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Military Diplomacy (MD)

 

To supplement Chapter One Navy Hospitals, Naval Home, Army and other Naval Hospital, and Hospital Relief for Seamen and Others §1-40. To change of the name of the Department of Defense (DoD) to Military Department (MD) on the condition their budget declares undistributed offsetting receipts. 3% annual armed services growth from $612 billion CR 18 to $630 billion FY 19 and $649 billion FY 20. Combined outlays were $543 billion of $612 billion CR 18, for $68.9 billion undistributed offsetting receipts; $574 billion outlays of $630 billion, for only $56 billion undistributed offsetting receipts CR 19. CR 19 is expected to be less than the President's FY 19 request, CR 19 should be exactly 3% more than CR 18. The President’s budget requests have been checked by Congress, although there is propaganda for 5% growth FY 19, by FY 20 military department budgets must limit their spending growth to 3% annually so $583 billion outlays of $649 billion budget request would leave $66 billion undistributed offsetting receipts FY 20. The 2.6% military pay raise propaganda and 1% net employment growth is too high not to distort reserves, promotions and civilian employment. Military payroll is promoted to grow 3% annually = 2% pay raise + 1% net new employment FY 20 and thereafter. Military end-strength increases from 2.8 million FY 16 to 2.9 million FY 17- FY 19 to nearly 3 million FY 20. Since its foundation in 1775 the US military has suffered nearly 1.3 million casualties in 13 wars. In peace-time there are years when there are no work-related deaths in the US military, normally the military death rate in peacetime is 2.2 per 100,000. In the recent wars the risk of death ran from 0.2% to 1%, 220 annual risk to 1,000 after several tours per 100,000. The risk of injury in action was 7% doubling to 16% including non-combatant injuries. To comply with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) the US nuclear arsenal was reduced from 10,000 warheads, to no more than 1,700 to 2,200 nuclear warheads in 2012. Hostile oceanic warming pumps cause drought and intensify hurricanes and natural weather oscillations, and must be cabled out with magnet. Oceanic cooling pumps can prevent hurricanes by reducing water temperature below 80ľ F Patent No. (2002) 0008155 and US Patent No. (2008) 0175728 A1 patented in 2012 by AS Trust & Holdings US Patent R441A by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Rainmaking US Patent No. (1966) 3,429,507 is done by Weather modification by royal rainmaking technology US 20050056705 A1. Texas flooding must be redressed, by digging ditches and waterways, and removing fallen trees, prohibiting the use of snow machines on oil platforms and ships in the Gulf of Mexico as Processes and apparatus for reducing the intensity of tropical cyclones US 9736996 B2 published August 22, 2017 and US 9750202 B2 of September 15, 2017 finding for non-toxic snow machine cloud seeding to extinguish forest fires. FEMA flood insurance may charge counties matching funds. Slash piles must be destroyed to prevent forest fires. Sanctions against civilian objects are unlawful and $27 billion arrears are due FY 18, $11.4 billion international assistance, $550 million UNESCO arrears and $85.7 million dues increasing 3% annually. Marine Corp Physical Fitness Test (PFT) 50-100 push-ups, 50-100 crunches and 3 mile run. 2013 Chapter 1 National Park Service rules must be restored to Title 16 Conservation to create a body of common law with Title 54. 

 

Be it enacted in the House and Senate Assembled

 

1st Ed. 20 August 2004, Memorial and Veteran’s Day until the 6th ed. Memorial Day 28 May 2007, 7th Memorial Day 26 May 2008, 8th 25 May 2009, 9th National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day 7 December 2009, 10th National Defense Transportation Day 20 May 2011, 11th 1 May 2012, 12th 5 May 2015, 13th Memorial Day 30 May 2016, 14th Armed Forces Day 20 May 2017, 15th Veteran’s Day 11 November 2018

 

1.This Act supplements the contents of Title 24 Chapter One Navy Hospitals, Naval Home, Army and other Naval Hospital, and Hospital Relief for Seamen and Others §1-40.  The United States has the best-trained, most effective military in the world. The military is an all-volunteer force of dedicated, patriotic men and women who reflect the best values and spirit of our Nation. The Army, Navy, and Marine Corps were established in 1775, in concurrence with the American Revolution. On June 30, 1775, the Second Continental Congress established 69 Articles of War to govern the conduct of the Continental Army.  The War Department was established in 1789, and was the precursor to what is now the Department of Defense.  On April 10, 1806, the first United States Congress enacted 101 Articles of War, which were not significantly revised until over a century later.  The Department of Defense (DoD) was named in the Secretary of Defense Transfer Order No. 40 of July 22, 1949.  Since the creation of America’s first army in 1775, the Department has evolved into one of the largest organizations in the world. It executes a budget more than twice that of the world’s largest corporation, has more personnel than the populations of a third of the world’s countries, provides medical care for as many patients as the largest health management organization and maintains 24 million acres of land.  The “pre-decisional” defense budget request increased from $582 billion to $606 billion FY 17 and then to $639 billion FY 18 and to $686 billion FY 19. CR 18 limited total defense increase to 1% to $611.8 billion FY 18 including a $4.7 billion Emergency Supplemental for a new Missile Defense system. CR 18 exhausted all legitimate claims for defense department spending growth potential in excess of 3% annually. The President's hyper-inflationary 12% FY 19 total war fund growth request is certain to be rejected.  Departmental outlay growth must slow to 3% annually FY 20 – 2% pay-raise, 1% net new employment – afforded by continuing resolutions projected to pay no more or less than 3% annual growth from $611.8 billion CR 18. 

 

Military Programs Budget FY16 - FY20

(millions)

 

FY 16

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 20

Air Force

163,075

168,939

183,600

194,200

200,000

Army

148,000

166,700

177,900

186,500

192,200

Navy

160,512

174,260

181,432

193,632

190,713

Total

471,587

509,899

542,932

574,332

582,913

Federal Outlays

-565,370

-606,000

-611,800

-630,154

-649,059

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

-93,783

-96,101

-68,868

-55,822

-66,146

Source: Pre-decisional Department of Defense FY 18 Budget Request May 2017; Horlander, Thomas A. Major General. Director, Army Budget. Army FY 2017 Budget Overview. February 2016; Highlight of the Department of the Navy FY 2017 Budget; Martin, James F. Jr. Major General United States Air Force. Deputy Assistant Secretary. United States Air Force Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Overview. February 2016, Maj. General Pletcher; Wilson, Heather A. Secretary of Air Force. United States Air Force FY 19 Budget Overview. 12 February 2018. Chamberlain, Paul A. Major General; Army Budget Director; Welch, Davis S. Deputy Director. Army FY 2019 Budget Overview. February 2018, Highlights of the Department of the Navy FY 2019 Budget. Office of Budget. 2018

 

2. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued guidance on a “Comprehensive Plan for Reforming the Federal Government and Reducing the Federal Civilian Workforce.” Reform efforts should focus on improving organizational effectiveness; eliminating, restructuring, or merging activities; and workforce management. Congressional support is required to eliminate barriers associated with the account availability for certain annual appropriations, modify reprogramming thresholds, initiate new starts, and improve contracting processes through continuing resolutions. The Department is overzealously responding to the defense drawdown, which began with the FY 2010 budget, was the fifth major defense drawdown since the end of World War II (WWII), following those after WWII and the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Cold War. While this decline largely reflects a significant drawdown of U.S. presence in Iraq and Afghanistan, it occurred in a period of considerable instability and was driven to a substantial extent by the restrictions of the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011 rather than by strategic considerations. Since the NPT goals of 2012 there has been little to justify further spending reductions or increases in excess of 3% annually. Beginning with the Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 budget, the Defense Department began implementing $487 billion, 10-year cut in spending consistent with $500 billion annual federal spending caps instituted by the Budget Control Act of 2011. After saving a considerable sum of money complying with Nuclear Non-Proliferation (NPT) warhead decommissioning goals in 2012 the FY 2015 DoD budget request was able to reduce military spending. The FY 2015 DoD budget request could not accept sequestration levels and the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 funded the Department at about $116 billion more than projected sequestration levels over the 5-year period. The Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Defense Department budget submission complies with the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 and sustains the alignment of program priorities and resources with the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) and supports military operations in Afghanistan and other areas of the world to counter threats from terrorists. The President must agree that $611,800 million from CR 18 exhausted all legitimate claims for total Defense spending growth in excess of 3% annually therefrom. Although FY 19 military department budgets exhibit unsustainably high rates of catch-up growth by FY 20 department spending growth must be limited to 3% annually to sustain a profit margin of undistributed offsetting receipts, moderating demand for the production of unexploded ordinance.

 

US Military End Strength FY16 - FY20

 

Active Duty

FY16

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 20

Army

475,400

476,245

483,500

487,500

492,375

Navy

327,300

323,944

327,900

335,400

338,754

Marine Corps

182,000

185,514

185,000

186,100

188,387

Air Force

317,000

322,800

325,100

329,100

332,400

Sub-Total, Active Duty

1,301,700

1,308,503

1,321,500

1,338,100

1,351,916

Air Force Reserve

68,800

69,800

70,000

70,700

Army Reserve

198,463

198,000

194,318

199,500

201,495

Navy Reserve

57,400

57,824

59,000

59,100

59,691

Marine Corps Reserve

38,900

38,682

38,500

38,500

38,885

Army National Guard

342,000

343,603

343,500

343,500

346,935

Air National Guard

105,500

105,700

106,600

107,100

108,070

Sub-Total, Reserve

742,263

812,609

811,718

817,700

825,776

Civilian

Army

201,700

203,500

205,400

207,249

209,114

Navy

181,500

185,758

187,900

190,642

192,548

Marine Corps

20,200

20,469

21,108

21,533

21,748

Air Force

171,000

172,500

143,500

142,600

144,026

Defense-Wide

195,400

197,200

199,172

201,164

203,175

Civilian FTEs

769,800

750,927

757,080

763,188

770,611

Total End-Strength

2,813,763

2,872,039

2,890,298

2,918,988

2,948,303

Source: FY 17 DoD Budget Request End-Strength Table crunched. Pre-decisional Department of Defense FY 18 Budget (PB) Request May 2017; Maj. General Pletcher; Wilson, Heather A. Secretary of Air Force. United States Air Force FY 19 Budget Overview. 12 February 2018.

 

3. Total US Military end-strength increases from 2.8 million FY 16 to 2.9 million FY 17- FY 19 to nearly 3 million FY 20. Reserve and Civilian workforces support active duty soldiers. The FY 19 Air Force request is for end strength to 506k, 3% more than 492k requested FY 17 and 1.2% more than 500k FY 18. 539k FY 06 is the war time high, down to 490k FY 09 before excessive growth FY 10 resulted in cuts to 483k FY 15. 1% annual net employment growth is the norm. The military pay raise is 2.4% FY 18 and 2.6% FY 19 while the civilian pay raise was 1.9% FY 18 and 0% FY 19. While military employment is growing normally, at 1% annually, civilian employment is declining by 1,000, -0.7% FY 18 – FY 19. The FY 19 Army budget compensates 1,030,500 end strength, including adjustments for pay, subsistence, housing allowances; continues to address retirement compensation. The budget increases funding for Reserve Component Soldiers on active duty supporting missions under 10USC§12304b. Navy FY 19 active duty manning at 335,400, up from 322,900 FY 17 with more than 100 ships deployed overseas on any given day. The budgeted end strength in FY 2019 is 7,500 higher than the estimated end strength for FY 2018. Total Navy and Marine Corp employment increases from 812k FY 17 to 831k FY 18. Navy FY 19 active duty manning at 335,400, was up from 322,900 FY 17 with more than 100 ships deployed overseas on any given day. The budgeted Navy end strength in FY 19 is 7,500 higher than the estimated end strength for FY 2018. In peacetime the US military usually has a work-related fatality rate of 2.2 per 100,000. Less than the 3 per 100,000 average. President Obama won the Nobel Peace Prize and in peacetime under his administration there were years when there was not a single work-related fatality in the 2.8 million end strength of the US military reported by Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA). Of the 1.5 million who served in the Global War on Terrorism, 0.2% - 1% of combat soldiers died at the estimated average age of 24 rather than the national age of 78. That constitutes a work-related fatality rate of 200 per 100,000, double the risk of logging, the most dangerous civilian career with fatalities exceeding 100 per 100,000. It can be estimated that the life expectancy of people fighting in these wars can be estimated at 70 due to sudden death although soldiers who survive the war theatre tend to live full and healthy lives. Global War on Terror returnees are using medical services and applying for disability at higher rates than in previous conflicts. For every service member killed in action as of October 21, 2013 (7,092) there are seven wounded in action (51,670). When including “noncombat” injuries (56,874), the ratio of injured to killed jumps to 16 to 1. One out of four veterans of the current conflicts has filed a disability claim at the VHA, and the VA has treated 30% of veterans of the two wars as of October 2011.  A war is defined as a conflict in which more than 1,000 people died.

 

Air Force Budget FY16 - FY20

(millions)

 

FY16

FY17

FY18

FY 19

FY 20

Total Air Force

163,075

168,939

183,600

194,200

200,000

Operation & Maintenance

13,900

15,600

16,068

Military Construction

2,400

2,200

2,266

Procurement

24,800

25,700

26,471

Research, Development, Test & Evaluation

25,600

30,400

31,312

Military Personnel

30,700

32,400

33,372

Overseas Contingency Operation

49,200

49,900

51,397

Pass Through

37,100

37,900

39,114

Budget Request

183,700

194,100

200,000

Source: Martin, James F. Jr. Major General United States Air Force. Deputy Assistant Secretary. United States Air Force Fiscal Year 2017 Budget Overview. February 2016; Maj. General Pletcher; Wilson, Heather A. Secretary of Air Force. United States Air Force FY 19 Budget Overview. 12 February 2018

 

4. The mission of the Air Force is to provide combat-credible forces needed to deter war and protect the national security. The FY 19 Air Force budget increases total end strength by 4,700 and supports a 2.6% pay raise to maintain competitive compensation profile to revitalize squadrons. FY 16 – FY 17 total spending increased 3.6% from $163 billion FY 16 to $169 billion FY 17, 8.7% to $183.6 billion FY 18 and 5.8% to $194.2 billion FY 19. The FY 19 request is for end strength to 506k, 3% more than 492k requested FY 17 and 1.2% more than 500k FY 18. 539k FY 06 is the war time high, down to 490k FY 09 before excessive growth FY 10 resulted in cuts to 483k FY 15. 1% annual net employment growth is the norm. The military pay raise is 2.4% FY 18 and 2.6% FY 19 while the civilian pay raise was 1.9% FY 18 and 0% FY 19. While military employment is growing normally, at 1% annually, civilian employment is declining by 1,000, -0.7% FY 18 – FY 19. Overseas Contingency Operations support deployed personnel. There is -8.3% decline in outlays for military construction, BRAC and military family housing from $2.4 billion FY 18 to $2.2 billion FY 19, yet the agenda seems vigorous and next BRAC round is in FY 20. The FY 18 and FY 19 Air Force budget has ceased to express major spending categories of blue and non-blue TOA, and reserves as civilian employees, and now even reports pass-through funds. To sustain 3% annual armed service spending growth the Department must moderate 8.7% growth FY 18 and 5.8% FY 19 to 3% FY 20 exactly $200 billion for the Air Force, and 3% every year thereafter.  Major procurement quantities for the Air Force account for aircraft (119 FY16, 102 FY17, 84 FY 18 and 100 FY 19), space (5 FY16, 3 FY17, 3 FY 18 and 5 FY 19) and weapons (31,600 FY16, 37,610 FY17, 39,136 FY 18 and 48,512 FY 19). The Procurement portfolio delivers both immediate and future capabilities through investment across five specific appropriations: Aircraft, Missile, Space, Ammunition, and Other Procurement. The Air Force balanced modernization with recapitalization efforts to invest in future capabilities needed for a high-end fight. The FY 19 budget request increases procurement ramps and production quantities of 48 F-35A, 15 KC-46A, 1 HC-130J, 6 C-130J, 10 Combat Rescue Helicopters (CRH). FY 19, the Air Force will procure 256 AIM-9X Sidewinder Air-to-Air missiles, 220 (2 OCO) AIM-120D Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAM), 312 (48 OCO) Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile- Extended Range (JASSM-ER) missiles, 7,899 JDAM (28,101 OCO), 1,338 (3,000 OCO) Hellfire missiles, and 3,427 (3,909 OCO) Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) II to sustain the Air Force’s air dominance and global precision attack capabilities.

 

Total Army Spending FY17 - FY20

(billions)

 

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

166.7

177.9

186.5

192.2

OCO

28.0

29.6

33.7

34.7

Base

138.7

148.3

152.8

157.5

Military Personnel

58.0

60.6

62.4

64.3

Operation and Maintenance

49.5

52.5

54.1

55.7

Procurement

28.0

32.0

33.0

34.0

Military Construction/Family Housing

2.3

2.0

2.1

2.2

Other Base

0.9

1.2

1.2

1.3

Source: Horlander, Thomas A. Major General. Director, Army Budget. Army FY 2017 Budget Overview. February 2016. pg. 4; Chamberlain, Paul A. Major General; Army Budget Director; Welch, Davis S. Deputy Director. Army FY 2019 Budget Overview. February 2018

 

5. The FY 19 budget supports a total Army end strength of 1,030,500 soldiers. The Army’s top-line base funding grew by 7% from the total FY18 budget request, Military Personnel 4.5%, Operations & Maintenance 6.1%, Procurement/RDTE (RDA) 14.3% military construction declines -13% after a 44% increase FY 18 while other base spending remained zero after 33% growth FY 18. $14.5 billion, 28%, of $52.5 billion FY 19 outlays for operations and maintenance go to civilian pay. The plan to reduce regular army employment to 450k FY 18 has been overruled. Now the budget provides for between 5.8% growth to 476 k FY 18 and 7.4% growth to 483.5k FY 18 authorized by the FY 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, Public Law No: 115-91. The FY 19 request is for 487.5k regular army, 8.3% growth in end-strength in two years since FY 17, 4.2% average annual growth. FY 20 and thereafter, all Army units Regular, Guard and Reserve are expected to sustain 1% average annual growth. The basic pay raise is 2.6%, the Basic Allowance for Housing 2.9% and Basic Allowance for Subsistence 3.4%.  The combined FY 19 Procurement and RDTE budget is $26.5 billion FY 17, 5.2% growth to $27.9 billion FY 18 and 15% to $32.1 billion FY 19. Excessive growth must moderate at 3% to $33 billion Procurement and RDTE FY 20 or cuts will be warranted. The FY 19 Research Development, Test and Evaluation (RDTE) request is for $8.6 billion FY 17, 9% growth to $9.4 billion FY 18 and 8.5% growth to $10.2 billion FY 19. The FY 19 Procurement request is for $17.9 billion FY 17, 1% more than FY 16, 4% growth to $18.6 billion FY 18 and unacceptably high 17.7% growth to $21.9 billion. The Army requested $15.1 billion for procurement FY 17, a reduction of -8% from FY 2016, yet 2.4% annual growth from $14.1 billion FY 2014. The FY 19 budget sustains procurement of Apache, Blackhawk and Chinook aircraft remanufacture and new builds. Accelerates Multiple Launch Rocket Systems (MLRS) launcher modernization and maximizes procurement of key munitions Patriot Missile Segment Enhancement (MSE) missiles, Guided MLRS rockets, and Army Tactical Missile Systems (ATACMS). Accelerates modernization of Abrams, Bradley and Stryker fleets with mobility and lethality upgrades. Sustains procurement of Paladin Integrated Management (PIM) and Joint Light Tactical Vehicle for Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP). Increases procurement of Joint Battle Command – Platform (JBC-P), baselining the force of the mounted mission command.

 

Navy and Marine Corps Budget FY15 - FY20

(millions)

 

FY15

FY16

FY17

FY 17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 20

Military Personnel, Navy

27,380

27,704

27,952

27,999

28,918

30,426

31,339

Military Personnel, Marines

12,741

12,818

12,813

12,723

13,279

13,891

14,308

Reserve Personnel, Navy

1,873

1,867

1,924

1,924

2,000

2,068

2,130

Reserve Personnel, Marine Corp

691

702

745

744

767

788

812

Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Fund Contribution, Navy

1,313

1,281

1,241

1,352

1,514

1,466

1,433

Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Fund Contribution, MC

748

726

703

766

866

831

835

Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Fund Contribution, Res Navy

125

116

112

123

136

131

135

Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Fund Contribution, Res MC

74

68

65

72

77

74

76

Operations and Maintenance, Navy

38,000

38,946

39,484

38,221

46,381

41,435

42,678

Operations and Maintenance, Marine Corps

5,627

5,677

5,954

5,941

6,951

6,826

7,031

Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve

1,000

957

928

918

1,087

1,027

1,058

Operations and Maintenance, Marine Corp Reserve

270

274

271

270

279

272

280

Environmental Restoration, Navy

0

300

282

0

281

329

339

Aircraft Procurement, Navy

14,755

17,719

14,109

16,111

14,956

19,042

17,077

Weapons Procurement, Navy

3,173

3,050

3,209

3,293

3,420

3,702

3,813

Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy

15,995

18,705

18,355

21,157

20,404

21,871

22,527

Ship Modernization and Sustainment

294

0

0

0

0

0

0

Other Procurement, Navy

6,281

6,484

6,339

6,401

7,929

9,414

8,405

Procurement, Marine Corps

893

1,187

1,363

1,307

2,065

2,858

2,189

Procurement of Ammunition, Navy/Marine Corps

674

652

664

637

792

1,006

816

Research Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy

16,030

18,111

17,276

17,525

17,710

18,451

19,005

Military Construction, Navy and Marine Corps

1,084

1,704

1,028

1,344

1,818

2,543

1,927

Military Construction, Naval Reserve

56

36

39

39

65

43

44

Family Housing, Navy (Construction)

16

17

94

96

84

105

99

Family Housing, Navy (Operations)

345

353

301

306

328

315

325

National Defense Sealift Fund

508

474

0

581

509

0

500

Base Realignment & Closure

225

170

134

176

144

152

157

Subtotal

150,171

160,098

155,385

160,026

172,760

179,066

179,338

Navy Total

127,822

136,900

132,018

136,859

146,658

150,983

151,590

Marine Corps Total

22,349

23,197

23,366

23,370

26,331

27,644

27,748

Overseas Contingency Operations

10,341

9,273

9,476

14,031

8,662

15,005

11,375

Total

160,512

169,370

164,860

174,260

181,432

193,632

190,713

Source: Highlight of the Department of the Navy FY 2017 Budget Pg. 1-11; Highlights of the Department of the Navy FY 2019 Budget. Office of Budget. 2018. Pg. Pg. 1-8

 

6. For more than two centuries, the Navy and Marine Corps have operated throughout the world to protect American citizens and defend U.S. interests by responding to crises and, when necessary, fighting and winning wars. Naval forces use the global maritime commons as a medium of maneuver, assuring access to overseas regions, defending key interests in those areas, protecting U.S. citizens abroad, and preventing adversaries from leveraging the world’s oceans against the United States. Total Obligation Authority (TOA) for the FY 2019 DON baseline budget is $179.1 billion. The need for stable and predictable funding remains. To meet the objectives in the National Security Strategy, as part of the Joint Forces, the Navy and Marine Corps primary force contributors are two Carrier Strike Groups (CSG) and two Amphibious Ready Groups (ARG) forward at all times, and keeping three additional CSGs and ARGs in a ready use or surge status (2+3) to deploy within 30 days. The average ship count FY 18 is 280 ships with 100 deployed, FY 19 299 ships with 100 deployed and FY 23 with 326 ships with 131 deployed. The Navy employs 117 ships in the North Atlantic, 1 ship in the South Atlantic, 6 ships in the South Pacific, 52 ships in the North Pacific, 24 ships in the Indian Ocean and 17 ships in Western Europe. In FY 2019, deployable battle force is 299 ships. The FY 2019 budget request procures ten battle force ships and 120 manned and unmanned aircraft. The active Navy has increased 2.3% from 327,900 in FY 2018 to 335,400 in FY 2019. The active Marine Corps is growing 0.6% from 185,000 in FY 2018 to a level of 186,100 in FY 2019. Civilian personnel levels grow to accommodate. The FY 19 Navy budget request $194.1 billion, an increase of $12.6 billion (7% from the FY 2018 budget request (Base and OCO). Marine Corps Force 2025 initiatives are without increased end strength and OCO growth is anemic. 

 

Coast Guard Budget FY15 - FY20

(thousands)

 

FY15

FY16

FY 17

FY17

FY 18

FY 19

FY 20

Operating Expenses

6,844,406

6,901,488

6,986,815

6,916,936

7,213,454

7,792,498

8,026,273

Procurement, Construction and Improvements

1,230,008

1,945,169

1,136,788

1,370,007

1,203,745

1,886,750

1,943,353

Research Development

17,892

18,019

18,319

36,319

18,641

19,109

19,682

Reserve Training

114,572

110,614

112,302

112,302

114,875

0

121,768

Environmental Compliance and Restoration

13,197

13,221

13,315

13,315

13,397

0

14,201

Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Fund Contribution (MERHCFC)

176,970

168,847

160,899

175,506

195,764

0

201,637

Sub-total Discretionary Funding

8,397,045

9,157,358

8,428,438

8,624,385

8,759,876

9,698,357

10,326,914

Retired Pay

1,450,625

1,604,000

1,666,940

1,666,940

1,690,824

1,734,844

1,786889

Boat Safety

112,830

114,326

116,088

113,049

118,416

114,682

118,123

Maritime Oil Spill Program

152,256

107,329

107,668

101,000

101,000

101,000

101,000

Gift Fund

1,703

1,621

2,214

2,829

2,864

2,864

2,864

Sub-Total Mandatory Funding

1,717,414

1,827,276

1,892,910

1,883,818

1,913,104

1,953,390

2,008,876

OSLTF Contribution

(45,000)

(45,000)

(45,000)

(45,000)

(45,000)

(45,000)

(45,000)

Overseas Contingency Operation

213,000

160,002

0

162,692

0

0

0

Rescission of Un-obligated Balances

(66,723)

(32,365)

0

0

0

0

0

Sub-total (Transfer and Supplementals

146,277

127,617

0

0

0

0

0

Total Budget Authority

10,290,747

11,112,251

10,321,348

10,508,203

10,672,980

11,651,747

12,335,790

Source: Zukunft, Paul F. Admiral. Commandant of the Coast Guard. United States Coast Guard FY 2017 Budget-in-Brief. 2016; Zukunft, Paul F. Admiral. Commandant of the Coast Guard. United States Coast Guard FY 2019 Posture Statement, 2019 Budget Overview and 2017 Performance Highlights. 2018

 

7. The Coast Guard budget is not financed by the military, it is the responsibility of the Department of Homeland Security. The Coast Guard is a military service and branch of the U.S. Armed Forces, a federal law enforcement agency, a regulatory body, a first responder, and a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community, the Coast Guard serves on the front line for a Nation whose economic prosperity and national security are inextricably linked to vast maritime interests. Semper ParatusAlways Ready. The Coast Guard is the lead Federal maritime law enforcement agency for securing and managing the Nation’s maritime borders, and enforcing national and international law on the high seas, outer continental shelf, and inward from the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) to inland navigable waters, including the Great Lakes. Research and development funding doubled from $18 million FY 16 to $36 million FY 17 that reverted to $18 million FY 18 and is growing normally at a rate of 3% thereafter. Proposed FY 19 termination of funding for Reserve Training, Environmental Compliance and Restoration and Medicare Eligible Retiree Health Care Fund Contribution (MERHCFC) may be overruled by Congress on its merits. There is some concern that the 2.6% military pay raise may result in reduced Coast Guard employment whereas manpower was not reported by the Coast Guard. Homeland Security reported, there are 41,700 active-duty military; 7,800 reserve military part-time employees; 8,300 civilian full-time employees; and 31,000 civilian auxiliary volunteers employed by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) in 2017. The FY 2019 Budget 'increases the workforce by 109 positions to support Coast Guard activities across six mission programs' is a deceptive statement. In 2019 DHS estimates decrease to 40,863 active duty military; 7,000 part-time military Reserve, 7,780 civilian and 32,000 auxiliary.  The Coast Guard procures countless Cutters and some aircraft.  Opportunistic state actors like Russia and China are building military and technological capabilities to exploit emerging regions and erode our military advantage. Escalating competition is evident in the Arctic, where Russia’s militarization and China’s economic investments have accelerated, effectively challenging U.S. sovereignty and threatening regional stability. Coast Guard polar icebreakers can ensure year-round access to both Polar Regions. 

 

8. The FY 19 budget was formulated around the National Security Strategy (NSS) and National Defense Strategy (NDS) goals to: Protect the American people, the Homeland, and the American way of life, Promote American prosperity, Preserve peace through strength, and Advance American influence.  The National Defense Strategy directs a more lethal, resilient and agile Joint Force that can compete and win in the complex, global security environment. China is undergoing rapid military modernization and is pursuing near-term regional hegemony, owes compensation for wrongful death and detention of CIA informants and jointly declares trade war with tariffs in excess of 6%. Global warmers, Russia seeks to restore its national prestige and is willing to use force and coercion, while North Korea intends to guarantee regime survival through its ballistic missile tests. Iran asserts an arc of regional influence and instability, of radioactive soil. Violence extremist organizations expand coercion to new fronts beyond reinstitution of the Iron Curtain to the Iron Law of Wages. The 2.6% military pay-raise requires attention because it exceeds normal 2.5% labor budget growth = % raise + % net new employment, and overspending is going to cause a deficit or relapse to sanctions, but it might be perceived as a crime to deprive the armed service members of their reserve and promotion distorting bribe. The solution is to increase the growth rate for the armed services budget to 3% annually. This is however still not enough to afford a 2.6% raise + 1% net new employment = 3.6% payroll spending growth, without underhanded cuts to promotion, reserves and other programs, due to a shortage of volunteers, no amount of propaganda can entirely ameliorate. It is therefore promoted, without duress due to the comfortable profit margin of undistributed offsetting receipts, that the Department of Defense lower their military pay-raise to 2% to afford 1% net new employment, with 3% inflation in armed services spending.  Civilians may not be compelled to serve in armed or auxiliary forces. No pressure or propaganda which aims at securing voluntary enlistment is permitted under Art. 51.  Expectant and nursing mothers, teenagers 13-20 years of age, soldiers, laborers and children shall be given additional food, in proportion to their physiological needs under Art. 89 of the Fourth Geneva Convention for the Protection of Civilians of 1949.

 

Welfare and Energy Arrears FY 18 – FY 19

(millions)

 

FY 17

FY 18

FY 18

FY 18 Arrears

FY 19

FY 19

FY 19 Arrears

FY 20

Administration for Children and Families

54,852

54,359

56,510

2,151

47,528

58,336

10,808

60,099

Education

78,623

78,788

80,981

2,193

72,742

83,197

10,455

85,693

Food Stamp

68,015

67,178

70,056

2,878

69,159

72,158

2,999

74,322

Indian Affairs

2,973

2,974

3,041

67

2,521

3,114

593

3,157

 

International Assistance, State and USDA

29,768

19,513

30,874

11,361

20,269

32,097

11,828

33,056

International Contributions

1,401

1,458

2,022

564

995

1,584

589

1,605

Refugee Assistance, State, Customs and ACF

9,573

8,528

9,594

1,066

9,594

10,320

726

10,628

Rental Assistance

39,513

39,251

40,698

1,447

36,926

40,919

3,993

43,175

Supplemental Security Income

58,536

59,978

60,877

899

58,866

63,313

4,447

65,846

UC Benefits

33,800

30,300

34,800

4,500

29,700

35,800

6,100

36,900

Energy Department

30,086

30,025

30,873

848

30,611

31,631

1,020

32,423

Source: Congressional Budget Justifications FY 19

 

9. The President’s hyperinflationary budget requests for the Department of Defense must be convicted of armed robbery under the Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Commandments that prohibit stealing, false testimony and coveting that of the neighbor, respectively.  The Department of Defense is due 3% annual spending growth from CR 18.  The military departments must reduce hyperinflation from as high as 5% FY 18 and FY 19 to 3% by FY 20.  It is imperative that actual and threatened Presidential budget cuts of civilian agencies must be redressed, so that it would be as if the President had paid in full his first term. Agencies are due annual 2.5% government, 3% services, including armed services, internal revenue services, and international assistance, 4% disability and 5% retiree growth for a growing population of poor people to compete with 2.7% average annual inflation. Proposed budget cuts to civilian agencies and FY 18 cuts to international assistance programs, constitute a grave breach of Art. 147 of the Fourth Geneva Convention for the Protection of Civilians, (1949), whereas civilian budget cuts threaten to cause extensive destruction and appropriation of property, not justified by military necessity and carried out unlawfully and wantonly. The Occupying Power may not alter the status of public officials or judges in the occupied territories, or in any way apply sanctions to or take any measures of coercion or discrimination against them. This prohibition does not affect the right of the Occupying Power to remove public officials from their posts under Art. 54. The Occupying Power shall, with the co-operation of the national and local authorities, facilitate the proper working of all institutions devoted to the care and education of children under Art. 50. Budget cuts constitute deprivation of relief benefits under 18USC§246 and deprivation of subsistence under Common Article 1 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.  $27 billion arrears are due FY 18, $11.4 billion international assistance, $550 million UNESCO arrears and $85.7 million dues increasing 3% annually under Art. 19 of the UN Charter.  By reason of attitude not in accordance with the Geneva Conventions the government is under obligation to make good to consequence of injury. Thus, every wrong creates a right for the court to rectify in the Case Concerning the Factory of Chorzow A. No. 9 (1927) the Permanent Court of Justice.  Military budget cuts and zero growth, were found to be Outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment under Common Article 3(c) of the Geneva Conventions and must not be afflicted upon the civilian government and population. 

 

Interior Department Budget Overview FY16 –FY 20

(billions)

 

FY 16

FY 17

FY 18 President

CR 18

FY 18 Arrears

FY 19 President

FY 19 Arrears

FY 20

Total Budget Authority

19.0

19.3

18.0

19.7

19.8

19.4

20.2

20.8

Receipts

8.8

9.6

11.2

10.8

10.8

11.2

11.2

11.5

Federal Expenses

10.2

9.7

6.8

8.9

9.0

8.2

9.0

9.3

Standing Rock

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.1

0

Budget Request

13.4

13.3

11.7

11.7

11.7

11.7

11.7

11.7

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

3.2

3.6

4.9

2.8

2.7

3.5

2.6

2.4

Source: Zinke, Ryan. FY 18 & 19 The Interior Budget in Brief

 

10. The Interior Department must sustain 3% growth in federal outlays for Indian Affairs and 2.5% for other Interior departments, to maintain relationships with 573 federally recognized Tribes in the lower 48 States and Alaska, with a protected population of nearly two million people on 55 million acres, whose land and mineral resources we manage in Trust. The proposed budget cuts are overruled due to the tidy $2.5 billion profit of Interior Department undistributed offsetting.  Budget cuts constitute deprivation of relief benefit under 18USC§246 and bribery of witnesses 18USC§201. $100 million DoD transfer for Palau has not been approved by Congress. Standing Rock Reservation is due $100 million compensation for having the most decreased life expectancy in the nation in 2017 after water-torture in freezing temperatures by out-of-state private pipeline security contractors during the Presidential elections of 2016. Furthermore, the Interior Department does not possess $6 billion in undistributed offsetting receipts it would cost to purchase the Forest Service outright from the Department of Agriculture.  While the occupying Secretary is right that $11.7 billion federal outlays annually is enough for the time being, the Secretary is not declaring undistributed offsetting receipts to express a budget surplus and his actual and threatened budget cuts are unjustified. In his individual capacity as lost-hunter he must see to either repeal of the right to bear arms as codified under 16USC§1a-7b or transfer of the section to obstruction of lawful hunt under 16USC§5201 et seq., to prevent obstruction of justice under 18USC§1513 and cease his unnecessary and abusive advocacy of the overthrow of tribal government under 18USC§2385, and negligence regarding the arson of the National Forests under 18USC§81.  He is to be tried for Conspiracy Art. 81 Uniform Code of Military Justice under 10USC§881 and Obstruction of Justice under Rule 96 (Art. 134) of the Manual for Courts-Martial.  In his defense, Yellowstone history expresses a preference for details of troops specifically ordered to prevent trespassers or intruders from entering the park for the purpose of destroying the game or objects of curiosity therein under 16USC§23 to law enforcement that is indiscriminately authorized to make arrests and carry a firearm under 16USC§1a–6 (2013) and 54USC§102701 (2014) for the dismissal of the magistrate with offices in the Yellowstone jail under 16USC§30 or National Forest under 16USC§551.  There is no defense for sanctions against civilian programs from the Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Commandments that prohibit stealing, false testimony and coveting that of the neighbor under Art. 54 of the Fourth Geneva Convention relating to the Protection of Civilians (1949).  Title 54, National Park Service and Related Programs was made law by Pub. L. 113–287, §6(e) on Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3272. Congress must restore 2013 Chapter 1 National Park Service rules to Title 16 Conservation to create a body of common law with Title 54 of the United States Code.

 

Sanders, Tony J. Chapter 1 Military Diplomacy. 15th Ed. Hospitals & Asylums HA-11-11-18 470 pgs.  www.title24uscode.org/MD.pdf