,262

World Health Organization

113,947

112,704

112,798

113,062

111,211

75,623

113,880

World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)

1,178

1,158

1,143

1,169

1,139

775

1,166

World Meteorological Organization

14,706

14,378

14,445

14,813

14,715

10,006

15,068

Subtotal, United Nations and Affiliated Agencies

1,104,228

1,100,267

1,100,946

1,066,135

1,052,340

754,684

1,112,228

Organization of American States

49,240

49,240

49,240

49,610

50,373

34,254

51,582

Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)

65,686

64,486

64,486

63,286

65,286

44,395

66,853

Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture

16,359

17,157

17,166

17,423

17,435

11,856

17,853

Pan American Institute of Geography and History

324

324

324

324

324

324

324

Subtotal, Inter-American Organizations

131,427

131,207

131,216

130,643

133,418

90,829

136,612

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

74,707

71,066

71,427

70.055

67,855

46,162

69,484

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)

52,928

58,616

57,581

61,734

56,749

38,589

58,111

NATO Parliamentary Assembly

914

901

929

918

892

607

913

The Pacific Community

1,312

1,328

1,312

1,340

1,261

858

1,291

Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

990

949

995

931

956

650

979

Colombo Plan Council on Technical Cooperation (CPCTC)

17

17

17

17

17

17

17

Subtotal, Regional Organizations

130,937

132,877

132,261

134,995

127,730

86,883

130,795

Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons

16,997

18,965

18,291

20,086

19,191

13,050

19,652

World Trade Organization

23,037

22,543

22,601

22,595

21,844

14,854

22,368

Customs Cooperation Council (CCC)

3,708

3,605

3,585

3,641

3,445

2,343

3,528

Hague Conference on Private International Law

272

242

242

247

236

160

242

International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)

1,887

1,736

1,761

1,779

1,669

1,135

1,709

International Bureau for the Publication of Customs Tariffs

143

143

137

143

0

0

0

International Bureau Permanent Court of Arbitration (IBWM)

58

60

60

61

59

40

60

International Bureau of Weights and Measures (IBWM)

1,341

1,227

1,249

1,232

1,191

810

1,220

International Center for the Study of Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property

885

889

916

889

868

590

889

International Coffee Organization

621

618

462

605

411

279

421

International Copper Study Group (ICSG)

28

34

30

30

28

19

29

International Cotton Advisory Committee

313

281

281

276

276

188

283

International Grains Council (IGC)

543

524

484

524

422

287

432

International Hydrographic Organization

107

108

109

108

103

70

106

International Institute for the Unification of Private Law (IIUPL)

140

142

144

142

135

92

138

International Lead and Zinc Study Group

28

29

30

29

27

18

28

International Organization of Legal Metrology (IOLM)

124

126

132

126

107

73

110

International Renewable Energy Agency

3,881

4,505

4,483

4,527

4,348

2,957

4,452

International Seed Testing Association (ISTA)

14

15

10

14

11

8

11

International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO)

288

310

300

310

287

195

294

International Union for the Conservation of Natural Resources

524

520

514

520

506

344

518

International Union for the Protection of Varieties of Plants

287

275

271

275

268

182

274

World Organization for Animal Health (OIE)

174

176

194

176

184

125

188

Subtotal, Other International Organizations

55,400

57,073

56,286

58,335

55,616

37,819

56,952

Tax Reimbursement Agreements

28,220

27,220

27,220

UN Special Political Missions in Afghanistan and Libya

18,015

(18,015)

Total Overall Requirements

1,422,105

1,421,424

1,466,944

1,390,108

1,378,309

948,525

1,462,807

Source: Congressional Budget Justification. State Department, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. FY 17 & FY 18

5. In the absence of any specific demand by the General Assembly, except to levy UN political missions in Afghanistan and Libya financed by the condemned accounting method called Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), the idea to redress patchy unlawful declines in supply in recent years, 2.5% annual growth from the highest year since 2015 is rejected, in favor of 2.5% growth, 2.4% growth in all programs, from this Secretary's FY17, with the remaining funds, $47.2 million in either scenario, going to UNESCO + 2.5% annual growth. The Secretary is particularly firm regarding the abolition of only the International Bureau for the Publication of Customs Tariffs from $143,000 FY 16 to $0 FY 17, zero in both scenarios. In the Case concerning rights of nationals of the United States of America in Morocco, Judgment of August 27th, 1952 : I.C.J. Reports 1952, p. 176, the Court held that the import controls were discriminatory. The Court ruled 6 to 5 against US exemption from taxes, and 6 to 5 on wholesale price taxation at the customs house for which US nationals were due a refund. The guiding principles were economic liberty without any inequality and equality of treatment in commercial matters. The Treaty between the United States and Morocco of September 1836, Article 24, "declared that whatever indulgence, in trade or otherwise, shall be granted to any of the Christian Powers, the citizens of the United States shall be equally entitled to them". To freely negotiate with the current Secretaries of State and Treasury regarding a 'voluntary UN Contribution 1-2% of income suggested donation' and 2.5% annual agency spending growth, there is a rebuttable presumption that it seems fair to allow the oil exporter to prohibit financing for his terrorist, the International Bureau for the Publication of Customs Tariffs, and be permitted to continue to evade the 6% gas, oil, coal and electricity export tax, whereas the hydrocarbon heating pumps have been converted to cooling pumps for hurricane defense, that should be turned off when not in use. After complying with the cooling of the Hudson Bay, by turning off all hydrocarbon heating pumps in North American waters, Trans-Canada can find relief on the basis of pedestrian trail construction for pipelines construction obstructed by terrorism related to pipeline criminal penalties under 49USC§60123. There are thus three liberal scenarios for FY 18 Contributions to the UN and Affiliated Agencies, that are calculated by volunteer and submitted to be voted on by International Court of Justice under Art. 36 (2, 4) of the Statute of the Court – (1) 69% cut homework attempt to evade or defeat tax under 26USC§7201 for which the UN may estimate arrears, even UNDP encrypted Apple computer and wifi accounting costs under the Charter, (2) just 2.5% growth or (3) peacefully structured settlement. Just growth offers voters the option to reduce total federal and State Department spending, and consequentially proposed ODA, by the $6 billion prohibition of terrorism finance under 18USC§2339C. In the third scenario this legal tender would be initially distributed to the UN by forfeiture of the $6 billion + 2.5% annuity to a UN trust fund for cash social security benefits for the world's poorest people or UN Assembly resolution justifying the withdrawal of said Sustainable Development Goals for 2030.

 

State Congressional Budget Authority, Outlays and Subtotals FY 15 - FY 18

(millions)

 

State Department and Foreign Assistance Spending

FY15

FY16

FY 16

FY17

FY 17

FY18

FY 18 2.5%

State Programs

7,963

8,250

11,395

8,685

9,292

8,275

8,852

Embassy Security, Construction and Maintenance

2,324

2,222

2,222

2,357

2,873

1,142

2,468

Other Administration of Foreign Affairs

840

807

820

860

809

499.6

830.9

International Organizations

3,559

3,906

3,907

3,839

3,903

2,193

9,983

Related Programs

170.5

206.3

205.9

207

206

105.7

181.6

Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund

(158.9)

(158.9)

(158.9)

(158.9)

0

(158.9)

(158.9)

International Commissions (Function 300)

123

123

122.7

121

122.5

119

127.4

Broadcasting Board of Governors

744

750

750

773

748

685

792

US Institute of Peace

35

35

35.3

38

35.2

19

36

US Agency for International Development

1,401

1,517

1,527

1,672

1,547

1,412

1,545

Bilateral Economic Assistance

21,111

22,737

23,076

23,833

24,861

16,774

23,272

Development Credit Authority – Subsidy (DCA)

(40)

(40)

(40)

(60)

(40)

(60)

(40)

Independent Agencies

1,333

1,364

1,364

1,360

1,360

1,211

1,454

{Department of Treasury International Affairs Technical Assistance}

24.5

23.5

23.5

23.5

23.5

25.5

26.3

International Security Assistance

7,920

8,840

8,831

8,103

9,224

7,091

1,220

Multilateral Assistance

2,771

2,629

2,627

2,618

2,624

1,481

3,122

Export & Investment Assistance

(599)

(696)

(454)

(694)

(549)

(949)

(645)

U.S. Trade and Development Agency

60

60

60

80.7

59.8

12.1

63

Related International Affairs Accounts

87.4

91.2

91.8

95.3

91.6

90.4

97.7

Department of Agriculture

1,658

1,918

1,918

1,915

1,914

0

1,783

Congressional Budget Authority

52,922

56,374

59,629

57,493

60,283

42,303

56,698

Total Outlays

52,124

55,479

58,976

56,581

59,694

41,135

55,854

Source: Congressional Budget Justification. Department of State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. FY 17 & FY 18.

 

6. It was not possible to verify the accuracy or method of calculation of either Foreign Operations mega-sub-total or State Department and USAID (including 300) total only. The general finding is that State Department, Foreign Operation and Related Organizations congressional budget justifications is extremely long and therefore errors regarding subtotals and addition are almost inevitable, wherefore a 2.4% margin of error is thought to exist. Chronic addition disorder is complicated by the unecessary distinction between enduring and overseas contingency operations (OCO) contributions. To minimize addition errors it is advised that the State Department check subtotal accuracy a final time, to begin the annual congressional budget justification with an abbreviated State Departent, Foreign Operations and Related Organizations Congressional Budget Authority and Outlays by Subtotal. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Administration for Children and Families (ACF) also have extremely long lists, similarly lacking in integrity, because there is no comprehensible total of subtotals, nicely summarized in the beginning of the annual congressional budget justification, that didn't mislead the Secretary to be elected Director of OMB. As a rule of law, the State Department is charged with 2.5% annual growth. Outlays in various programs have however grown at irregular rates, over the period FY 15- FY 18, that require suppression or subsidy according the best estimate of 2.5% growth for this time-period. The underlying grievance setting the stage for the total disputes regarding FY 17 and FY 18 is that the State Department FY 17 budget request International Assistance Function 300 and 150 total is $2 billion low, probably due to an addition error, undetected as the result of chronically undeclared revenue from passports etc. The flagrante delicto is that the new Secretary has dramatically increased spending FY 17 before unlawful FY 18 cuts and oil is far more flammable than ketchup. The total outlays and congressional budget authority estimates at the end of the following table are believed to be accurate. They are roughly $6 billion less because no attempt to appropriate the international security assistance, that must be prohibited, is made, as in the subtotal table before, resulting in the significantly lower $49.9 billion outlays {=International Affairs (Function 150) and International Commissions (Function 300)} and $50.7 billion congressional budget authority FY 18 estimates.

 

State Department, Foreign Operations and Related Budget Detail FY15 - FY18

(millions)

 

State Department and Foreign Assistance Spending

FY15

FY16

FY 16

FY17

FY 17

FY18

FY 18 2.5%

International Affairs (Function 150) and International Commissions (Function 300)

51, 988

54,713

 

55,301

54,268

59,083

40,176

49,853

International Affairs ( Function 150 Account) only

51,865

54,590

55,179

54,147

58,960

40,057

49,726

State Department and USAID (including 300) total only

47,773

50,655

51,117

50,075

54,887

37,611

47,280

Diplomatic Engagement & Related Accounts

{15,815

{16,299

{16,414

{16,889

{17,987

{13,036}

{16,316}

Diplomatic Engagement

{15,035

{15,514

{15,629

{16,073

{17,204

{12,332}

{16,134}

Administration of Foreign Affairs

{11,128

{11,280

{11,395

{11,903

{12,974

{9,916}

{12,151}

State Programs

{7,963}

{8,250}

{11,395

{8,685}

{9,292}

{8,275}

{8,852}

Diplomatic and Consular Programs

{7,907}

{8,184}

{8,285}

{8,672}

{9,226}

{8,260}

{8,837]

Ongoing Operations

4,789

4,789

4,890

4,958

4,906

4,503

5,029

Worldwide Security Protection

3,118

3,395

3,395

3,715

4,320

3,767

3,808

{Capital investment fund}

56.4

66.4

66.4

12.6

66.3

15

15

Embassy Security, Construction and Maintenance

{2,324}

{2,222}

{2,222}

{2,357}

{2,873}

{1,142}

{2,468}

Ongoing Operations

834

798

796

770

820

755

841

Worldwide Security Upgrades

1,491

1,424

1,426

1,587

2,053

388

1,627

Other Administration of Foreign Affairs

{840}

{807}

{820}

{860}

{809}

{499.6}

{830.9}

Conflict Stabilization Operations (CSO)

37.7

0

0

0

0

0

0

Office of the Inspector General

130

139

139

142

142

141

146

Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs

595

591

599

640

590

285

605

Representation Expenses

8.0

8.0

8.0

8.3

8.0

7

8.5

Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.4

30.0

31

31.2

Emergences in the Diplomatic and Consular Services

7.9

7.9

11.9

7.9

7.9

8

8.1

Repatriation Loans Program Account

1.3

1.3

2.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan

30

30

30

30

29.9

26.3

30.8

International Organizations

{3,559}

{3,906}

{3,907}

{3,839}

{3,903}

{2,193}

{3,983}

Contributions to International Organizations (CIO)

1,440

1,446

1,446

1,444

1,444

996

1,463

Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities (CIPA)

2,119

2,461

2,460

2,395

2,459

1,196

2,520

Related Programs

{170.5}

{206.3}

{205.9}

{207}

{206}

{105.7}

{181.6}

The Asia Foundation

17

17

17

17

16.97

0

17.4

National Endowment for Democracy

135

170

170

170

169.7

103.5

145

East-West Center

16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

0

16.7

Trust Funds

0.928

1.3

1.1

1.3

1.3

1.1

1.3

Center for Middle Eastern Western Dialogue

0.106

0.122

0.130

0.122

0.122

0.140

0.128

Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program

0.265

0.4

0.189

0.350

0.399

0.158

0.285

Israeli Arab Scholarship Program

0.024

0.047

0.047

0.047

0.047

0.065

0.048

International Chancery Center

0.513

0.743

0.743

1.32

0.742

0.743

0.743

{Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund}

158.9

158.9

158.9

158.9

0

158.9

158.9

International Commissions (Function 300)

{123}

{123}

{122.7}

{121}

{122.5}

{119}

{127.4}

International Boundary and Water Commission

(IBWC) Salaries and Expenses

44.7

45.3

45.3

45.2

45.2

44.8

47.6

IBWC Construction

29

28.4

28.4

28.4

28.35

27.9

29.1

American Sections

{12.3}

{12.3}

{12.3}

{12.3}

{12.3}

{12.2}

{12.7}

International Joint Commissions

7.5

7.5

7.5

7.5

7.49

7.5

7.7

International Boundary Commission

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.3

2.5

Border Environment Cooperation Commission

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.39

2.4

2.5

{International Fisheries Commissions}

37

37

36.7

37

36.6

33.9

38

Broadcasting Board of Governors

{744}

{750}

{750}

{773}

{748}

{685}

{792}

International Broadcasting Operations

736

745

745

768

743

680

787

Broadcasting Capital Improvements

8

4.5

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.9

{US Institute of Peace}

35

35

35.3

38

35.2

19

36

Foreign Operations

{34,458

{36,405

{36,995

{35,737

{39,090

{27,049}

{31,898}

US Agency for International Development

{1,401}

{1,517}

{1,527}

{1,672}

{1,547}

{1,412}

{1,545}

USAID Operating Expenses (OE)

1,216

1,283

1,293

1,405

1,286

1,182

1,318

USAID Capital Investment Fund (CIF)

130.8

168.3

168.3

200

193

158

158

USAID Inspector General Operating Expenses

54.3

66

66

67.6

68.3

71.5

69.3

Bilateral Economic Assistance

{21,111

{22,737

{23,076

{22,540

{24,861

{16,774}

{23,272}

Global health programs USAID and State

8,458

8,503

8,651

8,577

8,487

6,481

8,792

Global health programs - USAID

(2,788)

(2,834)

(2,981)

(2,907)

(2,828)

(1,506)

(2,980)

Global health programs - State

(5,670)

(5,670)

(5,670)

(5,670)

(5,659)

(4,975)

(5,812)

Development Assistance (DA)

2,507

2,781

2,781

2,960

2,776

0

2,695

International Disaster Assistance (IDA)

1,895

2,794

2,794

1,957

3,409

2,508

2,006

Transition Initiatives

67

67

67

78

117

92

72

Complex Crises Fund (CCF)

50

30

30

30

29.9

0

0

Development Credit Authority – Subsidy (DCA)

(40)

(40)

(40)

(60)

(40)

(60)

(40)

DCA Administrative Expenses

8

8

8.1

10

8.1

9

8.4

Economic Support and Development Fund

4,886

4,302

4,494

6,081

5,329

4,938

5,253

Democracy Fund

131

151

150.5

150

150.2

0

141

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

0

985

985

1,141

1,141

0

1,034

Migration and Refugee Assistance (MRA)

3,059

3,066

3,066

2,799

3,364

2,746

3,219

U.S. Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance (ERMA)

50

50

50

50

49.9

0

51.25

Independent Agencies

{1,333}

{1,364}

{1,364}

{1,360}

{1,360}

{1,211}

{1,454}

Peace Corps

380

410

410

410

409

398

431

Millennium Challenge Corporation

900

901

901

900

899

800

968

Inter-American Foundation

23

23

22.5

22

22.5

4.6

24

US African-Development Foundation

30

30

30

28

29.9

8.4

31.5

{Department of Treasury International Affairs Technical Assistance}

24.5

23.5

23.5

23.5

23.5

25.5

26.3

International Security Assistance

{7,920}

{8,840}

{8,831}

{8,103}

{9,224}

{7,091}

{1,220}

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement (INCLB)

1,292

1,212

1,212

1,138

1,236

892

0

Nonproliferation, antiterrorism, demining and related programs (NADR)

682

885

885

668

1,013

678

733

Peacekeeping Operations (PKO)

474

609

600

475

650

301

487

International Military Education and Training (IMET)

106

108

108

108

108

100

0

Global Security Continengy Fund

0

0

4.7

0

0

0

0

Foreign Military financing

5,366

6,026

6,021

5,714

6,217

5,120

0

Multilateral Assistance

{2,771}

{2,629}

{2,627}

{2,618}

{2,624}

{1,481}

{3,122}

International Organizations and Programs

340

339

337

333

338

0

365

Multilateral Development Banks and Related Funds

{2,327}

{2,290}

{2,291}

{2,303}

{2,286}

{1,480}

{2,424}

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

187

187

187

186

187

0

192

International Development Association (IDA)

1,288

1,197

1,197

1,195

1,195

1,097

1,385

African Development Bank

32

34

34

34

34

32.4

35.7

African Development Fund

176

176

176

214

175

171

185

Asian Development Bank

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

47.4

5.7

Asian Development Fund

105

105

105

105

105

0

108

Inter-American Development Bank

102

102

102

102

102

0

105

Global Environment Facility (GEF)

137

168

168

147

168

102

150

Clean Technology Fund

201

170

171

170

170

0

170

Strategic Climate Fund

63

60

60

60

60

0

0

North American Development Bank

0

10

10

10

9.98

0

10.25

International Fund for Agricultural Development

30

32

31.9

32

31.9

30

33.6

Global Agriculture and Food Security Programs

0

43

43

43

42.9

0

44

{International Monetary Fund}

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Export & Investment Assistance

{599}

{696}

{454}

{694}

{549}

{949}

{645}

Export-Import Bank

(426)

(473)

(279)

(433)

(173)

(652)

(458)

Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPC)

(233)

(283)

(235)

(341)

(436)

(306)

(250)

U.S. Trade and Development Agency

60

60

60

80.7

59.8

12.1

63

Related International Affairs Accounts

{87.4}

{91.2}

{91.8}

{95.3}

{91.6}

{90.4}

{97.7}

International Trade Commission

85.4

88.8

89.4

92.9

89.2

88

95.2

Foreign Claims Settlement Commission

2.0

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.4

2.5

Department of Agriculture

{1,658}

{1,918}

{1,918}

{1,915}

{1,914}

{0}

{1,783}

P.L. 480, Title II

1,466

1,716

1,716

1,713

1,713

0

1,576

McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition

192

202

202

202

201

0

207

Total Outlays

52,124

55,479

55,932

56,581

59,694

41,135

49,853

Congressional Budget Authority

52,922

56,374

56,585

57,493

60,283

42,303

50,697

Source: Congressional Budget Justification. Department of State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. FY 17 & FY 18. FY 16 "Rescission" inadequate to explain ex-post facto changes to FY 16 & FY 17 ~ ($117 million total - USAID OE $7.5 million, International Disaster Assistance $69 million, Economic Support Fund $11.4 million, Global Health Programs USAID $29 million)

 

6. A Special Fund was established by the Assembly in its resolution 1240 (XIII) of 14 October 1958 to provide, inter alia, “systematic and sustained assistance in fields essential to the integrated technical, economic and social development of the less developed countries”. Official Development Assistance (ODA) is a statistic first compiled by the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 1959. The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) was established by the General Assembly in its resolution 2029 (XX) of 22 November 1965. Official Development Assistance (ODA) became a basic pillar of the global community around 1970. High-income countries were called on to become donors to poor countries. The Partners in Development report suggested that the high-income countries donate around 1 percent of their GDP to help the low-income countries to overcome poverty. Of that 1 percent of national income, around two-thirds, specifically 0.7 percent of national income should come through official channels, mainly government-to-government grants and low-interest loans. The remaining 0.3 percent of GDP should come through private contributions, mainly from corporations, foundations, individual philanthropists and charitable organizations. In 1970 the UN General Assembly formally adopted the goal that high-income countries should provide 0.7 percent of their national income to ODA. The Annual Report of the Administrator of the year 2003 marked an important milestone for UNDP. For the first time, total resources exceeded US $3 billion. More than half of these resources are allocated as emergency assistance to people suffering from conflict and disaster.  MDG Goal 8 Clause A.C., calls for “more generous ODA for countries committed to poverty reduction”. ODA has been the most efficient measurement of international economic cooperation. ODA fell out of use during the neo-liberal 1990s, growing only 10.5%, from $52.7 billion to $58.3 billion, over the 12 years till 2002, 0.8% annually. Then, awakened to international responsibility by the global conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, ODA grew rapidly, with the objective of achieving the MDGs, to $69.1 billion in 2003, 18.5% growth, plus $33 billion from the Madrid Conference on the Iraq Reconstruction Fund - $97.13 billion annual total. In 2004, ODA rose to $79.4 billion,14.9% growth, to $107.1 billion in 2005, phenomenal 35% growth. Aid however dropped 5.1 per cent from $106.8 billion in 2005 – a record high – to $103.9 billion in 2006 and went down to $103 billion for 2007. Subsequently, aid has stagnated, the hot air about the Framework Convention on Climate Change doesn’t hold the Law of the Sea. Energy prices and insecurity at the bank cut into donor confidence in 2006 and receipts by developing nations declined to $104.4 billion, 2.5% growth, dropping again in 2007 to $103.5 billion, -0.9% growth. United by the economic crisis and obligated to fulfill the 2015 goal of contributing 0.7% of GDP to ODA as collateral for IMF loans ODA picked up to $119.8 billion, 15.7% growth in 2009. The G-8 called for $154 billion ODA in 2010, 17.1% annual growth, and this growth in ODA seems to be sustainable. Insulated against negative GDP growth by the unfulfilled obligation to contribute 0.7% of GDP aid levels are expected to continue to grow even in a downturn. Commitments need to increase to achieve the estimated $200 billion annual cost of achieving the MDGs by 2015 and 0.7-1% of GDP rate. 

 

26 ODA Donors, Amount and % of GDP, 2003 and 2008

 

Country

ODA

2003

million

ODA

2003

% GDP

ODA

2008

million

ODA

2008

% GDP

Country

ODA

2003

million

ODA

2003

% GDP

ODA

2008

million

ODA

2008

% GDP

Australia

1,465

0.23%

2,954

0.32%

Luxembourg

241

0.88%

415

0.88%

Austria

1,024

0.4%

1,714

0.45%

Netherlands

4,235

1%

6,993

0.88%

Belgium

1,452

0.46%

2,386

0.65%

New Zealand

165

0.17%

348

0.32%

Canada

2,000

0.2%

4,785

0.34%

Norway

2,200

1.2%

3,963

1.1%

Denmark

2,025

1.2%

2,803

0.9%

Portugal

1,028

0.54%

620

0.28%

Finland

655

0.43%

1,166

0.49%

Saudi Arabia

?22?

?0.006?

1,734

0.45%

France

8,475

0.49%

10,908

0.41%

Spain

2,547

0.27%

6,867

0.47%

Germany

7,836

0.33%

13,981

0.43%

Sweden

2,704

1.1%

4,732

1.8%

Greece

464

0.21%

703

0.21%

Switzerland

1,379

0.55%

2,038

0.42%

Ireland

586

0.5%

1,328

0.58%

United Arab Emirates

?5.2?

?0.007?

181

0.08%

Italy

2,484

0.15%

4,861

0.23%

United Kingdom

7,497

0.42%

11,500

0.52%

Japan

8,859

0.22%

9,579

0.19%

USA

19,000

0.19%

26,842

0.19%

Kuwait

?175?

?0.33%?

209

0.18%

Source: DAC

 

7. The full definition of ODA is, “Flows of official financing administered for the promotion of the economic development and welfare of developing countries as the main objective, and which are concessional in character with a grant element of at least 25% (using a fixed 10% rate of discount). By convention, ODA flows comprise contributions of donor government agencies, at all levels, to developing countries (bilateral ODA) and to multilateral institutions. ODA receipts comprise disbursements by bilateral donors and multilateral institutions”. There are three classes of nations. Least developed nations listed on Part I of the List of Aid Recipients. Middle income nations listed on Part II of the List of Recipients. Donor nations responsible for contributing. ODA needs to contain four elements: Undertaken by the government sector. With the promotion of economic development and welfare as the major objective. Directed to benefit least developed countries. Concessional in nature, if a loan must contain a grant element greater than 25%. There are two other categories of international assistance: Official Assistance: Flows which otherwise meet the conditions of eligibility but are directed to nations in Part II of the List of Aid Recipients. Other Official Flows: Transaction by the official sector with countries on the List of Aid Recipients but which do not meet the conditions for eligibility as ODA either because they are not primarily aimed at development, such as military assistance, or they contain a grant element less than 25%. There is therefore no reason that the State Department budget total would not be instantly accepted in its entirety, as ODA. The United States and United Nations have only to make an effort to account for the total amount international assistance provided by private philanthropists. There are two ways of looking at ODA, in real terms of the amount transferred and as a percent of Gross National Income (GNI). In real terms, the United States is the largest donor, contributing $22.74 billion in 2006, but as a percentage of GNI is lagging at 0.16% of GNI. Sweden on the other hand, contributed only $3.97 billion, but this was 1% of GNI. The international aid target for donor nations is 0.7% of GNI. Among developed donor nations Sweden, Luxembourg, Norway, the Netherlands and Denmark are the only the only nations that have met the targets, as of 2006. As a percentage of GNI Kuwait and Saudi Arabia are purported to be the most generous donors. Kuwait, contributes an estimated $4.3 billion, 8.2% of its GNI, and Saudi Arabia $15 billion, 4% of its GNI. The Arabian nations, tend to donate to Islamic nations, and are not members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), nor are they credited for these large contributions by the UN Development Programme and UN aid statistics reflect a significantly lower flow of assistance. It is presumed that a large amount of the assistance provided by the oil emirates goes to the exploitation of natural resources in developing nations and although quite successful in raising the standard of living not considered ODA, because the loans do not contain the 25% grant element, although they are interest-free. The oil emirates definitely need to be included in the DAC OECD statistical database. In 2006 the US is credited with contributing $20 billion, 0.16% of the GNI. Private donors contribute at least another $33 billion (2004), $10 billion more than the government, making this figure closer to 0.6% of the GNI. If private donors would continue match government contributions and these contributions were to be recognized by the UN, the US would be on target to achieve the goal of 0.7% of GNI contributions.  US Census Bureau Table 1263 explains that of a total of $41.9 billion (0.29% of GDP) of international assistance was provided in 2007, $28.9 billion was economic assistance and $13 billion was military assistance. Not all the economic assistance was credited, either, even though it was channeled through official government entities. Estimated at $26.8 billion in 2008 by DAC, US ODA was 25 percent of the global total of +/-$109 billion, but only 0.19 percent of the GNI, 0.18 percent of the $14.8 trillion GDP. Collectively the EU contributes significantly more than the United States is given credit for although the EU’s trillion dollar economy is only larger by billions, in 2008 the EU contributed $78.5 billion, 72% of the total. By adopting the State Department budget, and not accounting for private philanthropy, as ODA, the estimated US share of contributions would increase $15 billion in 2008, from $27 billion to $42 billion, 0.19% to 0.28% of GDP. Total global ODA of $109 billion for 2008 increases $15 billion to $124 billion with $42 billion in US contributions, amounting to 34% of total ODA, not including the Arabian emirates. In 2018 that means, by improving recognition of State Department congressional budget authority as ODA, will improve US ODA estimates from 0.17% to 0.29% of GDP, $56.7 billion FY 18, alone.  Out of the 24 DAC countries for which private development assistance estimates are available, the United States (US) is the largest source country, contributing US$31 billion – more than the US$27 billion it provided as aid in 2013, spending is estimated to have declined to $30.5 billion FY 16 and to be stagnating at $30 billion FY 17 and FY 18.  Including international recognized private international assistance this would bring US ODA to a total of $86.7 billion FY 18.

 

Marine and Terrestrial Protected Areas

 

 

8. The United Nations must extinguish oceanic heating pumps and forest fires to protect the planet against arson within special maritime and territorial jurisdiction under 18USC§81. The Framework Convention on Climate Change doesn't hold the Law of the Sea Treaty, both of which have been rejected by the United States. The Rio Agenda failed to address either maritime heating belt 40°S causing drought in East Africa or slash and burn pyromania of the Amazon, that continue unabated. The Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 uniquely present climate change treaties with an asterisks. Evidence from 2017 seems to indicate that there is better weather to be had rejecting the treaty organization to focus instead on reducing arson risk from pyromania on land and in the sea. The World Customs Union operates under the International Convention on the Prohibition of Military or any other Hostile Use of Environmental Modification Techniques (ENMOD) of 1978. Oceanic heating pumps are the leading cause of global warming and drought due to the vast amount of heat energy that can be stored in water and the only legal use of heating pumps is to generate high pressure winds to blow in the direction of low-pressure cloud producing cooling pumps. Hydrocarbon cooling pumps produced by AS Trust & Holdings US Patent R441A, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, are advertised to Canada, United States and Mexico, to permanently eliminate the scourge of unextinguished hydrocarbon heating pumps from North America waters under the Polar Code of January 1, 2017. The US Coast Guard needs to again detect heating pumps emanating from the Potomac for extinguishment by instruction of Styrene Information and Research Center (SIRC) or AS Trust & Holdings and removed by cable to an oil tanker or warship with a magnet. Canada has removed heating pumps from the Hudson Bay, that is cooling, but the heating pumps in the Atlantic off Nova Scotia have caused Washington D.C. to recidivate, right in front of the UN headquarters in New York. Having extinguished all oceanic hydrocarbon heating pumps and cooling pumps, when not lawfully chilling waters for coral protection, hurricane defense or rainmaking, altering the temperatures of North American waters and air pressure systems, by negotiating for continuous pedestrian trail construction, Trans-Canada can find relief from unsettled public terrorism concerns regarding genocide against Standing Rock Reservation in 2016 obstructing pipeline criminal penalties under 49USC§60123 and the National Trail System Act of 1968 under 16USC§1246(h)(1). The lesson learned is that oceanic heating pumps cause drought, however there are useful applications for cooling pumps such as protecting coral reefs against warming, making clouds for silver iodide cloud seeding and abating hurricanes. The United Nations may coordinate the removal of the artificial heating belt in Atlantic and Indian Ocean waters 40°S by magnetic cable and warship or oil tanker to end the drought in East Africa; rain in October. 

Land and Sea Temperature Anomaly August 2017

9. Forest fires, where they occur, are the major cause of smog, local, regional and polar warming and epidemics of Streptococcus pyogenes. The lesson to be learned in October 2017, after the wild-firefighters have all been cured of a 25% chance of dying from a heart attack in 10 years with a course of antibiotics, is that forest fires are the second leading cause of global warming. The increase in fire activity in the 2017 fire season in the Western United States and Canada and threefold increase in fire activity in southern Europe, that took the lives of 60 people in Portugal, and more than 40 in northern California, are alarming to Mediterranean bushes that burn hot enough to set timber afire with kerosene when slashed and piled. In the United States most acres seem to burned by lightning strikes in inaccessible regions caused by the release of iron dust into the atmosphere from mountaintops, possibly by missile like the silver iodide cloud seeding that should be dispersed during summer storms, and metallic objects, like golf clubs, in slash piles on the ground. Due diligence of National Wildfire Coordination Group (NWCG) data pertaining to fires that are not extinguished within 24 hours has shown that Forest Service (FS) burns public land sixty times more than National Parks Service (NPS). If FS were fully insured by disability retirement to be fired, lightning strikes prohibited and slash piles left chipped and chucked, it is estimated that the NPS with the contract supervision of affected county parks could reduce fire risk on 314 million acres of National Resource Lands more than tenfold from 1.2% in National Forests and average rate of 0.7% FY 17 to <0.07% FY 18. How much wood could a wood chuck, chuck, if a wood chuck could chuck wood?  On Earth, something is always burning. Wildfires are started by lightning or accidentally by people, or intentionally by arsons. In developing countries charcoal manufacturing for urban cooking fires, is a significant controlled cause of industrial timber depletion, involving the use of fire. Backyard burners use controlled fires to manage farmland and pasture and clear natural vegetation for farmland, that must not be emulated on a large scale, involving multiple piles, in forested regions by arson permits for pyromaniac slash and burn forest laboring terrorists, who slash a lot of innocent humans, with the edible trees, shrubs and understory, but rarely set the fires themselves, after once becoming infected with and going untreated with any antibiotic for endocarditis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. Slash piles must be condemned to be chipped roadside and in urban areas and chucked to reduce potential flame height and crowning potential from >8 ft. (3 m) to < 3 feet (1 m). Responsible winter campfires and large animal habitat should be promoted to continue to reduce fire hazard and improve mental health after chucking to reduce, but not entirely eliminate, man-made fire hazard. Fires can generate large amounts of smoke pollution, release greenhouse gases, and unintentionally degrade ecosystems. Global annual burned area estimates approach 350_MHa (869 million acres) per year, and annual pyrogenic CO2 emissions can exceed 50% of fossil fuel combustion emissions. Recently, there has been a surge of extremely destructive fires with corresponding social disruptions and substantial economic costs. Forest fires are one of the most significant sources of CO2 emissions after fossil fuels. Taking into consideration the local and regional fluctuations of air temperatures, near large summer fires and their melting effect on the opposite pole, forest fires are through to be the second leading cause of global warming, after hydrocarbon heating pumps. Regionally, forest fires are the absolute leading cause of triple digit heat. Locally the intensity of forest fires that have crowned and spread like wildfire can exceed 1,000 Cľ or Fľ. Wildfires can be extremely hazardous to life, particularly in Mediterranean climates, if the underbrush is negligently slashed for burning by pyromaniacs, near defenseless populated or urban areas, or inaccessible regions are ignited by iron dust, instead of silver iodide cloud seeding, intentionally causing lighting, often with extensive nails in trees and even golf clubs on slashed land.

 

Mediterranean Climate Shrubbery: Slash Pile Dismantling and Chucking

 

Piled

Chucked

Source: Manzanita killer Oct. 1, 2017. Potential flame height reduction of Mediterranean climate shrubbery from >8 ft. (3 m) to < 5 ft. (1 m). Chuck just enough to remove the slash bag wick drying the kindling for kerosene ignition, to reduce additional fire-hazard to >5 -  < 8 ft. (>1 m - <3 m). $ 1 million saw moratorium, new megaton fine paid Oct. 11 under 18USC§1091. Arson contempts fined $1,000 the kiloton under 24USC§154. Papa bear teaches slash pile dismantling; mama bear and two cubs will crunch. Keep trails unobstructed. Fire the arsons!!!

 

10. Furthermore, to respect the moral and material interests of the author, to end poverty by 2020, or even want to be a taxpayer in 2019 when the duty to file stops and the voluntary UN contributions start, a new Hospitals & Asylums (HA) 7th stage of Democratic-Republican (DR) two-party system development in the United States (US), that is able to make law in its parliamentary majority, is ordered: (a) To amend the federal minimum wage from $7.25 an hour 2009-2017 to '$7.50 in 2018 and 3% more every year thereafter.' under 29USC§206(a)(1)(D). (b) To provide 14 weeks of (unemployment compensation) paid Maternity Protection under ILO Convention 183 (2000). (c) To amend the 1.8% DI tax rate starting January 1, 2019 in Sec. 201(b)(1)(T) of the Social Security Act under 42USC§401(b)(1)(T) to either (c-1) 2.1% DI tax, or (c-2) 2.0% DI tax if OASI pays $240 billion including 2.5% interest in assets for CY09-CY15 to replicate to the extent possible revenue that would have been received if the OASDI tax had been properly adjusted by Public Law 112-96. (d) To replace the Adjustment of the contribution and benefit base under Section 230 of the Social Security Act 42USC§430 with 'There is created in the Treasury a Supplemental Security Income Trust Fund.' (d-1) To tax the rich the full 12.4% Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) Federal Income Contribution Act (FICA) on all their income to pay 16-24 million children growing up poor SSI benefits CY18 and end poverty by 2020. (e) To end benefit attrition with a 3% Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) rule every year inflation continues to run about 2.7% and the Trust Fund Ratio is greater than 20% under Sec. 215(i) of the Social Security Act 42USC§415(i). To make an exception to the rule to pay $777 mo. SSI a 5.7% COLA is needed from CY17, a 2.7% COLA CY18 followed by 3% COLA to $777 SSI CY19 and 3% COLA every year thereafter. (f) To create in the Treasury a UN Trust Fund.

 

Sanders, Tony J. Customs. 11-1/2th Ed. Hospitals & Asylums HA-30-10-17 279 pgs.; .pdf , Word